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Polyclonal Antibody Western Blotting Muscle Cell Development

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Nonmuscle myosin is an actin-based motor protein essential to cell motility, cell division, migration, adhesion, and polarity. The holoenzyme consists of two identical heavy chains and two sets of light chains. The light chains (MLCs) regulate myosin II activity and stability. The heavy chains (NMHCs) are encoded by three genes, MYH9, MYH10, and MYH14, which generate three different nonmuscle myosin II isoforms, IIa, IIb, and IIc, respectively (reviewed in 1). While all three isoforms perform the same enzymatic tasks, binding to and contracting actin filaments coupled to ATP hydrolysis, their cellular functions do not appear to be redundant and they have different subcellular distributions (2-5). The carboxy-terminal tail domain of myosin II is important in isoform-specific subcellular localization (6). Research studies have shown that phosphorylation of myosin IIa at Ser1943 contributes to the regulation of breast cancer cell migration (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Autophagy is a catabolic process for the autophagosomic-lysosomal degradation of bulk cytoplasmic contents (1,2). Autophagy is generally activated by conditions of nutrient deprivation but has also been associated with a number of physiological processes including development, differentiation, neurodegeneration, infection, and cancer (3). The molecular machinery of autophagy was largely discovered in yeast and referred to as autophagy-related (Atg) genes. Formation of the autophagosome involves a ubiquitin-like conjugation system in which Atg12 is covalently bound to Atg5 and targeted to autophagosome vesicles (4-6). This conjugation reaction is mediated by the ubiquitin E1-like enzyme Atg7 and the E2-like enzyme Atg10 (7,8).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Lamins are nuclear membrane structural components that are important in maintaining normal cell functions such as cell cycle control, DNA replication, and chromatin organization (1-3). Lamin A/C is cleaved by caspase-6 and serves as a marker for caspase-6 activation. During apoptosis, lamin A/C is specifically cleaved into a large (41-50 kDa) and a small (28 kDa) fragment (3,4). The cleavage of lamins results in nuclear dysregulation and cell death (5,6).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Lamins are nuclear membrane structural components that are important in maintaining normal cell functions such as cell cycle control, DNA replication, and chromatin organization (1-3). Lamin A/C is cleaved by caspase-6 and serves as a marker for caspase-6 activation. During apoptosis, lamin A/C is specifically cleaved into a large (41-50 kDa) and a small (28 kDa) fragment (3,4). The cleavage of lamins results in nuclear dysregulation and cell death (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1; also known as AOF2 and BHC110) is a nuclear amine oxidase homolog that acts as a histone demethylase and transcription cofactor (1). Gene activation and repression is specifically regulated by the methylation state of distinct histone protein lysine residues. For example, methylation of histone H3 at Lys4 facilitates transcriptional activation by coordinating the recruitment of BPTF, a component of the NURF chromatin remodeling complex, and WDR5, a component of multiple histone methyltransferase complexes (2,3). In contrast, methylation of histone H3 at Lys9 facilitates transcriptional repression by recruiting HP1 (4,5). LSD1 is a component of the CoREST transcriptional co-repressor complex that also contains CoREST, CtBP, HDAC1 and HDAC2. As part of this complex, LSD1 demethylates mono-methyl and di-methyl histone H3 at Lys4 through a FAD-dependent oxidation reaction to facilitate neuronal-specific gene repression in non-neuronal cells (1,6,7). In contrast, LSD1 associates with androgen receptor in human prostate cells to demethylate mono-methyl and di-methyl histone H3 at Lys9 and facilitate androgen receptor-dependent transcriptional activation (8). Therefore, depending on gene context LSD1 can function as either a transcriptional co-repressor or co-activator. LSD1 activity is inhibited by the amine oxidase inhibitors pargyline, deprenyl, clorgyline and tranylcypromine (8).