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Polyclonal Antibody Western Blotting Mrna Binding

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Ribosomal protein L13a (RPL13a, 60S ribosomal protein L13a) is a member of the L13 ribosomal protein family and a structural component of the 60S ribosomal subunit (1). RPL13a appears to play an important role in transcript-specific translational silencing. Interferon-γ induces the phosphorylation of RPL13a and triggers the release of this protein from the 60S ribosomal subunit (2). Free RPL13a protein binds to the GAIT (interferon-γ-activated inhibitor of translation) complex at the 3'-UTR of ceruloplasmin (Cp) mRNA to repress Cp expression (2). RPL13a bound to the GAIT complex interacts with eIF4G, which prevents the recruitment of 43S ribosomal subunit and results in transcript-specific translation suppression (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Cleavage and polyadenylation of pre-mRNA is regulated by a core group of proteins called the cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factors (1,2). The CPSF factors interact with poly(A) polymerase (PAP) to recognize the AAUAAA sequence motif and add poly(A). CPSF can also interact with downstream cleavage factors to precisely cleave the 3’ end of pre-mRNA (2,3). CPSF is brought to 3’ ends by the carboxy-terminal domain of the Rpb1 subunit of the RNA Polymerase II complex, where it dissociates and initiates polyadenylation (4). CPSF has been shown to have numerous interactions with viral proteins. The influenza NS1 viral protein binds to CPSF4 to prevent 3’ end processing of viral RNAs, inhibiting nuclear export (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Butyrate response factor 1 (BRF1; also known as EGF response factor 1 [ERF1], TIS11B, ZFP36L1) and butyrate response factor 2 (BRF2; also known as EGF response factor 2 [ERF2], TIS11D, ZFP36L2) both belong to the TIS11 family of CCCH zinc-finger proteins (1). This family of proteins, which also includes tristetraprolin (TTP), bind to AU-rich elements (ARE) found in the 3'-untranslated regions of mRNAs and promote de-adenylation and rapid degradation by the exosome (2,3). These proteins play a critical role in cell growth control by regulating the mRNA turnover of multiple cytokines, growth factors and cell cycle regulators, including GM-CSF, TNFα, IL-2, IL-3 and IL-6 (4,5). Deregulated ARE-mRNA stability can contribute to both inflammation and oncogenic transformation (6-8). Insulin-induced stabilization of ARE-containing transcripts is mediated by Akt/PKB phosphorylation of BRF1 at Ser92, which results in binding by 14-3-3 protein and inactivation of BRF1 (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: A variety of factors contribute to the important biological event of initiation of translation. The eIF4F complex of translation initiation factors binds to the 5' m7 GTP cap to open up the mRNA secondary structure and allow small ribosome subunit binding (1). eIF4A, an eIF4 complex component that acts as an ATP-dependent RNA helicase, unwinds the secondary structure of the 5' mRNA untranslated region to mediate ribosome binding (2,3). In addition, eIF4A has recently been shown to repress Dpp/BMP signalling in a translation-independent manner in Drosophila (4,5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Fragile X syndrome, a frequent cause of inherited mental retardation, often results from expansion of the CGG trinucleotide repeat in the gene that encodes the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) (1). FMRP (also known as FMR1) and its two autosomal homologs (FXR1 and FXR2) all bind RNA and play a role in the pathogenesis of fragile X syndrome (1-3). Each of these related proteins can associate with one another as well as form homodimers (3). FMRP can act as a translation regulator and is a component of RNAi effector complexes (RISC), suggesting a role in gene silencing (4). In Drosophila, dFMRP associates with Argonaute 2 (Ago2) and Dicer and coimmunoprecipitates with miRNA and siRNA. These results suggest that fragile X syndrome is related to abnormal translation caused by a defect in RNAi-related pathways (5). In addition, FMRP, FXR1, and FXR2 are components of stress granules (SG) and have been implicated in the translational regulation of mRNAs (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: KHSRP, also known as KSRP, is a KH domain-containing AU-rich element (ARE) binding protein (1). It recruits degradation machinery and activates mRNA turnover (2). This protein was previously shown to function as a regulator for splicing (3). KHSRP associates with both the Drosha and Dicer multiprotein complexes (4), and controls the biogenesis of some microRNAs by binding to the terminal loops of these microRNA precursors (3). KHSRP is found in neural and non-neural cell types in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Fragile X syndrome, a frequent cause of inherited mental retardation, often results from expansion of the CGG trinucleotide repeat in the