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Polyclonal Antibody Immunoprecipitation Regulation of Actin Filament Polymerization

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Cortactin is a cortical actin binding protein. Its amino-terminal acidic domain (NTA) associates with the Arp2/3 and WASP complex at F-actin branches. The central region of the protein contains six repeats of 37 amino acids that are important in F-actin binding and cross-linking. The carboxy-terminus contains a proline-rich region and an SH3 domain that can interact with numerous scaffolding proteins, such as CortBP1 and Shank3 (1,2). Cortactin is involved in signaling events that coordinate actin reorganization during cell movement. The human cortactin homologue EMS1 is overexpressed in numerous cancers with poor patient prognosis (3). Cortactin may also play an important role in the organization of transmembrane receptors at postsynaptic densities (PSD) and tight junctions by linking scaffolding proteins to the actin network (4).Cortactin is phosphorylated at tyrosine residues 421, 466, and 482. Tyrosine phosphorylation of cortactin regulates cell motility (5), rac1-mediated actin dynamics (6), cadherin-dependent adhesion (7), chemokine trafficking and chemokine-dependent chemotaxis (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Ena/VASP-like (EVL) protein is a member of the Ena/VASP family and is involved in actin-associated cytoskeleton remodeling and cell polarity activities including axon guidance and lamellipodia formation in migrating cells (1,2,3). The EVL protein sequence contains an N-terminal EVH1 domain, a Pro-rich SH3 binding domain, and a C-terminal EVH2 domain. EVL domain interactions with G- and F-actin mediates actin nucleation and polymerization (4). Research studies have shown that EVL also regulates DNA repair by direct interaction with RAD51 (5). EVL may function in the DSB repair pathway through the EVH2 domain, which possesses DNA-binding and RAD51 binding activity, thereby coordinating homologous DNA recombination (6,7). Research studies have shown EVL expression is up-regulated in human breast cancer associated with clinical stages and may be implicated in invasion and/or metastasis of human breast cancer (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: HS1 (HCLS1, LckBP1, p75) is a protein kinase substrate that is expressed only in tissues and cells of hematopoietic origin (1,2). HS1 contains four cortactin repeats and a single SH3 domain (2). This intracellular protein is phosphorylated following immune receptor activation, which promotes recruitment of HS1 to the immune synapse (3-5). Phosphorylation of HS1 is required to regulate actin dynamics and provide docking sites for many other signaling molecules, such as Vav1 and PLCγ1 (6). HS1 also plays an important role in platelet activation (7).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) is one of the earliest events in a cascade that controls a variety of cellular responses, including secretion, gene expression, proliferation, and muscle contraction (1,2). PKC isoforms belong to three groups based on calcium dependency and activators. Classical PKCs are calcium-dependent via their C2 domains and are activated by phosphatidylserine (PS), diacylglycerol (DAG), and phorbol esters (TPA, PMA) through their cysteine-rich C1 domains. Both novel and atypical PKCs are calcium-independent, but only novel PKCs are activated by PS, DAG, and phorbol esters (3-5). Members of these three PKC groups contain a pseudo-substrate or autoinhibitory domain that binds to substrate-binding sites in the catalytic domain to prevent activation in the absence of cofactors or activators. Control of PKC activity is regulated through three distinct phosphorylation events. Phosphorylation occurs in vivo at Thr500 in the activation loop, at Thr641 through autophosphorylation, and at the carboxy-terminal hydrophobic site Ser660 (2). Atypical PKC isoforms lack hydrophobic region phosphorylation, which correlates with the presence of glutamic acid rather than the serine or threonine residues found in more typical PKC isoforms. The enzyme PDK1 or a close relative is responsible for PKC activation. A recent addition to the PKC superfamily is PKCμ (PKD), which is regulated by DAG and TPA through its C1 domain. PKD is distinguished by the presence of a PH domain and by its unique substrate recognition and Golgi localization (6). PKC-related kinases (PRK) lack the C1 domain and do not respond to DAG or phorbol esters. Phosphatidylinositol lipids activate PRKs, and small Rho-family GTPases bind to the homology region 1 (HR1) to regulate PRK kinase activity (7).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: HS1 (HCLS1, LckBP1, p75) is a protein kinase substrate that is expressed only in tissues and cells of hematopoietic origin (1,2). HS1 contains four cortactin repeats and a single SH3 domain (2). This intracellular protein is phosphorylated following immune receptor activation, which promotes recruitment of HS1 to the immune synapse (3-5). Phosphorylation of HS1 is required to regulate actin dynamics and provide docking sites for many other signaling molecules, such as Vav1 and PLCγ1 (6). HS1 also plays an important role in platelet activation (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: HS1 (HCLS1, LckBP1, p75) is a protein kinase substrate that is expressed only in tissues and cells of hematopoietic origin (1,2). HS1 contains four cortactin repeats and a single SH3 domain (2). This intracellular protein is phosphorylated following immune receptor activation, which promotes recruitment of HS1 to the immune synapse (3-5). Phosphorylation of HS1 is required to regulate actin dynamics and provide docking sites for many other signaling molecules, such as Vav1 and PLCγ1 (6). HS1 also plays an important role in platelet activation (7).