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Dicer is a member of the RNase III family that specifically cleaves double-stranded RNAs to generate microRNAs (miRNAs) (1). After long primary transcript pri-miRNAs are processed to stem-looped pre-miRNAs by Drosha (2), pre-miRNAs are transported to the cytoplasm and further processed by Dicer to produce 22-nucleotide mature miRNAs (3). The mature miRNA then becomes a part of the RNA-Induced Silencing Complex (RISC) and can bind to the 3' UTR of the target mRNA (3).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Lamins are nuclear membrane structural components that are important in maintaining normal cell functions such as cell cycle control, DNA replication, and chromatin organization (1-3). Lamin A/C is cleaved by caspase-6 and serves as a marker for caspase-6 activation. During apoptosis, lamin A/C is specifically cleaved into a large (41-50 kDa) and a small (28 kDa) fragment (3,4). The cleavage of lamins results in nuclear dysregulation and cell death (5,6).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Autophagy is a catabolic process for the autophagosomic-lysosomal degradation of bulk cytoplasmic contents (1,2). Autophagy is generally activated by conditions of nutrient deprivation but has also been associated with a number of physiological processes including development, differentiation, neurodegeneration, infection, and cancer (3). The molecular machinery of autophagy was largely discovered in yeast and referred to as autophagy-related (Atg) genes. Formation of the autophagosome involves a ubiquitin-like conjugation system in which Atg12 is covalently bound to Atg5 and targeted to autophagosome vesicles (4-6). This conjugation reaction is mediated by the ubiquitin E1-like enzyme Atg7 and the E2-like enzyme Atg10 (7,8).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Cyclins are a family of proteins that activate specific cyclin-dependent kinases required for progression through the cell cycle. The entry of all eukaryotic cells into mitosis is regulated by activation of cdc2/cdk1 at the G2/M transition. This activation is a multi-step process that begins with the binding of the regulatory subunit, cyclin B1, to cdc2/cdk1 to form the mitosis-promoting factor (MPF). MPF remains in the inactive state until phosphorylation of cdc2/cdk1 at Thr161 by cdk activating kinase (CAK) (1,2) and dephosphorylation of cdc2/cdk1 at Thr14/Tyr15 by cdc25C (3-5). Five cyclin B1 phosphorylation sites (Ser116, 126, 128, 133, and 147) are located in the cytoplasmic retention signal (CRS) domain and are thought to regulate the translocation of cyclin B1 to the nucleus at the G2/M checkpoint, promoting nuclear accumulation and initiation of mitosis (6-9). While MPF itself can phosphorylate Ser126 and Ser128, polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) phosphorylates cyclin B1 preferentially at Ser133 and possibly at Ser147 (6,10). At the end of mitosis, cyclin B1 is targeted for degradation by the anaphase-promoting complex (APC), allowing for cell cycle progression (11). Research studies have shown that cyclin B1 is overexpressed in breast, prostate, and non-small cell lung cancers (12-14).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Cyclins are a family of proteins that activate specific cyclin-dependent kinases required for progression through the cell cycle. The entry of all eukaryotic cells into mitosis is regulated by activation of cdc2/cdk1 at the G2/M transition. This activation is a multi-step process that begins with the binding of the regulatory subunit, cyclin B1, to cdc2/cdk1 to form the mitosis-promoting factor (MPF). MPF remains in the inactive state until phosphorylation of cdc2/cdk1 at Thr161 by cdk activating kinase (CAK) (1,2) and dephosphorylation of cdc2/cdk1 at Thr14/Tyr15 by cdc25C (3-5). Five cyclin B1 phosphorylation sites (Ser116, 126, 128, 133, and 147) are located in the cytoplasmic retention signal (CRS) domain and are thought to regulate the translocation of cyclin B1 to the nucleus at the G2/M checkpoint, promoting nuclear accumulation and initiation of mitosis (6-9). While MPF itself can phosphorylate Ser126 and Ser128, polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) phosphorylates cyclin B1 preferentially at Ser133 and possibly at Ser147 (6,10). At the end of mitosis, cyclin B1 is targeted for degradation by the anaphase-promoting complex (APC), allowing for cell cycle progression (11). Research studies have shown that cyclin B1 is overexpressed in breast, prostate, and non-small cell lung cancers (12-14).