gene that encodes the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) (1). FMRP (also known as FMR1) and its two autosomal homologs (FXR1 and FXR2) all bind RNA and play a role in the pathogenesis of fragile X syndrome (1-3). Each of these related proteins can associate with one another as well as form homodimers (3). FMRP can act as a translation regulator and is a component of RNAi effector complexes (RISC), suggesting a role in gene silencing (4). In Drosophila, dFMRP associates with Argonaute 2 (Ago2) and Dicer and coimmunoprecipitates with miRNA and siRNA. These results suggest that fragile X syndrome is related to abnormal translation caused by a defect in RNAi-related pathways (5). In addition, FMRP, FXR1, and FXR2 are components of stress granules (SG) and have been implicated in the translational regulation of mRNAs (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Insulin-like growth factor-II mRNA-binding proteins (IMPs) belong to a family of zipcode-binding proteins (1,2). Three members of this family, IMP1, IMP2, and IMP3, have been identified (1,2). They contain two RNA recognition motifs, four K homology domains, and were found to function in mRNA localization, turnover, and translation control (1,2). Research studies have implicated these proteins in a variety of physiological and pathological processes, such as growth and development (3), testicular neoplasia (4), and melanocytic neoplasia (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Fragile X syndrome is a genetic disorder characterized by a spectrum of physical and behavioral features and is a frequent form of inherited mental retardation (1). X-linked FMRP (FMR-1) and its two autosomal homologs, FXR1 and FXR2, are polyribosome-associated RNA-binding proteins that are involved in the pathogenesis of fragile X syndrome (1-3). Each of the fragile X proteins can self-associate, as well as form heteromers with the other two related proteins (3). FMRP can act as a translation regulator and is a component of RNAi effector complexes (RISC), suggesting a role in gene silencing (4). The Drosophila homolog of FMRP (dFMRP) associates with Argonaute 2 (Ago2) and Dicer and can coimmunoprecipitate with miRNA and siRNA (5). These results suggest that fragile X syndrome is related to abnormal translation caused by defects in RNAi-related pathways. In addition, FMRP, FXR1, and FXR2 are components of stress granules (SG) and have been implicated in the translational regulation of mRNAs (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein L-like (hnRNP LL) is a nuclear RNA-binding protein that shares 69% amino acid homology with hnRNP L, a component of the hnRNP complex that regulates mRNA formation, packaging, and processing (1). hnRNP LL is induced in activated T cells and functions as a critical regulator of alternative splicing of CD45, a tyrosine phosphatase crucial for T cell development and activation (2). hnRNP LL also regulates the splicing of CD44 and Stat5a (2). The four isoforms of hnRNP LL are generated by alternative splicing and are widely expressed in human tissues (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Quaking (QKI) is a member of the signal transduction and activator of RNA (STAR) protein family of RNA binding proteins (1,2). Mutations in the mouse Qki locus results in impaired myelin formation resulting in tremors (3). QKI proteins exist as homodimers, and disruption of the dimerization process is lethal in mice (2). QKI exists in different isoforms that differ in their C-terminus, resulting in unique subcellular localizations (4). The nuclear isoform of QKI, QKI-5, is involved in regulation of alternative splicing of MAG mRNA, which encodes for a protein important for myelin sheath formation and maintenance (4,5). QKI has also been implicated in schizophrenia and oligodendrocyte differentiation (6). QKI can function as a tumor suppressor, as it is regulated by p53 to stabilize miRNAs that regulate TGF-Β signaling (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The Drosophila piwi gene was identified as being required for the self-renewal of germline stem cells (1). Piwi homologs are well conserved among various species including Arabidopsis, C. elegans, and Homo sapiens (1). Both Miwi and Mili proteins are mouse homologs of Piwi and contain a C-terminal Piwi domain (2). Miwi and Mili bind to Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) in male germ cells and are essential for spermatogenesis in mice (3-5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Drosophila piwi gene was identified as being required for the self-renewal of germline stem cells (1). Piwi homologs are well conserved among various species including Arabidopsis, C. elegans, and Homo sapiens (1). Both Miwi and Mili proteins are mouse homologs of Piwi and contain a C-terminal Piwi domain (2). Miwi and Mili bind to Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) in male germ cells and are essential for spermatogenesis in mice (3-5).