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Rat Actin Cytoskeleton

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat, Zebrafish

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Actin, a ubiquitous eukaryotic protein, is the major component of the cytoskeleton. At least six isoforms are known in mammals. Nonmuscle β- and γ-actin, also known as cytoplasmic actin, are predominantly expressed in nonmuscle cells, controlling cell structure and motility (1). α-cardiac and α-skeletal actin are expressed in striated cardiac and skeletal muscles, respectively; two smooth muscle actins, α- and γ-actin, are found primarily in vascular smooth muscle and enteric smooth muscle, respectively. These actin isoforms regulate the contractile potential of muscle cells (1). Actin exists mainly as a fibrous polymer, F-actin. In response to cytoskeletal reorganizing signals during processes such as cytokinesis, endocytosis, or stress, cofilin promotes fragmentation and depolymerization of F-actin, resulting in an increase in the monomeric globular form, G-actin (2). The ARP2/3 complex stabilizes F-actin fragments and promotes formation of new actin filaments (2). Research studies have shown that actin is hyperphosphorylated in primary breast tumors (3). Cleavage of actin under apoptotic conditions has been observed in vitro and in cardiac and skeletal muscle, as shown in research studies (4-6). Actin cleavage by caspase-3 may accelerate ubiquitin/proteasome-dependent muscle proteolysis (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Actin, a ubiquitous eukaryotic protein, is the major component of the cytoskeleton. At least six isoforms are known in mammals. Nonmuscle β- and γ-actin, also known as cytoplasmic actin, are predominantly expressed in nonmuscle cells, controlling cell structure and motility (1). α-cardiac and α-skeletal actin are expressed in striated cardiac and skeletal muscles, respectively; two smooth muscle actins, α- and γ-actin, are found primarily in vascular smooth muscle and enteric smooth muscle, respectively. These actin isoforms regulate the contractile potential of muscle cells (1). Actin exists mainly as a fibrous polymer, F-actin. In response to cytoskeletal reorganizing signals during processes such as cytokinesis, endocytosis, or stress, cofilin promotes fragmentation and depolymerization of F-actin, resulting in an increase in the monomeric globular form, G-actin (2). The ARP2/3 complex stabilizes F-actin fragments and promotes formation of new actin filaments (2). Research studies have shown that actin is hyperphosphorylated in primary breast tumors (3). Cleavage of actin under apoptotic conditions has been observed in vitro and in cardiac and skeletal muscle, as shown in research studies (4-6). Actin cleavage by caspase-3 may accelerate ubiquitin/proteasome-dependent muscle proteolysis (6).

$305
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to the carbohydrate groups of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) via its amine groups. The HRP conjugated antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Pan-Actin (D18C11) Rabbit mAb #8456.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Actin, a ubiquitous eukaryotic protein, is the major component of the cytoskeleton. At least six isoforms are known in mammals. Nonmuscle β- and γ-actin, also known as cytoplasmic actin, are predominantly expressed in nonmuscle cells, controlling cell structure and motility (1). α-cardiac and α-skeletal actin are expressed in striated cardiac and skeletal muscles, respectively; two smooth muscle actins, α- and γ-actin, are found primarily in vascular smooth muscle and enteric smooth muscle, respectively. These actin isoforms regulate the contractile potential of muscle cells (1). Actin exists mainly as a fibrous polymer, F-actin. In response to cytoskeletal reorganizing signals during processes such as cytokinesis, endocytosis, or stress, cofilin promotes fragmentation and depolymerization of F-actin, resulting in an increase in the monomeric globular form, G-actin (2). The ARP2/3 complex stabilizes F-actin fragments and promotes formation of new actin filaments (2). Research studies have shown that actin is hyperphosphorylated in primary breast tumors (3). Cleavage of actin under apoptotic conditions has been observed in vitro and in cardiac and skeletal muscle, as shown in research studies (4-6). Actin cleavage by caspase-3 may accelerate ubiquitin/proteasome-dependent muscle proteolysis (6).

