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Rat Glycerol Transport

Also showing Mouse Glycerol Transport

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Aquaporin 2 (AQP2) is a water transport protein that forms water channels in kidney tubules and plays a predominant role in controlling organism water homeostasis (1). Members of the aquaporin family are multiple pass transmembrane proteins that form homotetramers to facilitate the flow of water across the plasma membrane. At least thirteen aquaporins have been indentified to date (AQP0 through AQP12) and together this family of small, hydrophobic proteins plays a role in an array of biological processes that include urine formation, cell motility, fertilization, cell junction formation and regulation of overall water homeostasis (2). AQP2 tetramers form water channels that facilitate water transport and excretion in the kidney (3). This transport protein is localized to the plasma membrane is response to endocrine signaling. Posterior pituitary hormones arginine vasopressin (AVP) and ADH regulate osmotic water cell permeability by triggering phosphorylation and subsequent exocytosis of AQP2 (1,4). Mutations in the corresponding AQP2 gene cause a rare form of diabetes known as nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. This autosomal dominant disorder is characterized by abnormal water reabsorption by kidney tubules due, in part, to either nonfunctional or mislocalized AQP2 protein (5).

$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Aquaporins (AQP) are integral membrane proteins that serve as channels in the transfer of water and small solutes across the membrane. There are 13 isoforms of AQP that express in different types of cells and tissues (1,2). AQP1 is found in blood vessels, kidney, eye, and ear. AQP2 is found in the kidney, and it has been shown that the lack of AQP2 results in diabetes (1,3). AQP4 is present in the brain, where it is enriched in astrocytes (1,2,4). AQP5 is found in the salivary and lacrimal gland, AQP6 in intracellular vesicles in the kidney, AQP7 in adipocytes, AQP8 in kidney, testis, and liver, AQP9 is present in liver and leukocytes and AQP10-11 in the intestine (1,3,4). AQPs are essential for the function of cells and organs. It has been shown that AQP1 and AQP4 regulate the water homeostasis in astrocytes, preventing cerebral edema caused by solute imbalance (5). Several studies have shown the involvement of AQPs in the development of inflammatory processes, including cells of innate and adaptive immunity (6,7).