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The p21-activated kinase (PAK) family of serine/threonine kinases is engaged in multiple cellular processes, including cytoskeletal reorganization, MAPK signaling, apoptotic signaling, control of phagocyte NADPH oxidase, and growth factor-induced neurite outgrowth (1,2). Several mechanisms that induce PAK activity have been reported. Binding of Rac/Cdc42 to the CRIB (or PBD) domain near the amino terminus of PAK causes autophosphorylation and conformational changes in PAK (1). Phosphorylation of PAK1 at Thr423 by PDK induces activation of PAK1 (3). Several autophosphorylation sites have been identified, including Ser199 and Ser204 of PAK1 and Ser192 and Ser197 of PAK2 (4,5). Because the autophosphorylation sites are located in the amino-terminal inhibitory domain, it has been hypothesized that modification in this region prevents the kinase from reverting to an inactive conformation (6). Research indicates that phosphorylation at Ser144 of PAK1 or Ser139 of PAK3 (located in the kinase inhibitory domain) affects kinase activity (7). Phosphorylation at Ser21 of PAK1 or Ser20 of PAK2 regulates binding with the adaptor protein Nck (8). PAK4, PAK5, and PAK6 have lower sequence similarity with PAK1-3 in the amino-terminal regulatory region (9). Phosphorylation at Ser474 of PAK4, a site analogous to Thr423 of PAK1, may play a pivotal role in regulating the activity and function of PAK4 (10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) is one of the earliest events in a cascade that controls a variety of cellular responses, including secretion, gene expression, proliferation, and muscle contraction (1,2). PKC isoforms belong to three groups based on calcium dependency and activators. Classical PKCs are calcium-dependent via their C2 domains and are activated by phosphatidylserine (PS), diacylglycerol (DAG), and phorbol esters (TPA, PMA) through their cysteine-rich C1 domains. Both novel and atypical PKCs are calcium-independent, but only novel PKCs are activated by PS, DAG, and phorbol esters (3-5). Members of these three PKC groups contain a pseudo-substrate or autoinhibitory domain that binds to substrate-binding sites in the catalytic domain to prevent activation in the absence of cofactors or activators. Control of PKC activity is regulated through three distinct phosphorylation events. Phosphorylation occurs in vivo at Thr500 in the activation loop, at Thr641 through autophosphorylation, and at the carboxy-terminal hydrophobic site Ser660 (2). Atypical PKC isoforms lack hydrophobic region phosphorylation, which correlates with the presence of glutamic acid rather than the serine or threonine residues found in more typical PKC isoforms. The enzyme PDK1 or a close relative is responsible for PKC activation. A recent addition to the PKC superfamily is PKCμ (PKD), which is regulated by DAG and TPA through its C1 domain. PKD is distinguished by the presence of a PH domain and by its unique substrate recognition and Golgi localization (6). PKC-related kinases (PRK) lack the C1 domain and do not respond to DAG or phorbol esters. Phosphatidylinositol lipids activate PRKs, and small Rho-family GTPases bind to the homology region 1 (HR1) to regulate PRK kinase activity (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR, FRAP, RAFT) is a Ser/Thr protein kinase (1-3) that functions as an ATP and amino acid sensor to balance nutrient availability and cell growth (4,5). When sufficient nutrients are available, mTOR responds to a phosphatidic acid-mediated signal to transmit a positive signal to p70 S6 kinase and participate in the inactivation of the eIF4E inhibitor, 4E-BP1 (6). These events result in the translation of specific mRNA subpopulations. mTOR is phosphorylated at Ser2448 via the PI3 kinase/Akt signaling pathway and autophosphorylated at Ser2481 (7,8). mTOR plays a key role in cell growth and homeostasis and may be abnormally regulated in tumors. For these reasons, mTOR is currently under investigation as a potential target for anti-cancer therapy (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Protein tyrosine kinase Pyk2, also called CAKβ, RAFTK and CADTK, is a nonreceptor tyrosine kinase structurally related to focal adhesion kinase (FAK) (1-4). Pyk2 is predominantly expressed in cells derived from hematopoietic lineages and in the central nervous system. Pyk2 is one of the signaling mediators for the G-protein-coupled receptors and MAP kinase signaling pathway. It plays an important role in cell spreading and migration (5-7).