$303
100 µl
$717
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The ezrin, radixin, and moesin (ERM) proteins function as linkers between the plasma membrane and the actin cytoskeleton and are involved in cell adhesion, membrane ruffling, and microvilli formation (1). ERM proteins undergo intra or intermolecular interaction between their amino- and carboxy-terminal domains, existing as inactive cytosolic monomers or dimers (2). Phosphorylation at a carboxy-terminal threonine residue (Thr567 of ezrin, Thr564 of radixin, Thr558 of moesin) disrupts the amino- and carboxy-terminal association and may play a key role in regulating ERM protein conformation and function (3,4). Phosphorylation at Thr567 of ezrin is required for cytoskeletal rearrangements and oncogene-induced transformation (5). Ezrin is also phosphorylated at tyrosine residues upon growth factor stimulation. Phosphorylation of Tyr353 of ezrin transmits a survival signal during epithelial differentiation (6).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Peptide ELISA (DELFIA), Western Blotting

Background: The ezrin, radixin, and moesin (ERM) proteins function as linkers between the plasma membrane and the actin cytoskeleton and are involved in cell adhesion, membrane ruffling, and microvilli formation (1). ERM proteins undergo intra or intermolecular interaction between their amino- and carboxy-terminal domains, existing as inactive cytosolic monomers or dimers (2). Phosphorylation at a carboxy-terminal threonine residue (Thr567 of ezrin, Thr564 of radixin, Thr558 of moesin) disrupts the amino- and carboxy-terminal association and may play a key role in regulating ERM protein conformation and function (3,4). Phosphorylation at Thr567 of ezrin is required for cytoskeletal rearrangements and oncogene-induced transformation (5). Ezrin is also phosphorylated at tyrosine residues upon growth factor stimulation. Phosphorylation of Tyr353 of ezrin transmits a survival signal during epithelial differentiation (6).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The ezrin, radixin, and moesin (ERM) proteins function as linkers between the plasma membrane and the actin cytoskeleton and are involved in cell adhesion, membrane ruffling, and microvilli formation (1). ERM proteins undergo intra or intermolecular interaction between their amino- and carboxy-terminal domains, existing as inactive cytosolic monomers or dimers (2). Phosphorylation at a carboxy-terminal threonine residue (Thr567 of ezrin, Thr564 of radixin, Thr558 of moesin) disrupts the amino- and carboxy-terminal association and may play a key role in regulating ERM protein conformation and function (3,4). Phosphorylation at Thr567 of ezrin is required for cytoskeletal rearrangements and oncogene-induced transformation (5). Ezrin is also phosphorylated at tyrosine residues upon growth factor stimulation. Phosphorylation of Tyr353 of ezrin transmits a survival signal during epithelial differentiation (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The ezrin, radixin, and moesin (ERM) proteins function as linkers between the plasma membrane and the actin cytoskeleton and are involved in cell adhesion, membrane ruffling, and microvilli formation (1). ERM proteins undergo intra or intermolecular interaction between their amino- and carboxy-terminal domains, existing as inactive cytosolic monomers or dimers (2). Phosphorylation at a carboxy-terminal threonine residue (Thr567 of ezrin, Thr564 of radixin, Thr558 of moesin) disrupts the amino- and carboxy-terminal association and may play a key role in regulating ERM protein conformation and function (3,4). Phosphorylation at Thr567 of ezrin is required for cytoskeletal rearrangements and oncogene-induced transformation (5). Ezrin is also phosphorylated at tyrosine residues upon growth factor stimulation. Phosphorylation of Tyr353 of ezrin transmits a survival signal during epithelial differentiation (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Filamins are a family of dimeric actin binding proteins that function as structural components of cell adhesion sites. They also serve as a scaffold for subcellular targeting of signaling molecules (1). The actin binding domain (α-actinin domain) located at the amino terminus is followed by as many as 24 tandem repeats of about 96 residues and the dimerization domain is located at the carboxy terminus. In addition to actin filaments, filamins associate with other structural and signaling molecules such as β-integrins, Rho/Rac/Cdc42, PKC and the insulin receptor, primarily through the carboxy-terminal dimerization domain (1-3). Filamin A, the most abundant, and filamin B are widely expressed isoforms, while filamin C is predominantly expressed in muscle (1). Filamin A is phosphorylated by PAK1 at Ser2152, which is required for PAK1-mediated actin cytoskeleton reorganization (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Gelsolin (actin-depolymerizing factor, ADF, AGEL, Brevin) is an 83 kDa protein that shares structural and functional homology to villin and adseverin/scinderin (1,2). Gelsolin plays an important role in actin filament assembly by capping and severing actin proteins in a Ca2+-dependent manner (3,4). Gelsolin is important for cellular events (e.g., membrane ruffling, chemotaxis, ciliogenesis) that require cytoskeletal remodeling (3). Accordingly, cells from gelsolin knockout mice exhibit motility defects, including a failure to ruffle in response to growth factor stimulation (5,6). In humans, defects in gelsolin have been linked to amyloidosis type 5 (AMYL5), a hereditary disease characterized by cranial neuropathy, which appears to result from gelsolin amyloid deposition (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Cofilin and actin-depolymerization factor (ADF) are members of a family of essential conserved small actin-binding proteins that play pivotal roles in cytokinesis, endocytosis, embryonic development, stress response, and tissue regeneration (1). In response to stimuli, cofilin promotes the regeneration of actin filaments by severing preexisting filaments (2). The severing activity of cofilin is inhibited by LIMK or TESK phosphorylation at Ser3 of cofilin (3-5). Phosphorylation at Ser3 also regulates cofilin translocation from the nucleus to the cytoplasm (6).

