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Polyclonal Antibody Inner Ear Receptor Cell Development

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Dicer is a member of the RNase III family that specifically cleaves double-stranded RNAs to generate microRNAs (miRNAs) (1). After long primary transcript pri-miRNAs are processed to stem-looped pre-miRNAs by Drosha (2), pre-miRNAs are transported to the cytoplasm and further processed by Dicer to produce 22-nucleotide mature miRNAs (3). The mature miRNA then becomes a part of the RNA-Induced Silencing Complex (RISC) and can bind to the 3' UTR of the target mRNA (3).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) produce mitogenic and angiogenic effects in target cells by signaling through cell surface receptor tyrosine kinases. There are four members of the FGF receptor family: FGFR1 (flg), FGFR2 (bek, KGFR), FGFR3, and FGFR4. Each receptor contains an extracellular ligand binding domain, a transmembrane domain, and a cytoplasmic kinase domain (1). Following ligand binding and dimerization, the receptors are phosphorylated at specific tyrosine residues (2). Seven tyrosine residues in the cytoplasmic tail of FGFR1 can be phosphorylated: Tyr463, 583, 585, 653, 654, 730, and 766. Tyr653 and Tyr654 are important for catalytic activity of activated FGFR and are essential for signaling (3). The other phosphorylated tyrosine residues may provide docking sites for downstream signaling components such as Crk and PLCγ (4,5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) produce mitogenic and angiogenic effects in target cells by signaling through cell surface receptor tyrosine kinases. There are four members of the FGF receptor family: FGFR1 (flg), FGFR2 (bek, KGFR), FGFR3, and FGFR4. Each receptor contains an extracellular ligand binding domain, a transmembrane domain, and a cytoplasmic kinase domain (1). Following ligand binding and dimerization, the receptors are phosphorylated at specific tyrosine residues (2). Seven tyrosine residues in the cytoplasmic tail of FGFR1 can be phosphorylated: Tyr463, 583, 585, 653, 654, 730, and 766. Tyr653 and Tyr654 are important for catalytic activity of activated FGFR and are essential for signaling (3). The other phosphorylated tyrosine residues may provide docking sites for downstream signaling components such as Crk and PLCγ (4,5).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) produce mitogenic and angiogenic effects in target cells by signaling through cell surface receptor tyrosine kinases. There are four members of the FGF receptor family: FGFR1 (flg), FGFR2 (bek, KGFR), FGFR3, and FGFR4. Each receptor contains an extracellular ligand binding domain, a transmembrane domain, and a cytoplasmic kinase domain (1). Following ligand binding and dimerization, the receptors are phosphorylated at specific tyrosine residues (2). Seven tyrosine residues in the cytoplasmic tail of FGFR1 can be phosphorylated: Tyr463, 583, 585, 653, 654, 730, and 766. Tyr653 and Tyr654 are important for catalytic activity of activated FGFR and are essential for signaling (3). The other phosphorylated tyrosine residues may provide docking sites for downstream signaling components such as Crk and PLCγ (4,5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Syndecans are a family of type 1 transmembrane heparan sulphate proteoglycans comprising 4 members in mammals (SDC-1 to -4) (1) encoded by four syndecan genes. Syndecans are involved in embryonic development, tumorigenesis, and angiogenesis (2). The extracellular domain harbors attachment sites for heparan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate chains, facilitating interaction with an array of proteins including a plethora of growth factors. In addition, the hydrophobic C-terminal intracellular domain can interact with proteins containing a PDZ domain (2). These interactions place syndecans as important integrators of membrane signaling (3). Syndecans undergo proteolytic cleavage causing the release of their extracellular domain (shedding), converting the membrane-bound proteins into soluble molecular effectors (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) superfamily members are critical regulators of cell proliferation and differentiation, developmental patterning and morphogenesis, and disease pathogenesis (1-4). TGF-β elicits signaling through three cell surface receptors: type I (RI), type II (RII), and type III (RIII). Type I and type II receptors are serine/threonine kinases that form a heteromeric complex. In response to ligand binding, the type II receptors form a stable complex with the type I receptors allowing phosphorylation