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Polyclonal Antibody Immunoprecipitation Inhibition of Nf-Kappab Transcription Factor

$260
100 µl
$630
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Dog, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Pig, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The NF-κB/Rel transcription factors are present in the cytosol in an inactive state complexed with the inhibitory IκB proteins (1-3). Activation occurs via phosphorylation of IκBα at Ser32 and Ser36 followed by proteasome-mediated degradation that results in the release and nuclear translocation of active NF-κB (3-7). IκBα phosphorylation and resulting Rel-dependent transcription are activated by a highly diverse group of extracellular signals including inflammatory cytokines, growth factors, and chemokines. Kinases that phosphorylate IκB at these activating sites have been identified (8).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: A20, also referred to as TNF-α-induced protein 3 (TNFAIP3), is cytokine-inducible protein that functions to inhibit apoptosis and activate NF-κB (1,2). It was first identified as a TNF-α inducible primary response gene in human umbilical vein endothelial cells, and encodes a 790-amino acid protein containing seven Cys2/Cys2-zinc finger motifs (3). Constitutive expression of A20 is observed in lymphoid tissues (4), but it is transiently expressed in a variety of cell types in response to inflammatory signals such as TNF-α (3,5), IL-1 (3,5), phorbol esters (6), and LPS (7). Expression of A20 can confer resistance to apoptosis and NF-κB activation triggered by these signals, probably through interference with TRAF (TNF receptor associated factor) family members (8,9), and interaction with the NF-κB inhibiting protein ABIN (10). Studies also show that A20 contains site-specific ubiquitin modifying activity that can contribute to its biological functions (11,12). The amino-terminus of A20 contains de-ubiquitinating (DUB) activity for Lys63 branches, such as those found in TRAF6 and RIP, while the carboxyl-terminus contains ubiquitin ligase (E3) activity for Lys48 branches of the same substrates and leads to their degradation (12).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Members of the Toll-like receptor (TLR) family, named for the closely related Toll receptor in Drosophila, play a pivotal role in innate immune responses (1-4). TLRs recognize conserved motifs found in various pathogens and mediate defense responses (5-7). Triggering of the TLR pathway leads to the activation of NF-κB and subsequent regulation of immune and inflammatory genes (4). The TLRs and members of the IL-1 receptor family share a conserved stretch of approximately 200 amino acids known as the Toll/Interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain (1). Upon activation, TLRs associate with a number of cytoplasmic adaptor proteins containing TIR domains, including myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88), MyD88-adaptor-like/TIR-associated protein (MAL/TIRAP), Toll-receptor-associated activator of interferon (TRIF), and Toll-receptor-associated molecule (TRAM) (8-10). This association leads to the recruitment and activation of IRAK1 and IRAK4, which form a complex with TRAF6 to activate TAK1 and IKK (8,11-14). Activation of IKK leads to the degradation of IκB, which normally maintains NF-κB in an inactive state by sequestering it in the cytoplasm.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: CYLD is a cytoplasmic deubiquitinating enzyme encoded by a tumor suppressor gene altered in individuals diagnosed with cylindromatosis, a genetic condition characterized by benign tumors of skin appendages (1,2). Functional CYLD deubiquitinase regulates inflammation and cell proliferation by down regulating NF-κB signaling through removal of ubiquitin chains from several NF-κB pathway proteins (3,4). CYLD is a negative regulator of proximal events in Wnt/β-catenin signaling and is a critical regulator of natural killer T cell development (5,6). The transcription factor Snail can inhibit CYLD expression, resulting in melanoma cell proliferation (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Silent Information Regulator (SIR2) family of genes is a highly conserved group of genes that encode nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent protein deacetylases, also known as class III histone deacetylases. The first discovered and best characterized of these genes is Saccharomyces cerevisiae SIR2, which is involved in silencing of mating type loci, telomere maintenance, DNA damage response, and cell aging (1). SirT1, the mammalian ortholog of Sir2, is a nuclear protein implicated in the regulation of many cellular processes, including apoptosis, cellular senescence, endocrine signaling, glucose homeostasis, aging, and longevity. Targets of SirT1 include acetylated p53 (2,3), p300 (4), Ku70 (5), forkhead (FoxO) transcription factors (5,6), PPARγ (7), and the PPARγ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) protein (8). Deacetylation of p53 and FoxO transcription factors represses apoptosis and increases cell survival (2,3,5,6). Deacetylation of PPARγ and PGC-1α regulates the gluconeogenic/glycolytic pathways in the liver and fat mobilization in white adipocytes in response to fasting (7,8). SirT1 deacetylase activity is inhibited by nicotinamide and activated by resveratrol. In addition, SirT1 activity may be regulated by phosphorylation, as it is phosphorylated at Ser27 and Ser47 in vivo; however, the function of these phosphorylation sites has not yet been determined (9).

