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Rat Protein Polyubiquitination

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Ubiquitin is a conserved polypeptide unit that plays an important role in the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Ubiquitin can be covalently linked to many cellular proteins by the ubiquitination process, which targets proteins for degradation by the 26S proteasome. Three components are involved in the target protein-ubiquitin conjugation process. Ubiquitin is first activated by forming a thiolester complex with the activation component E1; the activated ubiquitin is subsequently transferred to the ubiquitin-carrier protein E2, then from E2 to ubiquitin ligase E3 for final delivery to the epsilon-NH2 of the target protein lysine residue (1-3). The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway has been implicated in a wide range of normal biological processes and in disease-related abnormalities. Several proteins such as IκB, p53, cdc25A, and Bcl-2 have been shown to be targets for the ubiquitin-proteasome process as part of regulation of cell cycle progression, differentiation, cell stress response, and apoptosis (4-7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: The ubiquitin-conjugating (UBC) enzymes HR6A and HR6B are the mammalian orthologues of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rad6 gene products (1). In S. cerevisiae, Rad6 facilitates cell cycle progression and ubiquitinates histone H2B (2,3). In vivo phosphorylation of HR6A Ser120 by cyclin-dependent kinases is thought to be important for the coordination and timing of ubiquitination events involved in cell cycle progression (4). In response to DNA damage, HR6A is known to interact physically with p53 and p14ARF, but knockout mice lacking HR6A or HR6B exhibit normal DNA damage responses (5,6). HR6B knockout males exhibit defective spermatogenesis, while HR6A knockout females fail to produce viable offspring (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: HDAC6 is a class II histone deacetylase enzyme localized to the cytoplasm and associated with the microtubule network (1). It is involved in the regulation of many cellular processes, including cell migration, immune synapse formation, viral infection, and degradation of misfolded proteins (1). HDAC6 contains two tandem catalytic domains that facilitate the deacetylation of multiple protein substrates, including histones and non-histone proteins such as tubulin, cortactin, and HSP90. Despite the ability to deacetylate histone proteins in vitro, there is no evidence for HDAC6-mediated deacetylation of histones in vivo (2,3). The acetylation/deacetylation of tubulin on Lys40 regulates binding and motility of the kinesin-1 motor protein and subsequent transport of cargo proteins such as JNK-interacting protein 1 (JIP1) (4). The acetylation/deacetylation of cortactin regulates cell motility by modulating the binding of cortactin to F-actin (5). Acetylation/deacetylation of HSP90 modulates chaperone complex activity by regulating the binding of an essential cochaperone protein, p23 (6,7). In addition to its role as a protein deacetylase, HDAC6 functions as a component of the aggresome, a proteinaceous inclusion body that forms in response to an accumulation of misfolded or partially denatured proteins (8). Formation of the aggresome is a protective response that sequesters cytotoxic protein aggregates for eventual autophagic clearance from the cell. HDAC6 contains a zinc finger ubiquitin-binding domain that binds both mono- and poly-ubiquitinated proteins (8). HDAC6 binds to both poly-ubiquitinated misfolded proteins and dynein motors, facilitating the transport of misfolded proteins to the aggresome (9,10). HDAC6 is also required for subsequent recruitment of the autophagic machinery and clearance of aggresomes from the cell (11). Thus, HDAC6 plays a key role in the protection against the deleterious effects of pathological protein aggregation that occurs in various diseases, such as neurodegenerative Huntington’s disease (11).