$348
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology® antibody is conjugated to the carbohydrate groups of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) via its amine groups. The HRP conjugated antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Cofilin (D3F9) XP® Rabbit mAb #5175.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Dog, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Cofilin and actin-depolymerization factor (ADF) are members of a family of essential conserved small actin-binding proteins that play pivotal roles in cytokinesis, endocytosis, embryonic development, stress response, and tissue regeneration (1). In response to stimuli, cofilin promotes the regeneration of actin filaments by severing preexisting filaments (2). The severing activity of cofilin is inhibited by LIMK or TESK phosphorylation at Ser3 of cofilin (3-5). Phosphorylation at Ser3 also regulates cofilin translocation from the nucleus to the cytoplasm (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Fascin is a monomeric, globular protein that plays a central role in regulating the structure and function of the cortical actin cytoskeleton (1). Fascin promotes cross-linkage of parallel actin filaments during the formation of cell protrusions (lamellipodia and filopodia), and therefore plays an important role in regulating cell migration (2). It has been reported that fascin may also regulate filopodia formation by a mechanism independent of its actin-bundling functions (3), though less is known about this mechanism of action. Research studies have shown that increased fascin expression is associated with increased motility and invasiveness of neoplastic cells, including breast, colon, prostate, and esophageal squamous cell carcinomas (4-6). Fascin binds to the armadillo-repeat domain of β-catenin in vitro and in vivo, and has been shown to co-localize with β-catenin and cadherins at the leading edge of migratory cells (7).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Filamins are a family of dimeric actin binding proteins that function as structural components of cell adhesion sites. They also serve as a scaffold for subcellular targeting of signaling molecules (1). The actin binding domain (α-actinin domain) located at the amino terminus is followed by as many as 24 tandem repeats of about 96 residues and the dimerization domain is located at the carboxy terminus. In addition to actin filaments, filamins associate with other structural and signaling molecules such as β-integrins, Rho/Rac/Cdc42, PKC and the insulin receptor, primarily through the carboxy-terminal dimerization domain (1-3). Filamin A, the most abundant, and filamin B are widely expressed isoforms, while filamin C is predominantly expressed in muscle (1). Filamin A is phosphorylated by PAK1 at Ser2152, which is required for PAK1-mediated actin cytoskeleton reorganization (4).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Cofilin and actin-depolymerization factor (ADF) are members of a family of essential conserved small actin-binding proteins that play pivotal roles in cytokinesis, endocytosis, embryonic development, stress response, and tissue regeneration (1). In response to stimuli, cofilin promotes the regeneration of actin filaments by severing preexisting filaments (2). The severing activity of cofilin is inhibited by LIMK or TESK phosphorylation at Ser3 of cofilin (3-5). Phosphorylation at Ser3 also regulates cofilin translocation from the nucleus to the cytoplasm (6).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
$717
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Cofilin and actin-depolymerization factor (ADF) are members of a family of essential conserved small actin-binding proteins that play pivotal roles in cytokinesis, endocytosis, embryonic development, stress response, and tissue regeneration (1). In response to stimuli, cofilin promotes the regeneration of actin filaments by severing preexisting filaments (2). The severing activity of cofilin is inhibited by LIMK or TESK phosphorylation at Ser3 of cofilin (3-5). Phosphorylation at Ser3 also regulates cofilin translocation from the nucleus to the cytoplasm (6).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Nonmuscle myosin is an actin-based motor protein essential to cell motility, cell division, migration, adhesion, and polarity. The holoenzyme consists of two identical heavy chains and two sets of light chains. The light chains (MLCs) regulate myosin II activity and stability. The heavy chains (NMHCs) are encoded by three genes, MYH9, MYH10, and MYH14, which generate three different nonmuscle myosin II isoforms, IIa, IIb, and IIc, respectively (reviewed in 1). While all three isoforms perform the same enzymatic tasks, binding to and contracting actin filaments coupled to ATP hydrolysis, their cellular functions do not appear to be redundant and they have different subcellular distributions (2-5). The carboxy-terminal tail domain of myosin II is important in isoform-specific subcellular localization (6). Research studies have shown that phosphorylation of myosin IIa at Ser1943 contributes to the regulation of breast cancer cell migration (7).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Dog, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Cofilin and actin-depolymerization factor (ADF) are members of a family of essential conserved small actin-binding proteins that play pivotal roles in cytokinesis, endocytosis, embryonic development, stress response, and tissue regeneration (1). In response to stimuli, cofilin promotes the regeneration of actin filaments by severing preexisting filaments (2). The severing activity of cofilin is inhibited by LIMK or TESK phosphorylation at Ser3 of cofilin (3-5). Phosphorylation at Ser3 also regulates cofilin translocation from the nucleus to the cytoplasm (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Actin proteins are major components of the eukaryotic cytoskeleton. At least six vertebrate actin isoforms have been identified. The cytoplasmic β- and γ-actin proteins are referred to as “non-muscle” actin proteins as they are predominantly expressed in non-muscle cells where they control cell structure and motility (1). The α-cardiac and α-skeletal actin proteins are expressed in striated cardiac and skeletal muscles, respectively. The smooth muscle α-actin and γ-actin proteins are found primarily in vascular smooth muscle and enteric smooth muscle, respectively. The α-smooth muscle actin (ACTA2) is also known as aortic smooth muscle actin. These actin isoforms regulate the contractile potential of muscle cells (1).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 488 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct immuno fluorescence analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated α-Smooth Muscle Actin (1A4) Mouse mAb #56856.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen)