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1; also known as AOF2 and BHC110) is a nuclear amine oxidase homolog that acts as a histone demethylase and transcription cofactor (1). Gene activation and repression is specifically regulated by the methylation state of distinct histone protein lysine residues. For example, methylation of histone H3 at Lys4 facilitates transcriptional activation by coordinating the recruitment of BPTF, a component of the NURF chromatin remodeling complex, and WDR5, a component of multiple histone methyltransferase complexes (2,3). In contrast, methylation of histone H3 at Lys9 facilitates transcriptional repression by recruiting HP1 (4,5). LSD1 is a component of the CoREST transcriptional co-repressor complex that also contains CoREST, CtBP, HDAC1 and HDAC2. As part of this complex, LSD1 demethylates mono-methyl and di-methyl histone H3 at Lys4 through a FAD-dependent oxidation reaction to facilitate neuronal-specific gene repression in non-neuronal cells (1,6,7). In contrast, LSD1 associates with androgen receptor in human prostate cells to demethylate mono-methyl and di-methyl histone H3 at Lys9 and facilitate androgen receptor-dependent transcriptional activation (8). Therefore, depending on gene context LSD1 can function as either a transcriptional co-repressor or co-activator. LSD1 activity is inhibited by the amine oxidase inhibitors pargyline, deprenyl, clorgyline and tranylcypromine (8).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Lamins are nuclear membrane structural components that are important in maintaining normal cell functions such as cell cycle control, DNA replication, and chromatin organization (1-3). Lamin A/C is cleaved by caspase-6 and serves as a marker for caspase-6 activation. During apoptosis, lamin A/C is specifically cleaved into a large (41-50 kDa) and a small (28 kDa) fragment (3,4). The cleavage of lamins results in nuclear dysregulation and cell death (5,6).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Cyclins are a family of proteins that activate specific cyclin-dependent kinases required for progression through the cell cycle. The entry of all eukaryotic cells into mitosis is regulated by activation of cdc2/cdk1 at the G2/M transition. This activation is a multi-step process that begins with the binding of the regulatory subunit, cyclin B1, to cdc2/cdk1 to form the mitosis-promoting factor (MPF). MPF remains in the inactive state until phosphorylation of cdc2/cdk1 at Thr161 by cdk activating kinase (CAK) (1,2) and dephosphorylation of cdc2/cdk1 at Thr14/Tyr15 by cdc25C (3-5). Five cyclin B1 phosphorylation sites (Ser116, 126, 128, 133, and 147) are located in the cytoplasmic retention signal (CRS) domain and are thought to regulate the translocation of cyclin B1 to the nucleus at the G2/M checkpoint, promoting nuclear accumulation and initiation of mitosis (6-9). While MPF itself can phosphorylate Ser126 and Ser128, polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) phosphorylates cyclin B1 preferentially at Ser133 and possibly at Ser147 (6,10). At the end of mitosis, cyclin B1 is targeted for degradation by the anaphase-promoting complex (APC), allowing for cell cycle progression (11). Research studies have shown that cyclin B1 is overexpressed in breast, prostate, and non-small cell lung cancers (12-14).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The megakaryoblastic leukemia proteins 1 and 2 (MKL1, MKL2) are myocardin-related transcription factors (MRTF-A, MRTF-B) that serve as actin-regulated transcription coactivators for the serum response factor (SRF). Interaction between G-actin and MKL proteins retains the coactivator within the cytoplasm of resting cells. Activated Rho-A promotes F-actin assembly and a reduction of the G-actin pool in serum-stimulated cells. This results in the accumulation of MKL proteins in the nucleus, where the coactivator associates with the SRF to activate target gene transcription and mediate multiple cellular processes (1-4). A number of other signaling pathways, including the TGFβ, BMP, and PDGF pathways, also make use of MKL-mediated activation of target gene transcription (5-9). Chromosomal translocations involving the genes encoding MKL1 and MKL2 have been identified in several cases of acute megakaryoblastic leukemia and chondroid lipoma (10-12).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat, Zebrafish