and activation of type I receptor kinases (5). The type III receptor, also known as betaglycan, is a transmembrane proteoglycan with a large extracellular domain that binds TGF-β with high affinity but lacks a cytoplasmic signaling domain (6,7). Expression of the type III receptor can regulate TGF-β signaling through presentation of the ligand to the signaling complex. The only known direct TGF-β signaling effectors are the Smad family proteins, which transduce signals from the cell surface directly to the nucleus to regulate target gene transcription (8,9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: SPARC (secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine), also known as osteonectin and BM40, is a secreted matricellular glycoprotein that belongs to a group of functionally related glycoproteins that includes tenascins C and X, thrombospondins 1 and 2, and osteopontin (1). Members in this class of glycoproteins are involved in tissue renewal, tissue remodeling, and embryonic development and work by exerting counter-adhesive and antiproliferative effects that lead to changes in cell shape, disruption of cell adhesion, and inhibition of the cell cycle (2). SPARC is expressed at high levels in bone tissue but is widely distributed in many other tissues and cell types (3), and is known to be associated with tissues undergoing morphogenesis, angiogenesis, mineralization, and other pathological responses to injury and tumorigenesis (4,5). SPARC has also been linked with obesity and diabetes (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Pig, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The Bcr gene was orginally identified by its presence in the chimeric Bcr-Abl oncogene (1). The amino-terminal region of Bcr contains an oligomerization domain, a serine/threonine kinase domain, and a region that binds SH2 domains. The middle of the protein has a PH domain and a region of sequence similarity to the guanine nucleotide exchange factors for the Rho family of GTP binding proteins. The carboxy-terminal region may be involved in a GTPase activating function for the small GTP-binding protein Rac (2,3). The function of wild type Bcr in cells remains unclear. PDGF receptor may use Bcr as a downstream signaling mediator (4). Research studies have shown that the Bcr-Abl fusion results in production of a constitutively active tyrosine kinase, which causes chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) (5). Tyr177 of Bcr is phosphorylated in the Bcr-Abl fusion protein, which plays an important role in transforming the activity of Bcr-Abl (6). Phosphorylated Tyr177 provides a docking site for Gab2 and GRB2 (7,8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The Wnt family includes several secreted glycoproteins that play important roles in animal development (1). There are 19 Wnt genes in the human genome that encode functionally distinct Wnt proteins (2). Wnt members bind to the Frizzled family of seven-pass transmembrane proteins and activate several signaling pathways (3). The canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway also requires a coreceptor from the low-density lipoprotein receptor family (4). Aberrant activation of Wnt signaling pathways is involved in several types of cancers (5).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Notch signaling is activated upon engagement of the Notch receptor with its ligands, the DSL (Delta, Serrate, Lag2) proteins of single-pass type I membrane proteins. The DSL proteins contain multiple EGF-like repeats and a DSL domain that is required for binding to Notch (1,2). Five DSL proteins have been identified in mammals: Jagged1, Jagged2, Delta-like (DLL) 1, 3 and 4 (3). Ligand binding to the Notch receptor results in two sequential proteolytic cleavages of the receptor by the ADAM protease and the γ-secretase complex. The intracellular domain of Notch is released and then translocates to the nucleus where it activates transcription. Notch ligands may also be processed in a way similar to Notch, suggesting a bi-directional signaling through receptor-ligand interactions (4-6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: SHP-2 (PTPN11) is a ubiquitously expressed, nonreceptor protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP). It participates in signaling events downstream of receptors for growth factors, cytokines, hormones, antigens, and extracellular matrices in the control of cell growth, differentiation, migration, and death (1). Activation of SHP-2 and its association with Gab1 is critical for sustained Erk activation downstream of several growth factor receptors and cytokines (2). In addition to its role in Gab1-mediated Erk activation, SHP-2 attenuates EGF-dependent PI3 kinase activation by dephosphorylating Gab1 at p85 binding sites (3). SHP-2 becomes phosphorylated at Tyr542 and Tyr580 in its carboxy-terminus in response to growth factor receptor activation (4). These phosphorylation events are thought to relieve basal inhibition and stimulate SHP-2 tyrosine phosphatase activity (5). Mutations in the corresponding gene result in a pair of clinically similar disorders (Noonan syndrome and LEOPARD syndrome) that may result from abnormal MAPK regulation (6).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Western Blotting

