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Polyclonal Antibody Immunohistochemistry Paraffin Anatomical Structure Morphogenesis

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Forkhead box (Fox) proteins are a family of evolutionarily conserved transcription factors containing a sequence known as Forkhead box or winged helix DNA binding domain (1). The human genome contains 43 Fox proteins that are divided into subfamilies. The FoxP subfamily has four members, FoxP1 - FoxP4, which are broadly expressed and play important roles in organ development, immune response and cancer pathogenesis (2-4). The FoxP subfamily has several characteristics that are atypical among Fox proteins: their Forkhead domain is located at the carboxy-terminal region and they contain motifs that promote homo- and heterodimerization. FoxP proteins usually function as transcriptional repressors (4,5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Oct-4 (POU5F1) is a transcription factor highly expressed in undifferentiated embryonic stem cells and embryonic germ cells (1). A network of key factors that includes Oct-4, Nanog, and Sox2 is necessary for the maintenance of pluripotent potential, and downregulation of Oct-4 has been shown to trigger cell differentiation (2,3). Research studies have demonstrated that Oct-4 is a useful germ cell tumor marker (4). Oct-4 exists as two splice variants, Oct-4A and Oct-4B (5). Recent studies have suggested that the Oct-4A isoform has the ability to confer and sustain pluripotency, while Oct-4B may exist in some somatic, non-pluripotent cells (6,7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Neural precursor cell-expressed developmentally downregulated protein 8 (NEDD8), also known as Rub1 (related to ubiquitin 1) in plants and yeast, is a member of the ubiquitin-like protein family (1,2). The covalent attachment of NEDD8 to target proteins, termed neddylation, is a reversible, multi-step process analogous to ubiquitination. NEDD8 is first synthesized in a precursor form with a carboxy-terminal extension peptide that is removed by either the UCH-L3 or NEDP1/DEN1 hydrolase protein to yield a mature NEDD8 protein (3,4). Mature NEDD8 is then covalently linked to target proteins via the carboxy-terminal glycine residue in a reaction catalyzed by the APP-BP1/Uba3 heterodimer complex and Ubc12 as the E1- and E2-like enzymes, respectively (5). An E3 ligase protein, Roc1/Rbx1, is also required for neddylation of the cullin proteins (6). Protein de-neddylation is catalyzed by a number of enzymes in the cell, including a "ubiquitin-specific" protease USP21, the NEDP1/DEN1 hydrolase and the COP9/signalosome (CSN) (7,8,9). In contrast to the ubiquitin pathway, the NEDD8 modification system acts on only a few substrates and does not appear to target proteins for degradation. Neddylation of cullin proteins activates the SCF (Skp1-Cullin-F-box) E3 ubiquitin ligase complex by promoting complex formation and enhancing the recruitment of the E2-ubiquitin intermediate (10). While NEDD8 modification of VHL is not required for ubiquitination of HIF1-α, it is required for fibronectin matrix assembly (11). Mdm2-dependent neddylation of p53 inhibits its transcriptional activity (12).