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Actin, a ubiquitous eukaryotic protein, is the major component of the cytoskeleton. At least six isoforms are known in mammals. Nonmuscle β- and γ-actin, also known as cytoplasmic actin, are predominantly expressed in nonmuscle cells, controlling cell structure and motility (1). α-cardiac and α-skeletal actin are expressed in striated cardiac and skeletal muscles, respectively; two smooth muscle actins, α- and γ-actin, are found primarily in vascular smooth muscle and enteric smooth muscle, respectively. These actin isoforms regulate the contractile potential of muscle cells (1). Actin exists mainly as a fibrous polymer, F-actin. In response to cytoskeletal reorganizing signals during processes such as cytokinesis, endocytosis, or stress, cofilin promotes fragmentation and depolymerization of F-actin, resulting in an increase in the monomeric globular form, G-actin (2). The ARP2/3 complex stabilizes F-actin fragments and promotes formation of new actin filaments (2). Research studies have shown that actin is hyperphosphorylated in primary breast tumors (3). Cleavage of actin under apoptotic conditions has been observed in vitro and in cardiac and skeletal muscle, as shown in research studies (4-6). Actin cleavage by caspase-3 may accelerate ubiquitin/proteasome-dependent muscle proteolysis (6).

$303
200 µl
$717
600 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
D. melanogaster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Pig, Rat, S. cerevisiae

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: p38 MAP kinase (MAPK), also called RK (1) or CSBP (2), is the mammalian orthologue of the yeast HOG kinase that participates in a signaling cascade controlling cellular responses to cytokines and stress (1-4). Four isoforms of p38 MAPK, p38α, β, γ (also known as Erk6 or SAPK3), and δ (also known as SAPK4) have been identified. Similar to the SAPK/JNK pathway, p38 MAPK is activated by a variety of cellular stresses including osmotic shock, inflammatory cytokines, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), UV light, and growth factors (1-5). MKK3, MKK6, and SEK activate p38 MAPK by phosphorylation at Thr180 and Tyr182. Activated p38 MAPK has been shown to phosphorylate and activate MAPKAP kinase 2 (3) and to phosphorylate the transcription factors ATF-2 (5), Max (6), and MEF2 (5-8). SB203580 (4-(4-fluorophenyl)-2-(4-methylsulfinylphenyl)-5-(4-pyridyl)-imidazole) is a selective inhibitor of p38 MAPK. This compound inhibits the activation of MAPKAPK-2 by p38 MAPK and subsequent phosphorylation of HSP27 (9). SB203580 inhibits p38 MAPK catalytic activity by binding to the ATP-binding pocket, but does not inhibit phosphorylation of p38 MAPK by upstream kinases (10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: MEF2A is a member of the MEF2 (myocyte enhancer factor 2) family of transcription factors. In mammals, four MEF2A-related genes (MEF2A, MEF2B, MEF2C and MEF2D) encode proteins which exhibit significant amino acid sequence similarity within their DNA binding domains and to a lesser extent throughout the remaining proteins (1). The MEF2 family members were originally described as muscle-specific DNA binding proteins that recognize MEF2 motifs found within the promoters of many muscle-specific genes (2,3). Phosphorylation of MEF2A at Thr312 and Thr319 within the transcription activation domain by p38 MAP kinase enhances MEF2A-MEF2D heterodimer-dependent gene expression (4). On the other hand, apoptotic stimuli (e.g. neurotoxic insult) result in CDK5-dependent phosphorylation of MEF2A at Ser408 within the activation domain, inhibiting MEF2A pro-survival function (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Acetylation of the histone tail causes chromatin to adopt an "open" conformation, allowing