Background: The Bcr gene was orginally identified by its presence in the chimeric Bcr-Abl oncogene (1). The amino-terminal region of Bcr contains an oligomerization domain, a serine/threonine kinase domain, and a region that binds SH2 domains. The middle of the protein has a PH domain and a region of sequence similarity to the guanine nucleotide exchange factors for the Rho family of GTP binding proteins. The carboxy-terminal region may be involved in a GTPase activating function for the small GTP-binding protein Rac (2,3). The function of wild type Bcr in cells remains unclear. PDGF receptor may use Bcr as a downstream signaling mediator (4). Research studies have shown that the Bcr-Abl fusion results in production of a constitutively active tyrosine kinase, which causes chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) (5). Tyr177 of Bcr is phosphorylated in the Bcr-Abl fusion protein, which plays an important role in transforming the activity of Bcr-Abl (6). Phosphorylated Tyr177 provides a docking site for Gab2 and GRB2 (7,8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: ROR1 and ROR2 are orphan receptor tyrosine kinases that are most closely related to MuSK and the Trk family of neurotrophin receptors. They are characterized by the presence of extracellular frizzled-like cysteine-rich domains and membrane-proximal kringle domains, both of which are assumed to mediate protein-protein interactions (1-3). The ROR family RTKs are evolutionarily conserved among Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila, mice, and humans (1,4). Although the functions of ROR kinases are unknown, similarities between ROR and MuSK and Trk kinases have led to speculation that ROR kinases regulate synaptic development. CAM-1, a C. elegans ortholog of the ROR family RTKs, plays several important roles in regulating cellular migration, polarity of asymmetric cell divisions, and axonal outgrowth of neurons during nematode development (4). mROR1 and mROR2 may play differential roles during the development of the nervous system (5).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: p27 Kip1 is a member of the Cip/Kip family of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors. Like its relatives, p57 Kip2 and p21 Waf1/Cip1, the ability to enforce the G1 restriction point is derived from its inhibitory binding to CDK2/cyclin E and other CDK/cyclin complexes. Expression levels of p27 are upregulated in quiescent cells and in cells treated with cAMP or other negative cell cycle regulators. Downregulation of p27 can be induced by treatment with interleukin-2 or other mitogens; this involves phosphorylation of p27 and its degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (1-4).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Western Blotting

Background: Platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) family proteins exist as several disulphide-bonded, dimeric isoforms (PDGF AA, PDGF AB, PDGF BB, PDGF CC, and PDGF DD) that bind in a specific pattern to two closely related receptor tyrosine kinases, PDGF receptor α (PDGFRα) and PDGF receptor β (PDGFRβ). PDGFRα and PDGFRβ share 75% to 85% sequence homology between their two intracellular kinase domains, while the kinase insert and carboxy-terminal tail regions display a lower level (27% to 28%) of homology (1). PDGFRα homodimers bind all PDGF isoforms except those containing PDGF D. PDGFRβ homodimers bind PDGF BB and DD isoforms, as well as the PDGF AB heterodimer. The heteromeric PDGF receptor α/β binds PDGF B, C, and D homodimers, as well as the PDGF AB heterodimer (2). PDGFRα and PDGFRβ can each form heterodimers with EGFR, which is also activated by PDGF (3). Various cells differ in the total number of receptors present and in the receptor subunit composition, which may account for responsive differences among cell types to PDGF binding (4). Ligand binding induces receptor dimerization and autophosphorylation, followed by binding and activation of cytoplasmic SH2 domain-containing