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Polyclonal Antibody Immunohistochemistry Paraffin Actin Filament Polymerization

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Cortactin is a cortical actin binding protein. Its amino-terminal acidic domain (NTA) associates with the Arp2/3 and WASP complex at F-actin branches. The central region of the protein contains six repeats of 37 amino acids that are important in F-actin binding and cross-linking. The carboxy-terminus contains a proline-rich region and an SH3 domain that can interact with numerous scaffolding proteins, such as CortBP1 and Shank3 (1,2). Cortactin is involved in signaling events that coordinate actin reorganization during cell movement. The human cortactin homologue EMS1 is overexpressed in numerous cancers with poor patient prognosis (3). Cortactin may also play an important role in the organization of transmembrane receptors at postsynaptic densities (PSD) and tight junctions by linking scaffolding proteins to the actin network (4).Cortactin is phosphorylated at tyrosine residues 421, 466, and 482. Tyrosine phosphorylation of cortactin regulates cell motility (5), rac1-mediated actin dynamics (6), cadherin-dependent adhesion (7), chemokine trafficking and chemokine-dependent chemotaxis (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Cell growth is a fundamental biological process whereby cells accumulate mass and increase in size. The mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) pathway regulates growth by coordinating energy and nutrient signals with growth factor-derived signals (1). mTOR is a large protein kinase with two different complexes. One complex contains mTOR, GβL, and raptor, which is a target of rapamycin. The other complex, insensitive to rapamycin, includes mTOR, GβL, and rictor (1). GβL associates with the kinase domain of mTOR and stimulates mTOR kinase activity (2). A reduction in GβL expression has been shown to decrease in vivo phosphorylation of S6K1 (2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (CD54 or ICAM-1) is a cell surface glycoprotein that belongs to the immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF) of adhesion molecules. CD54 is expressed at low levels in diverse cell types, and is induced by cytokines (TNF-α, interleukin-1) and bacterial lipopolysaccharide (1). Apical localization of CD54 on endothelial cells (or basolateral localization on epithelial cells) is a prerequisite for leukocyte trafficking through the endothelial (or epithelial) barrier (1). Apical expression of CD54 on epithelial cells mediates pathogen invasion as well as host defense, a pattern also observed in tumors (1). CD54 also functions as a co-stimulator on antigen presenting cells, binding to its receptor LFA-1 (leukocyte function-associated antigen-1) on the surface of T cells during antigen presentation (2). Cross-linking of CD54 or binding to its ligand triggers activation of Src family kinases and the Rho/ROCK pathway (3-7). Phosphorylation on Tyr485 of CD54 is required for its association with SHP-2 (5). SHP-2 seems essential for CD54-induced Src activation (7).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat, Xenopus

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) is one of the earliest events in a cascade that controls a variety of cellular responses, including secretion, gene expression, proliferation, and muscle contraction (1,2). PKC isoforms belong to three groups based on calcium dependency and activators. Classical PKCs are calcium-dependent via their C2 domains and are activated by phosphatidylserine (PS), diacylglycerol (DAG), and phorbol esters (TPA, PMA) through their cysteine-rich C1 domains. Both novel and atypical PKCs are calcium-independent, but only novel PKCs are activated by PS, DAG, and phorbol esters (3-5). Members of these three PKC groups contain a pseudo-substrate or autoinhibitory domain that binds to substrate-binding sites in the catalytic domain to prevent activation in the absence of cofactors or activators. Control of PKC activity is regulated through three distinct phosphorylation events. Phosphorylation occurs in vivo at Thr500 in the activation loop, at Thr641 through autophosphorylation, and at the carboxy-terminal hydrophobic site Ser660 (2). Atypical PKC isoforms lack hydrophobic region phosphorylation, which correlates with the presence of glutamic acid rather than the serine or threonine residues found in more typical PKC isoforms. The enzyme PDK1 or a close relative is responsible for PKC activation. A recent addition to the PKC superfamily is PKCμ (PKD), which is regulated by DAG and TPA through its C1 domain. PKD is distinguished by the presence of a PH domain and by its unique substrate recognition and Golgi localization (6). PKC-related kinases (PRK) lack the C1 domain and do not respond to DAG or phorbol esters. Phosphatidylinositol lipids activate PRKs, and small Rho-family GTPases bind to the homology region 1 (HR1) to regulate PRK kinase activity (7).