$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: IRAP (also known as LNPEP) was originally described as an insulin-responsive aminopeptidase found in Glut4-containing vesicles (1). It is essentially always in the same compartments as Glut4 and has identical insulin-stimulated translocation patterns as Glut4 (2). IRAP is therefore considered to be a surrogate marker for Glut4 (2). IRAP was later found to be a critical enzyme that regulates the expression and activity of several essential hormones and regulatory proteins, including the Glut4 transporter (3,4). This membrane associated, zinc-dependent cystinyl aminopeptidase acts as both a receptor for angiotensin IV as well as the enzyme that catalyzes the synthesis of this essential hormone from its angiotensinogen precursor (5). IRAP catalyzes the hydrolysis of several peptide hormones, including oxytocin and vasopressin (4). Abnormal IRAP expression or activity is associated with several forms of cancer in humans, including renal and endometrial cancers (6,7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Western Blotting

Background: Core-binding factor subunit β (CBFβ) is a non-DNA binding transcription factor subunit that associates with and regulates the DNA binding activity of RUNX1, RUNX2, and RUNX3 (1). CBFβ is ubiquitously expressed and has been implicated in a variety of developmental processes including hematapoiesis, T cell development, chondrogenesis, and bone formation (2-7). In addition, investigators have identified CBFβ as one of the most frequently translocated genes in leukemia (8) and research studies have found it to be required for HIV immune evasion (9,10). CBFβ interacts with the viral protein VIF and triggers assembly of a ubiquitin ligase complex that targets the retroviral inhibitor APOBEC3G for degradation (9,10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Tripeptidyl-peptidase 2 (TPP2) is a well-conserved subtilisin-like amino peptidase that is expressed predominantly in the cytoplasmic compartment (1,2). The amino-terminal region of TPP2 harbors a catalytic triad that is characteristic of serine proteases and allows for TPP2 cleavage of tripeptides from the free amino terminus of oligopeptide substrates (3). TPP2 is a large (>5MDa) homooligomeric protease in which proteolytic activity is regulated by subunit oligomerization (4,5). While TPP2 plays a general role in amino acid homeostasis, research studies demonstrate that TPP2 is involved in MHC class I antigen presentation (6,7) and DNA-damage repair (8). TPP2 activity is required for the survival of Burkitt's lymphoma cells, suggesting a possible role for TPP2 in oncogenesis (9). Additional research studies show that TPP2 proteolytic activity is important for regulating lysosome abundance and glycolytic metabolism and that TPP2 deficiency leads to defects in adaptive immunity, innate immunity, and nervous system development (10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: In mammalian cells, the significance of histone H2B ubiquitination in chromatin epigenetics came from the identification of the budding yeast protein Bre1 (1,2). Together with the ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme Rad6, Bre1 serves as the E3 ligase in the monoubiquitination of the yeast histone H2B within transcribed regions of chromatin (1-3). Subsequently, the mammalian orthologs of yeast Bre1, RNF20 and RNF40, were identified (4,5). These two proteins form a tight heterodimer that acts as the major E3 ligase responsible for histone H2B monoubiquitination at Lys120 in mammalian cells, a modification linked to RNA Pol II-dependent transcription elongation in undamaged cells. Researchers have shown that DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are also capable of inducing monoubiquitination of H2B. This process depends upon the recruitment to DSB sites, as well as ATM-dependent phosphorylation of the RNF20-RNF40 heterodimer, thus highlighting a role for this E3 ligase in DSB repair pathways (6). Indeed, investigators have shown that loss of RNF20-RNF40 function promotes replication stress and chromosomal instability, which may constitute an early step in malignant transformation that precedes cell invasion (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The 20S proteasome is the major proteolytic enzyme complex involved in intracellular protein degradation. PA700, PA28, and PA200 are three major protein complexes that function as activators of the 20S proteasome. There are three evolutionarily conserved subunits of PA28: PA28α (PSME1), PA28β (PSME2), and PA28γ (PSME3) (1,2). PA28α and PA28β form a heteroheptameric complex and function by binding to the 20S complex at its opening site(s). The PA28α/β complex is present throughout the cell and participates in MHC class I antigen presentation by promoting the generation of antigenic peptides from foreign proteins (2). PA28γ exists in the form of a homoheptamer and is mainly located in the nucleus. The PA28γ complex exerts its function by binding and guiding specific nuclear target proteins to the 20S proteasome for further degradation (3,4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The 20S proteasome is the major proteolytic enzyme complex involved in intracellular protein degradation. PA700, PA28, and PA200 are three major protein complexes that function as activators of the 20S proteasome. There are three evolutionarily conserved subunits of PA28: PA28α (PSME1), PA28β (PSME2), and PA28γ (PSME3) (1,2). PA28α and PA28β form a heteroheptameric complex and function by binding to the 20S complex at its opening site(s). The PA28α/β complex is present throughout the cell and participates in MHC class I antigen presentation by promoting the generation of antigenic peptides from foreign proteins (2). PA28γ exists in the form of a homoheptamer and is mainly located in the nucleus. The PA28γ complex exerts its function by binding and guiding specific nuclear target proteins to the 20S proteasome for further