$303
100 µl
$717
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Silent Information Regulator (SIR2) family of genes is a highly conserved group of genes that encode nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent protein deacetylases, also known as class III histone deacetylases. The first discovered and best characterized of these genes is Saccharomyces cerevisiae SIR2, which is involved in silencing of mating type loci, telomere maintenance, DNA damage response, and cell aging (1). SirT1, the mammalian ortholog of Sir2, is a nuclear protein implicated in the regulation of many cellular processes, including apoptosis, cellular senescence, endocrine signaling, glucose homeostasis, aging, and longevity. Targets of SirT1 include acetylated p53 (2,3), p300 (4), Ku70 (5), forkhead (FoxO) transcription factors (5,6), PPARγ (7), and the PPARγ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) protein (8). Deacetylation of p53 and FoxO transcription factors represses apoptosis and increases cell survival (2,3,5,6). Deacetylation of PPARγ and PGC-1α regulates the gluconeogenic/glycolytic pathways in the liver and fat mobilization in white adipocytes in response to fasting (7,8). SirT1 deacetylase activity is inhibited by nicotinamide and activated by resveratrol. In addition, SirT1 activity may be regulated by phosphorylation, as it is phosphorylated at Ser27 and Ser47 in vivo; however, the function of these phosphorylation sites has not yet been determined (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Silent Information Regulator (SIR2) family of genes is a highly conserved group of genes that encode nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent protein deacetylases, also known as class III histone deacetylases. The first discovered and best characterized of these genes is Saccharomyces cerevisiae SIR2, which is involved in silencing of mating type loci, telomere maintenance, DNA damage response, and cell aging (1). SirT1, the mammalian ortholog of Sir2, is a nuclear protein implicated in the regulation of many cellular processes, including apoptosis, cellular senescence, endocrine signaling, glucose homeostasis, aging, and longevity. Targets of SirT1 include acetylated p53 (2,3), p300 (4), Ku70 (5), forkhead (FoxO) transcription factors (5,6), PPARγ (7), and the PPARγ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) protein (8). Deacetylation of p53 and FoxO transcription factors represses apoptosis and increases cell survival (2,3,5,6). Deacetylation of PPARγ and PGC-1α regulates the gluconeogenic/glycolytic pathways in the liver and fat mobilization in white adipocytes in response to fasting (7,8). SirT1 deacetylase activity is inhibited by nicotinamide and activated by resveratrol. In addition, SirT1 activity may be regulated by phosphorylation, as it is phosphorylated at Ser27 and Ser47 in vivo; however, the function of these phosphorylation sites has not yet been determined (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Protein ubiquitination and deubiquitination are reversible processes catalyzed by ubiquitinating enzymes (UBEs) and deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) (1,2). Five subfamilies of DUBs have been characterized to date, and include USP, UCH, OTU, MJD, and JAMM deubiquitinating enzymes (1,2). The ovarian tumor (OTU) DUB subfamily comprises a group of approximately 100 putative cysteine proteases that are homologous to the Drosophila ovarian tumor gene product (3). OTU domain-containing deubiquitinase with linear linkage specificity (OTULIN, FAM105B, Gumby) is an OTU subfamily deubiquitinating enzyme that antagonizes the E3 linear ubiquitin chain assembly complex (LUBAC) by promoting disassembly of Met1-linked (linear) ubiquitin chains (4,5). LUBAC and OTULIN regulate NOD2 signaling in an antagonistic manner by controlling the level of Met1-ubiquitinated RIPK2 kinase (6). Binding of the OTULIN PUB-interacting motif to the HOIP subunit of LUBAC is critical for OTULIN inhibition of NF-κΒ signaling; this OTULIN-HOIP interaction is negatively regulated by tyrosine phosphorylation of OTULIN (7,8). The ability of OTULIN to influence LUBAC function and the presence of linear ubiquitin chains may play an important role in regulating angiogenesis, craniofacial, and neural development (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Absent in melanoma 2 (AIM2) is an interferon-inducible protein containing an amino-terminal pyrin domain and carboxy-terminal HIN-200 domain that functions in innate immunity and tumor progression (1). Expression of AIM2 can inhibit cell growth and