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Polyclonal Antibody Immunohistochemistry Paraffin Response to Ethanol

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (CD54 or ICAM-1) is a cell surface glycoprotein that belongs to the immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF) of adhesion molecules. CD54 is expressed at low levels in diverse cell types, and is induced by cytokines (TNF-α, interleukin-1) and bacterial lipopolysaccharide (1). Apical localization of CD54 on endothelial cells (or basolateral localization on epithelial cells) is a prerequisite for leukocyte trafficking through the endothelial (or epithelial) barrier (1). Apical expression of CD54 on epithelial cells mediates pathogen invasion as well as host defense, a pattern also observed in tumors (1). CD54 also functions as a co-stimulator on antigen presenting cells, binding to its receptor LFA-1 (leukocyte function-associated antigen-1) on the surface of T cells during antigen presentation (2). Cross-linking of CD54 or binding to its ligand triggers activation of Src family kinases and the Rho/ROCK pathway (3-7). Phosphorylation on Tyr485 of CD54 is required for its association with SHP-2 (5). SHP-2 seems essential for CD54-induced Src activation (7).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Cyclin E1 and cyclin E2 can associate with and activate CDK2 (1). Upon DNA damage, upregulation/activation of the CDK inhibitors p21 Waf1/Cip1 and p27 Kip1 prevent cyclin E/CDK2 activation, resulting in G1/S arrest. When conditions are favorable for cell cycle progression, cyclin D/CDK4/6 phosphorylates Rb and is thought to reduce the activity of p21 Waf1/Cip1 and p27 Kip1, allowing subsequent activation of cyclin E/CDK2 (1,2). Cyclin E/CDK2 further phosphorylates Rb to allow progression into S-phase, where cyclin E/CDK2 is thought to phosphorylate and activate multiple proteins involved in DNA synthesis (2,3). Turnover of cyclin E is largely controlled by phosphorylation that results in SCFFbw7-mediated ubiquitination and proteasome-dependent degradation (4,5). Cyclin E1 is phosphorylated at multiple sites in vivo including Thr62, Ser88, Ser72, Thr380 and Ser384, and is controlled by at least two kinases, CDK2 and GSK-3 (6,7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat, Zebrafish

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Actin, a ubiquitous eukaryotic protein, is the major component of the cytoskeleton. At least six isoforms are known in mammals. Nonmuscle β- and γ-actin, also known as cytoplasmic actin, are predominantly expressed in nonmuscle cells, controlling cell structure and motility (1). α-cardiac and α-skeletal actin are expressed in striated cardiac and skeletal muscles, respectively; two smooth muscle actins, α- and γ-actin, are found primarily in vascular smooth muscle and enteric smooth muscle, respectively. These actin isoforms regulate the contractile potential of muscle cells (1). Actin exists mainly as a fibrous polymer, F-actin. In response to cytoskeletal reorganizing signals during processes such as cytokinesis, endocytosis, or stress, cofilin promotes fragmentation and depolymerization of F-actin, resulting in an increase in the monomeric globular form, G-actin (2). The ARP2/3 complex stabilizes F-actin fragments and promotes formation of new actin filaments (2). Research studies have shown that actin is hyperphosphorylated in primary breast tumors (3). Cleavage of actin under apoptotic conditions has been observed in vitro and in cardiac and skeletal muscle, as shown in research studies (4-6). Actin cleavage by caspase-3 may accelerate ubiquitin/proteasome-dependent muscle proteolysis (6).