increased accessibility of transcription factors to DNA. The identification of histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and their large multiprotein complexes has yielded important insights into how these enzymes regulate transcription (1,2). HAT complexes interact with sequence-specific activator proteins to target specific genes. In addition to histones, HATs can acetylate nonhistone proteins, suggesting multiple roles for these enzymes (3). In contrast, histone deacetylation promotes a "closed" chromatin conformation and typically leads to repression of gene activity (4). Mammalian histone deacetylases can be divided into three classes on the basis of their similarity to various yeast deacetylases (5). Class I proteins (HDACs 1, 2, 3, and 8) are related to the yeast Rpd3-like proteins, those in class II (HDACs 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, and 10) are related to yeast Hda1-like proteins, and class III proteins are related to the yeast protein Sir2. Inhibitors of HDAC activity are now being explored as potential therapeutic cancer agents (6,7).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Acetylation of the histone tail causes chromatin to adopt an "open" conformation, allowing increased accessibility of transcription factors to DNA. The identification of histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and their large multiprotein complexes has yielded important insights into how these enzymes regulate transcription (1,2). HAT complexes interact with sequence-specific activator proteins to target specific genes. In addition to histones, HATs can acetylate nonhistone proteins, suggesting multiple roles for these enzymes (3). In contrast, histone deacetylation promotes a "closed" chromatin conformation and typically leads to repression of gene activity (4). Mammalian histone deacetylases can be divided into three classes on the basis of their similarity to various yeast deacetylases (5). Class I proteins (HDACs 1, 2, 3, and 8) are related to the yeast Rpd3-like proteins, those in class II (HDACs 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, and 10) are related to yeast Hda1-like proteins, and class III proteins are related to the yeast protein Sir2. Inhibitors of HDAC activity are now being explored as potential therapeutic cancer agents (6,7).

$303
100 µl
$717
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: p70 S6 kinase is a mitogen activated Ser/Thr protein kinase that is required for cell growth and G1 cell cycle progression (1,2). p70 S6 kinase phosphorylates the S6 protein of the 40S ribosomal subunit and is involved in translational control of 5' oligopyrimidine tract mRNAs (1). A second isoform, p85 S6 kinase, is derived from the same gene and is identical to p70 S6 kinase except for 23 extra residues at the amino terminus, which encode a nuclear localizing signal (1). Both isoforms lie on a mitogen activated signaling pathway downstream of phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PI-3K) and the target of rapamycin, FRAP/mTOR, a pathway distinct from the Ras/MAP kinase cascade (1). The activity of p70 S6 kinase is controlled by multiple phosphorylation events located within the catalytic, linker and pseudosubstrate domains (1). Phosphorylation of Thr229 in the catalytic domain and Thr389 in the linker domain are most critical for kinase function (1). Phosphorylation of Thr389, however, most closely correlates with p70 kinase activity in vivo (3). Prior phosphorylation of Thr389 is required for the action of phosphoinositide 3-dependent protein kinase 1 (PDK1) on Thr229 (4,5). Phosphorylation of this site is stimulated by growth factors such as insulin, EGF and FGF, as well as by serum and some G-protein-coupled receptor ligands, and is blocked by wortmannin, LY294002 (PI-3K inhibitor) and rapamycin (FRAP/mTOR inhibitor) (1,6,7). Ser411, Thr421 and Ser424 lie within a Ser-Pro-rich region located in the pseudosubstrate region (1). Phosphorylation at these sites is thought to activate p70 S6 kinase via relief of pseudosubstrate suppression (1,2). Another LY294002 and rapamycin sensitive phosphorylation site, Ser371, is an in vitro substrate for mTOR and correlates well with the activity of a partially rapamycin resistant mutant p70 S6 kinase (8).