Background: Actin proteins are major components of the eukaryotic cytoskeleton. At least six vertebrate actin isoforms have been identified. The cytoplasmic β- and γ-actin proteins are referred to as “non-muscle” actin proteins as they are predominantly expressed in non-muscle cells where they control cell structure and motility (1). The α-cardiac and α-skeletal actin proteins are expressed in striated cardiac and skeletal muscles, respectively. The smooth muscle α-actin and γ-actin proteins are found primarily in vascular smooth muscle and enteric smooth muscle, respectively. The α-smooth muscle actin (ACTA2) is also known as aortic smooth muscle actin. These actin isoforms regulate the contractile potential of muscle cells (1).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Actin proteins are major components of the eukaryotic cytoskeleton. At least six vertebrate actin isoforms have been identified. The cytoplasmic β- and γ-actin proteins are referred to as “non-muscle” actin proteins as they are predominantly expressed in non-muscle cells where they control cell structure and motility (1). The α-cardiac and α-skeletal actin proteins are expressed in striated cardiac and skeletal muscles, respectively. The smooth muscle α-actin and γ-actin proteins are found primarily in vascular smooth muscle and enteric smooth muscle, respectively. The α-smooth muscle actin (ACTA2) is also known as aortic smooth muscle actin. These actin isoforms regulate the contractile potential of muscle cells (1).