Interested in promotions? | Click here >>

Polyclonal Antibody Immunohistochemistry Frozen Mitotic Cell Cycle Checkpoint

$303
100 µl
$717
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat, S. cerevisiae

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: One way that growth factors and mitogens effectively promote sustained cell growth and proliferation is by upregulating mRNA translation (1,2). Growth factors and mitogens induce the activation of p70 S6 kinase and the subsequent phosphorylation of the S6 ribosomal protein. Phosphorylation of S6 ribosomal protein correlates with an increase in translation of mRNA transcripts that contain an oligopyrimidine tract in their 5' untranslated regions (2). These particular mRNA transcripts (5'TOP) encode proteins involved in cell cycle progression, as well as ribosomal proteins and elongation factors necessary for translation (2,3). Important S6 ribosomal protein phosphorylation sites include several residues (Ser235, Ser236, Ser240, and Ser244) located within a small, carboxy-terminal region of the S6 protein (4,5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Mre11, originally described in genetic screens from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in which mutants were defective in meiotic recombination (1), is a central part of a multisubunit nuclease composed of Mre11, Rad50 and Nbs1 (MRN) (2,3). The MRN complex plays a critical role in sensing, processing and repairing DNA double strand breaks. Defects lead to genomic instability, telomere shortening, aberrant meiosis and hypersensitivity to DNA damage (4). Hypomorphic mutations of Mre11 are found in ataxia-telangiectasia-like disease (ATLD), with phenotypes similar to mutations in ATM that cause ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T), including a predisposition to malignancy in humans (5). Cellular consequences of ATLD include chromosomal instability and defects in the intra-S phase and G2/M checkpoints in response to DNA damage. The MRN complex may directly activate the ATM checkpoint kinase at DNA breaks (6).