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Polyclonal Antibody Immunoprecipitation Ephrin Receptor Binding

Also showing Polyclonal Antibody Immunoprecipitation Ephrin Receptor Activity

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Src family of protein tyrosine kinases, which includes Src, Lyn, Fyn, Yes, Lck, Blk, and Hck, are important in the regulation of growth and differentiation of eukaryotic cells (1). Src activity is regulated by tyrosine phosphorylation at two sites, but with opposing effects. While phosphorylation at Tyr416 in the activation loop of the kinase domain upregulates enzyme activity, phosphorylation at Tyr527 in the carboxy-terminal tail by Csk renders the enzyme less active (2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The c-Cbl proto-oncogene is a ubiquitously expressed cytoplasmic adaptor protein that is especially predominant in hematopoietic cells (1,2). c-Cbl is rapidly tyrosine-phosphorylated in response to stimulation of a variety of cell-surface receptors and becomes associated with a number of intracellular signaling molecules such as protein tyrosine kinases, phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase, Crk, and 14-3-3 proteins (3,4). c-Cbl possesses a highly conserved amino-terminal phosphotyrosine binding domain (TKB) and a C3HC4 RING finger motif. The TKB recognizes phosphorylated tyrosines on activated receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) as well as other nonreceptor tyrosine kinases. The RING finger motif recruits ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes. These two domains are primarily responsible for the ubiquitin ligase activity of c-Cbl and downregulation of RTKs (3). Research studies have indicated that in human cancer tissues, c-Cbl is frequently tyrosine-phosphorylated in a tumor-specific manner (5). Phosphorylation of Tyr731 of c-Cbl provides a docking site for downstream signaling components such as p85 and Fyn (6).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The c-Cbl proto-oncogene is a ubiquitously expressed cytoplasmic adaptor protein that is especially predominant in hematopoietic cells (1,2). c-Cbl is rapidly tyrosine-phosphorylated in response to stimulation of a variety of cell-surface receptors and becomes associated with a number of intracellular signaling molecules such as protein tyrosine kinases, phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase, Crk, and 14-3-3 proteins (3,4). c-Cbl possesses a highly conserved amino-terminal phosphotyrosine binding domain (TKB) and a C3HC4 RING finger motif. The TKB recognizes phosphorylated tyrosines on activated receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) as well as other nonreceptor tyrosine kinases. The RING finger motif recruits ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes. These two domains are primarily responsible for the ubiquitin ligase activity of c-Cbl and downregulation of RTKs (3). Research studies have indicated that in human cancer tissues, c-Cbl is frequently tyrosine-phosphorylated in a tumor-specific manner (5). Phosphorylation of Tyr731 of c-Cbl provides a docking site for downstream signaling components such as p85 and Fyn (6).