degradation (3,4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: The 20S proteasome is the major proteolytic enzyme complex involved in intracellular protein degradation. It consists of four stacked rings, each with seven distinct subunits. The two outer layers are identical rings composed of α subunits (called PSMAs), and the two inner layers are identical rings composed of β subunits. While the catalytic sites are located on the β rings (1-3), the α subunits are important for assembly and as binding sites for regulatory proteins (4). Seven different α and ten different β proteasome genes have been identified in mammals (5). PA700, PA28, and PA200 are three major protein complexes that function as activators of the 20S proteasome. PA700 binds polyubiquitin with high affinity and associates with the 20S proteasome to form the 26S proteasome, which preferentially degrades poly-ubiquitinated proteins (1-3). The proteasome has a broad substrate spectrum that includes cell cycle regulators, signaling molecules, tumor suppressors, and transcription factors. By controlling the degradation of these intracellular proteins, the proteasome functions in cell cycle regulation, cancer development, immune responses, protein folding, and disease progression (6-9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: The 20S proteasome is the major proteolytic enzyme complex involved in intracellular protein degradation. It consists of four stacked rings, each with seven distinct subunits. The two outer layers are identical rings composed of α subunits (called PSMAs), and the two inner layers are identical rings composed of β subunits. While the catalytic sites are located on the β rings (1-3), the α subunits are important for assembly and as binding sites for regulatory proteins (4). Seven different α and ten different β proteasome genes have been identified in mammals (5). PA700, PA28, and PA200 are three major protein complexes that function as activators of the 20S proteasome. PA700 binds polyubiquitin with high affinity and associates with the 20S proteasome to form the 26S proteasome, which preferentially degrades poly-ubiquitinated proteins (1-3). The proteasome has a broad substrate spectrum that includes cell cycle regulators, signaling molecules, tumor suppressors, and transcription factors. By controlling the degradation of these intracellular proteins, the proteasome functions in cell cycle regulation, cancer development, immune responses, protein folding, and disease progression (6-9).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP) family consists of an evolutionarily conserved group of apoptosis inhibitors containing a conserved 70 amino acid BIR (baculovirus inhibitor repeat) domain (1,2). Human members of this family include c-IAP1, c-IAP2, XIAP, survivin, livin, and NAIP. Overexpression of IAP family members, particularly survivin and livin, in cancer cell lines and primary tumors suggests an important role for these proteins in cancer progression (3-5). In general, the IAP proteins function through direct interactions to inhibit the activity of several caspases, including caspase-3, caspase-7, and caspase-9 (5,6). In addition, binding of IAP family members to the mitochondrial protein Smac blocks their interaction with caspase-9, thereby allowing the processing and activation of the caspase (2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Checkpoint with forkhead and RING finger domains protein (CHFR) is an E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase that regulates cell cycle progression. In response to microtubule stress, CHFR delays the transition into mitosis by excluding cyclin B1 from the nucleus prior to chromosome condensation (1). Marked reduction of CHFR expression was detected in primary tumors and decreased CHFR expression was linked to promoter hypermethylation (1-4). Restoration of CHFR expression by treatment with the microtubule stress agent nocodazole and the methyltransferase inhibitor 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine has been reported (4,5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The 20S proteasome is the major proteolytic enzyme complex involved in intracellular protein degradation. PA700, PA28, and PA200 are three major protein complexes that function as activators of the 20S proteasome. There are three evolutionarily conserved subunits of PA28: PA28α (PSME1), PA28β (PSME2), and PA28γ (PSME3) (1,2). PA28α and PA28β form a heteroheptameric complex and function by binding to the 20S complex at its opening site(s). The PA28α/β complex is present throughout the cell and participates in MHC class I antigen presentation by promoting the generation of antigenic peptides from foreign proteins (2). PA28γ exists in the form of a homoheptamer and is mainly located in the nucleus. The PA28γ complex exerts its function by binding and guiding specific nuclear target proteins to the 20S proteasome for further degradation (3,4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The 20S proteasome is the major proteolytic enzyme complex involved in intracellular protein degradation. It consists of four stacked rings, each with seven distinct subunits. The two outer layers are identical rings composed of α subunits (called PSMAs), and the two inner layers are identical rings composed of β subunits. While the catalytic sites are located on the β rings (1-3), the α subunits are important for assembly and as binding sites for regulatory proteins (4). Seven different α and ten different β proteasome genes have been identified in mammals (5). PA700, PA28, and PA200 are three major protein complexes that function as activators of the 20S proteasome. PA700 binds polyubiquitin with high affinity and associates with the 20S proteasome to form the 26S proteasome, which preferentially degrades poly-ubiquitinated proteins (1-3). The proteasome has a broad substrate spectrum that includes cell cycle regulators, signaling molecules, tumor suppressors, and transcription