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Protein tyrosine kinase Pyk2, also called CAKβ, RAFTK and CADTK, is a nonreceptor tyrosine kinase structurally related to focal adhesion kinase (FAK) (1-4). Pyk2 is predominantly expressed in cells derived from hematopoietic lineages and in the central nervous system. Pyk2 is one of the signaling mediators for the G-protein-coupled receptors and MAP kinase signaling pathway. It plays an important role in cell spreading and migration (5-7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Protein tyrosine kinase Pyk2, also called CAKβ, RAFTK and CADTK, is a nonreceptor tyrosine kinase structurally related to focal adhesion kinase (FAK) (1-4). Pyk2 is predominantly expressed in cells derived from hematopoietic lineages and in the central nervous system. Pyk2 is one of the signaling mediators for the G-protein-coupled receptors and MAP kinase signaling pathway. It plays an important role in cell spreading and migration (5-7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome proteins (WASPs) mediate actin dynamics by activating the Arp2/3 actin nucleation complex in response to activated Rho family GTPases. In mammals, five WASP family members have been described. Hematopoietic WASP and ubiquitously expressed N-WASP are autoinhibited in unstimulated cells. Upon stimulation they are activated by cdc42, which relieves the autoinhibition in conjunction with phosphatidyl inositol 4,5-bisphosphate. Three WAVE (Wasf, SCAR) family proteins are similar in sequence to WASP and N-WASP but lack the WASP/N-WASP autoinhibition domains and are indirectly activated by Rac (reviewed in 1). Both WASP and WAVE functions appear to be essential, as knockout of either N-WASP or Scar-2 in mice results in cardiac and neuronal defects and embryonic lethality (2,3). Loss of WASP results in immune system defects and fewer immune cells (4). WAVE-2 (WASF2) is widely distributed, while WAVE-1 and WAVE-3 are strongly expressed in brain (5). WAVE-3 may act as a tumor suppressor in neuroblastoma, a childhood disease of the sympathetic nervous system (6). Increased expression of WAVE-3 is seen in breast cancer, and studies in breast adenocarcinoma cells indicate that WAVE-3 regulates breast cancer progression, invasion and metastasis through the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway (7,8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome proteins (WASPs) mediate actin dynamics by activating the Arp2/3 actin nucleation complex in response to activated Rho family GTPases. In mammals, five WASP family members have been described. Hematopoietic WASP and ubiquitously expressed N-WASP are autoinhibited in unstimulated cells. Upon stimulation they are activated by cdc42, which relieves the autoinhibition in conjunction with phosphatidyl inositol 4,5-bisphosphate. Three WAVE (Wasf, SCAR) family proteins are similar in sequence to WASP and N-WASP but lack the WASP/N-WASP autoinhibition domains and are indirectly activated by Rac (reviewed in 1). Both WASP and WAVE functions appear to be essential, as knockout of either N-WASP or Scar-2 in mice results in cardiac and neuronal defects and embryonic lethality (2,3). Loss of WASP results in immune system defects and fewer immune cells (4). WAVE-2 (WASF2) is widely distributed, while WAVE-1 and WAVE-3 are strongly expressed in brain (5). WAVE-3 may act as a tumor suppressor in neuroblastoma, a childhood disease of the sympathetic nervous system (6). Increased expression of WAVE-3 is seen in breast cancer, and studies in breast adenocarcinoma cells indicate that WAVE-3 regulates breast cancer progression, invasion and metastasis through the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway (7,8).

$303
100 µl
$717
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Members of the Janus family of tyrosine kinases (Jak1, Jak2, Jak3, and Tyk2) are activated by ligands binding to a number of associated cytokine receptors (1). Upon cytokine receptor activation, Jak proteins become autophosphorylated and phosphorylate their associated receptors to provide multiple binding sites for signaling proteins. These associated signaling proteins, such as Stats (2), Shc (3), insulin receptor substrates (4), and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) (5), typically contain SH2 or other phospho-tyrosine-binding domains.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: TRPV4 is a member of the transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) family of ion channels, and functions as a Ca2+-permeant non-selective cation channel. TRPV4 channels are expressed in many cell types, with particular abundance in sensory and spinal neurons (1). TRPV4 channels play a role in maintaining cellular homeostasis, by facilitating transmembrane Ca2+ transport in response to various stimuli, including thermal stress, fatty acid metabolites, and hypotonicity (2). Mutations in the TRPV4 gene have consequently been attributed to a variety of pathological conditions. For example, constitutively active TRPV4 mutants can lead to excess Ca2+ influx, resulting in toxicity and degeneration of peripheral nerves (3). TRPV4-dependent Ca2+ influx was also shown to mediate strain-induced and TGFβ1-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), suggesting a mechanistic role for TRPV4-mediated Ca2+ transport in fibrosis and oncogenesis (4). Consistent with this, studies in capillary endothelial cells showed that mechanical strain-induced Ca2+ influx through TRPV4 promote focal adhesion and stress fiber remodeling, mediated specifically through integrins, PI3K, and downstream kinases including Rho and ROCK (5).