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: A variety of factors contribute to the important biological event of initiation of translation. The eIF4F complex of translation initiation factors binds to the 5' m7 GTP cap to open up the mRNA secondary structure and allow small ribosome subunit binding (1). eIF4A, an eIF4 complex component that acts as an ATP-dependent RNA helicase, unwinds the secondary structure of the 5' mRNA untranslated region to mediate ribosome binding (2,3). In addition, eIF4A has recently been shown to repress Dpp/BMP signalling in a translation-independent manner in Drosophila (4,5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Ribosomal protein S3 (rpS3) is a component of the 40S ribosomal subunit and is involved in translation. HSP90 interacts with both the amino-terminus and carboxy-terminus of rpS3, preventing its ubiquitination and degradation and thereby retaining the integrity of the ribosome (1). rpS3 has also been shown to function as an endonuclease during DNA damage repair (2,3). Furthermore, overexpression of rpS3 sensitizes lymphocytic cells to cytokine-induced apoptosis, indicating a third role for rpS3 during apoptosis (4). The functions of rpS3 during DNA damage repair and apoptosis have been mapped to two distinct domains (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Fragile X syndrome is a genetic disorder characterized by a spectrum of physical and behavioral features and is a frequent form of inherited mental retardation (1). X-linked FMRP (FMR-1) and its two autosomal homologs, FXR1 and FXR2, are polyribosome-associated RNA-binding proteins that are involved in the pathogenesis of fragile X syndrome (1-3). Each of the fragile X proteins can self-associate, as well as form heteromers with the other two related proteins (3). FMRP can act as a translation regulator and is a component of RNAi effector complexes (RISC), suggesting a role in gene silencing (4). The Drosophila homolog of FMRP (dFMRP) associates with Argonaute 2 (Ago2) and Dicer and can coimmunoprecipitate with miRNA and siRNA (5). These results suggest that fragile X syndrome is related to abnormal translation caused by defects in RNAi-related pathways. In addition, FMRP, FXR1, and FXR2 are components of stress granules (SG) and have been implicated in the translational regulation of mRNAs (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: hnRNP E1 is a member of the hnRNP family of proteins that are involved in pre-mRNA processing and mRNA export, localization, stability, and translation (1-6). hnRNP E1 exerts a wide range of biological functions, such as transcriptional activation of mouse MOR gene expression (7), attenuation of alternative splicing of GHR pseudoexon expression (8), stabilization of collagen I and II (9), beta-globin (10), and androgen receptor (11) mRNAs, and regulation of translation of various genes including Dab2, ILEI, and Bag-1 (12,13). hnRNP E1 is ubiquitously expressed. Phosphorylation of hnRNP E1 affects its RNA binding affinity (13,14).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: La antigen is recognized by antibodies in patients with autoimmune disorders such as systemic lupus erythematosus and Sjögren's syndrome (1). La antigen binds to the 5'-noncoding region of poliovirus RNA and is an IRES trans-acting factor (1,2). Depletion of La antigen reduces the function of poliovirus IRES in vivo (3). La antigen, when phosphorylated at Ser366, has been shown to associate with nuclear precursor tRNAs and facilitate their processing (4). The nonphosphorylated La antigen interacts with the mRNAs that have 5'-terminal oligopyrimidine (5'TOP) motifs to control protein synthesis (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: C1QBP, also referred to as p32, p33, gC1q receptor (gC1qR), and hyaluronic acid binding protein 1 (HABP1), was originally identified via its binding interactions with Splicing Factor (SF-2) (1). Multiple, diverse binding partners of C1QBP were subsequently identified, including the globular heads of complement component C1q, hyaluronic acid, selected protein kinases (2), the tumor suppressor ARF (3-5), and multiple antigens of bacterial and viral origin (6). Research studies have shown that C1QBP is overexpressed in a number of cancer cell types (7), and has been implicated in the Warburg effect, whereby cancer cells shift their metabolism from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis (7). C1QBP has also been shown to inhibit the Mitochondrial Permeability Transition (MPT) pore, possibly serving a protective function against damage from oxidative stress (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Drosophila piwi gene was identified as being required for the self-renewal of germ-line stem cells (1). Piwi homologs are well conserved among various species including Arabidopsis, C. elegans, and human (1). Miwi and Mili proteins are both mouse homologs of Piwi and contain a C-terminal Piwi domain (2). Miwi and Mili bind to Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) in male germ cells and are essential for spermatogenesis in mouse (3-5).