$303
100 µl
$717
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The family of Trk receptor tyrosine kinases consists of TrkA, TrkB, and TrkC. While the sequence of these family members is highly conserved, they are activated by different neurotrophins: TrkA by NGF, TrkB by BDNF or NT4, and TrkC by NT3 (1). Neurotrophin signaling through these receptors regulates a number of physiological processes, such as cell survival, proliferation, neural development, and axon and dendrite growth and patterning (1). In the adult nervous system, the Trk receptors regulate synaptic strength and plasticity. TrkA regulates proliferation and is important for development and maturation of the nervous system (2). Phosphorylation at Tyr490 is required for Shc association and activation of the Ras-MAP kinase cascade (3,4). Residues Tyr674/675 lie within the catalytic domain, and phosphorylation at these sites reflects TrkA kinase activity (3-6). Point mutations, deletions, and chromosomal rearrangements (chimeras) cause ligand-independent receptor dimerization and activation of TrkA (7-10). TrkA is activated in many malignancies including breast, ovarian, prostate, and thyroid carcinomas (8-13). Research studies suggest that expression of TrkA in neuroblastomas may be a good prognostic marker as TrkA signals growth arrest and differentiation of cells originating from the neural crest (10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are serine/threonine kinases that are activated by cyclins and govern eukaryotic cell cycle progression. While CDK5 shares high sequence homology with its family members, it is thought mainly to function in postmitotic neurons to regulate the cytoarchitecture of these cells. Analogous to cyclins, the regulatory subunits p35 and p39 associate with and activate CDK5 despite the lack of sequence homology. CDK5 is ubiquitously expressed, with high levels of kinase activity detected primarily in the nervous system due to the narrow expression pattern of p35 and p39 in post-mitotic neurons. A large number of CDK5 substrates have been identified although no substrates have been specifically attributed to p35 or p39. Substrates of CDK5 include p35, PAK1, Src, β-catenin, tau, neurofilament-H, neurofilament-M, synapsin-1, APP, DARPP32, PP1-inhibitor, and Rb. p35 is rapidly degraded (T1/2 <20 min) by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (1). However, p35 stability increases as CDK5 kinase activity decreases, likely as a result of decreased phosphorylation of p35 at Thr138 by CDK5 (2). Proteolytic cleavage of p35 by calpain produces p25 upon neurotoxic insult, resulting in prolonged activation of CDK5 by p25. Research studies have shown accumulation of p25 in neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) (3,4).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Eph receptors are the largest known family of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). They can be divided into two groups based on sequence similarity and on their preference for a subset of ligands: EphA receptors bind to a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored ephrin A ligand; EphB receptors bind to ephrin B proteins that have a transmembrane and cytoplasmic domain (1,2). Research studies have shown that Eph receptors and ligands may be involved in many diseases including cancer (3). Both ephrin A and B ligands have dual functions. As RTK ligands, ephrins stimulate the kinase activity of Eph receptors and activate signaling pathways in receptor-expressing cells. The ephrin extracellular domain is sufficient for this function as long as it is clustered (4). The second function of ephrins has been described as "reverse signaling", whereby the cytoplasmic domain becomes tyrosine phosphorylated, allowing interactions with other proteins that may activate signaling pathways in the ligand-expressing cells (5). Various stimuli can induce tyrosine phosphorylation of ephrin B, including binding to EphB receptors, activation of Src kinase, and stimulation by PDGF and FGF (6). Tyr324 and Tyr327 have been identified as major phosphorylation sites of ephrin B1 in vivo (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: EphB6 is a kinase-defective receptor and member of the ephrin-B family of transmembrane proteins (1). Although lacking kinase activity, EphB6 can regulate cellular functions through its interaction with adaptor proteins and other Eph family members (2). In hematopoietic cells, EphB6 is specifically expressed in the T cell population (3) and functions as an important regulator of T cell receptor (TCR) mediated signaling. Upon binding with its ephrin-B1 or ephrin-B2 ligand, EphB6 modulates TCR activity through inhibition of JNK signaling, reduction of CD25 expression, and decreased IL-2 secretion (4). Reduced levels of cell proliferation and cytokine secretion are seen in EphB6 knock-out mice relative to wild type (5). In conjunction with EphB3 receptor activation, EphB6 suppresses Fas receptor induced apoptosis by triggering the Akt activation pathway (6). Research indicates that decreased EphB6 expression is associated with a higher degree of metastasis in various cancers, including breast cancer (7), lung cancer (8), and neuroblastoma (9). EphB6 is thought to reduce cancer invasiveness through its effect on cell adhesion and migration. Following EphrinB1 ligand binding, EphB6 is phosphorylated by kinases such as Src and another active EphB kinase (2, 10, 11). Phosphorylated EphB6 forms a stable complex with Cbl and initiates Cbl inhibition of cell adhesion (2,11). EphB6 regulates signal transduction through direct interaction with other active Eph receptor kinases, sequestering these EphB6-bound receptors and inhibiting typical signal transduction function (12).