factors. By controlling the degradation of these intracellular proteins, the proteasome functions in cell cycle regulation, cancer development, immune responses, protein folding, and disease progression (6-9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The 26S proteasome is a highly abundant proteolytic complex involved in the degradation of ubiquitinated substrate proteins. It consists largely of two sub-complexes, the 20S catalytic core particle (CP) and the 19S/PA700 regulatory particle (RP) that can cap either end of the CP. The CP consists of two stacked heteroheptameric β-rings (β1-7) that contain three catalytic β-subunits and are flanked on either side by two heteroheptameric α-rings (α1-7). The RP includes a base and a lid, each having multiple subunits. The base, in part, is composed of a heterohexameric ring of ATPase subunits belonging to the AAA (ATPases Associated with diverse cellular Activities) family. The ATPase subunits function to unfold the substrate and open the gate formed by the α-subunits, thus exposing the unfolded substrate to the catalytic β-subunits. The lid consists of ubiquitin receptors and DUBs that function in recruitment of ubiquitinated substrates and modification of ubiquitin chain topology (1,2). Other modulators of proteasome activity, such as PA28/11S REG, can also bind to the end of the 20S CP and activate it (1,2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The 26S proteasome is a highly abundant proteolytic complex involved in the degradation of ubiquitinated substrate proteins. It consists largely of two sub-complexes, the 20S catalytic core particle (CP) and the 19S/PA700 regulatory particle (RP) that can cap either end of the CP. The CP consists of two stacked heteroheptameric β-rings (β1-7) that contain three catalytic β-subunits and are flanked on either side by two heteroheptameric α-rings (α1-7). The RP includes a base and a lid, each having multiple subunits. The base, in part, is composed of a heterohexameric ring of ATPase subunits belonging to the AAA (ATPases Associated with diverse cellular Activities) family. The ATPase subunits function to unfold the substrate and open the gate formed by the α-subunits, thus exposing the unfolded substrate to the catalytic β-subunits. The lid consists of ubiquitin receptors and DUBs that function in recruitment of ubiquitinated substrates and modification of ubiquitin chain topology (1,2). Other modulators of proteasome activity, such as PA28/11S REG, can also bind to the end of the 20S CP and activate it (1,2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase ARIH2 (TRIAD1) is an Ariadne subfamily ligase involved in the polyubiquitination of proteins designated for proteasomal degradation. The TRIAD1 nuclear protein contains an amino-terminal acidic region, a pair of RING fingers, two carboxyl-terminal coiled coil domains and a novel C6HC DRIL/IBR domain located between the RING fingers. Together, the paired RING fingers and DRIL/IBR domain form a highly conserved TRIAD (two RING fingers and DRIL) domain (1). Research studies suggest that TRIAD1 mediates both Lys48 and Lys63 protein polyubiquitination and acts as a negative regulator of myelopoiesis. TRIAD1 ubiquitin ligase inhibits myeloid cell proliferation by mediating protein ubiquitination through the ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes UbcH7 and UbcH13 (2,3). Experimental deletion of TRIAD1 in mice has a lethal effect, leading to death at the embryonic stage or later due to a severe, multi-organ inflammatory response. Results indicate that TRIAD1 binds IκBβ in dendritic cells and promotes the degradation of the NF-κB inhibitor (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The 26S proteasome is a highly abundant proteolytic complex involved in the degradation of ubiquitinated substrate proteins. It consists largely of two sub-complexes, the 20S catalytic core particle (CP) and the 19S/PA700 regulatory particle (RP) that can cap either end of the CP. The CP consists of two stacked heteroheptameric β-rings (β1-7) that contain three catalytic β-subunits and are flanked on either side by two heteroheptameric α-rings (α1-7). The RP includes a base and a lid, each having multiple subunits. The base, in part, is composed of a heterohexameric ring of ATPase subunits belonging to the AAA (ATPases Associated with diverse cellular Activities) family. The ATPase subunits function to unfold the substrate and open the gate formed by the α-subunits, thus exposing the unfolded substrate to the catalytic β-subunits. The lid consists of ubiquitin receptors and DUBs that function in recruitment of ubiquitinated substrates and modification of ubiquitin chain topology (1,2). Other modulators of proteasome activity, such as PA28/11S REG, can also bind to the end of the 20S CP and activate it (1,2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The 26S proteasome is a highly abundant proteolytic complex involved in the degradation of ubiquitinated substrate proteins. It consists largely of two sub-complexes, the 20S catalytic core particle (CP) and the 19S/PA700 regulatory particle (RP) that can cap either end of the CP. The CP consists of two stacked heteroheptameric β-rings (β1-7) that contain three catalytic β-subunits and are flanked on either side by two heteroheptameric α-rings (α1-7). The RP includes a base and a lid, each having multiple subunits. The base, in part, is composed of a heterohexameric ring of ATPase subunits belonging to the AAA (ATPases Associated with diverse cellular Activities) family. The ATPase subunits function to unfold the substrate and open the gate formed by the α-subunits, thus exposing the unfolded substrate to the catalytic β-subunits. The lid consists of ubiquitin receptors and DUBs that function in recruitment of ubiquitinated substrates and modification of ubiquitin chain topology (1,2). Other modulators of proteasome activity, such as PA28/11S REG, can also bind to the end of the 20S CP and activate it (1,2).