signal transduction molecules, such as GRB2, Src, GAP, PI3 kinase, PLCγ, and NCK. A number of different signaling pathways are initiated by activated PDGF receptors and lead to control of cell growth, actin reorganization, migration, and differentiation (5). Tyr751 in the kinase-insert region of PDGFRβ is the docking site for PI3 kinase (6). Phosphorylated pentapeptides derived from Tyr751 of PDGFRβ (pTyr751-Val-Pro-Met-Leu) inhibit the association of the carboxy-terminal SH2 domain of the p85 subunit of PI3 kinase with PDGFRβ (7). Tyr740 is also required for PDGFRβ-mediated PI3 kinase activation (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) family proteins exist as several disulphide-bonded, dimeric isoforms (PDGF AA, PDGF AB, PDGF BB, PDGF CC, and PDGF DD) that bind in a specific pattern to two closely related receptor tyrosine kinases, PDGF receptor α (PDGFRα) and PDGF receptor β (PDGFRβ). PDGFRα and PDGFRβ share 75% to 85% sequence homology between their two intracellular kinase domains, while the kinase insert and carboxy-terminal tail regions display a lower level (27% to 28%) of homology (1). PDGFRα homodimers bind all PDGF isoforms except those containing PDGF D. PDGFRβ homodimers bind PDGF BB and DD isoforms, as well as the PDGF AB heterodimer. The heteromeric PDGF receptor α/β binds PDGF B, C, and D homodimers, as well as the PDGF AB heterodimer (2). PDGFRα and PDGFRβ can each form heterodimers with EGFR, which is also activated by PDGF (3). Various cells differ in the total number of receptors present and in the receptor subunit composition, which may account for responsive differences among cell types to PDGF binding (4). Ligand binding induces receptor dimerization and autophosphorylation, followed by binding and activation of cytoplasmic SH2 domain-containing signal transduction molecules, such as GRB2, Src, GAP, PI3 kinase, PLCγ, and NCK. A number of different signaling pathways are initiated by activated PDGF receptors and lead to control of cell growth, actin reorganization, migration, and differentiation (5). Tyr751 in the kinase-insert region of PDGFRβ is the docking site for PI3 kinase (6). Phosphorylated pentapeptides derived from Tyr751 of PDGFRβ (pTyr751-Val-Pro-Met-Leu) inhibit the association of the carboxy-terminal SH2 domain of the p85 subunit of PI3 kinase with PDGFRβ (7). Tyr740 is also required for PDGFRβ-mediated PI3 kinase activation (8).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: SHP-2 (PTPN11) is a ubiquitously expressed, nonreceptor protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP). It participates in signaling events downstream of receptors for growth factors, cytokines, hormones, antigens, and extracellular matrices in the control of cell growth, differentiation, migration, and death (1). Activation of SHP-2 and its association with Gab1 is critical for sustained Erk activation downstream of several growth factor receptors and cytokines (2). In addition to its role in Gab1-mediated Erk activation, SHP-2 attenuates EGF-dependent PI3 kinase activation by dephosphorylating Gab1 at p85 binding sites (3). SHP-2 becomes phosphorylated at Tyr542 and Tyr580 in its carboxy-terminus in response to growth factor receptor activation (4). These phosphorylation events are thought to relieve basal inhibition and stimulate SHP-2 tyrosine phosphatase activity (5). Mutations in the corresponding gene result in a pair of clinically similar disorders (Noonan syndrome and LEOPARD syndrome) that may result from abnormal MAPK regulation (6).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: SHP-2 (PTPN11) is a ubiquitously expressed, nonreceptor protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP). It participates in signaling events downstream of receptors for growth factors, cytokines, hormones, antigens, and extracellular matrices in the control of cell growth, differentiation, migration, and death (1). Activation of SHP-2 and its association with Gab1 is critical for sustained Erk activation downstream of several growth factor receptors and cytokines (2). In addition to its role in Gab1-mediated Erk activation, SHP-2 attenuates EGF-dependent PI3 kinase activation by dephosphorylating Gab1 at p85 binding sites (3). SHP-2 becomes phosphorylated at Tyr542 and Tyr580 in its carboxy-terminus in response to growth factor receptor activation (4). These phosphorylation events are thought to relieve basal inhibition and stimulate SHP-2 tyrosine phosphatase activity (5). Mutations in the corresponding gene result in a pair of clinically similar disorders (Noonan syndrome and LEOPARD syndrome) that may result from abnormal MAPK regulation (6).