tumor formation (2,3). Furthermore, the AIM2 gene has a high frequency of mutations associated with microsatellite-unstable colorectal cancers (4). AIM2 has a critical role in the activation of caspase-1, the protease responsible for the processing of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-18. Caspase-1 activation is regulated by multi-protein complexes referred to as “inflammasomes” (5,6). Distinct inflammasome complexes have been described containing NLRP1/NALP1, NLRP3/NALP3, IPAF, and AIM2. The HIN-200 domain of AIM2 is responsible for binding to cytoplasmic double stranded DNA, resulting in caspase-1 activation. (7-9). This inflammasome complex also involves binding of the pyrin domain of AIM2 to the CARD-domain protein ASC/TMS1, which then interacts directly with caspase-1. As a result, AIM2 has been demonstrated to be an important sensor for a number of different pathogens (10-12).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) were first identified as molecules that can induce ectopic bone and cartilage formation (1,2). BMPs belong to the TGF-β superfamily, playing many diverse functions during development (3). BMPs are synthesized as precursor proteins and then processed by cleavage to release the C-terminal mature BMP. BMPs initiate signaling by binding to a receptor complex containing type I and type II serine/threonine receptor kinases that then phosphorylate Smad (mainly Smad1, 5, and 8), resulting in the translocation of Smad into the nucleus. BMP was also reported to activate MAPK pathways in some systems (3,4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Death associated protein 1 (DAP1) is a 15 kDa protein that functions as a positive mediator of cell death initiated by interferon-gamma (1, 2). The DAP1 protein is proline rich and possesses one SH3 binding motif, as well as several consensus protein kinase phosphorylation sites (1). The protein is localized in the cytoplasm, but the detailed mechanism of its proapoptotic function is unclear. Death associated protein 3 (DAP3) is widely expressed, and the expression is upregulated during membrane receptor-mediated apoptosis. In interferon-gamma- and Fas-induced apoptosis, DAP3 acts as a positive mediator, functioning downstream of the receptor signaling complex and upstream of the effector caspases (3,4). Death associated protein 5 (DAP5) is a 97 kDa protein with a high degree of amino acid sequence homology to eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4G (Elf4G) (1,5). Compared with elF4G, DAP5 lacks the amino-terminal region necessary for cap-dependent translation, and has a unique carboxy-terminal region that functions as a regulator of interferon-gamma-induced cell death (5,6). During induction of apoptosis, DAP5 is cleaved at aspartic acid 790. The carboxy-terminal truncated form of DAP5 functions as a cap-independent translation initiation factor responsible for the mediation of its own translation during apoptosis (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: First identified as a pro-apoptotic protein that binds the cytoplasmic tail of the TNF receptor superfamily member CD27 (1), Siva-1 also binds several other TNFR family members including glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor receptor (GITR) and OX40 (1-3), as well as anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members Bcl-xL and Bcl-2 (4,5). Siva-1 is composed of a central death domain homology region, a C-terminal box-B-like ring finger followed by a zinc finger-like domain, and a unique N-terminal amphipathic helical region (SAH) (1,4). Studies have demonstrated that Siva-1 has the ability to induce cell death via both the extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways (1-8). The SAH domain of Siva-1 is responsible for the inhibition of the pro-survival activities of Bcl-xL and Bcl-2, leading to caspase-mediated cell death (4,5,8). Siva-1 plays a role in T cell signaling and homeostasis by inhibiting NF-κB activity, also resulting in apoptotic cell death (7,9). An alternative splice variant of Siva-1, Siva-2, lacks part of the SAH and death domains and is less effective at inducing apoptosis (1,2,5,8). Studies in xenografts have shown that down-regulation of Siva-1 inhibits tumorigenesis in response to p53 activation (10). Down-regulation of Siva-1 may also play a role in tumor metastasis through its regulation of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and cell migration (11). Overexpression of Siva-1 is implicated in several pathological conditions including acute ischemic injury (12) and Coxsackievirus infection (13).