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Rat Regulation of the Force of Heart Contraction

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat, Zebrafish

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The Na,K-ATPase is an integral membrane heterodimer belonging to the P-type ATPase family. This ion channel uses the energy derived from ATP hydrolysis to maintain membrane potential by driving sodium export and potassium import across the plasma membrane against their electrochemical gradients. It is composed of a catalytic α subunit and a β subunit (reviewed in 1). Several phosphorylation sites have been identified for the α1 subunit. Tyr10 is phosphorylated by an as yet undetermined kinase (2), Ser16 and Ser23 are phosphorylated by PKC, and Ser943 is phosphorylated by PKA (3-5). All of these sites have been implicated in the regulation of enzyme activity in response to hormones and neurotransmitters, altering trafficking and kinetic properties of Na,K-ATPase. Altered phosphorylation in response to angiotensin II stimulates activity in the rat proximal tubule (6). Na,K-ATPase is also involved in other signal transduction pathways. Insulin regulates its localization in differentiated primary human skeletal muscle cells, and this regulation is dependent on ERK1/2 phosphorylation of the α subunit (7). Na,K-ATPase and Src form a signaling receptor complex that affects regulation of Src kinase activity and, subsequently, its downstream effectors (8,9).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The Na,K-ATPase is an integral membrane heterodimer belonging to the P-type ATPase family. This ion channel uses the energy derived from ATP hydrolysis to maintain membrane potential by driving sodium export and potassium import across the plasma membrane against their electrochemical gradients. It is composed of a catalytic α subunit and a β subunit (reviewed in 1). Several phosphorylation sites have been identified for the α1 subunit. Tyr10 is phosphorylated by an as yet undetermined kinase (2), Ser16 and Ser23 are phosphorylated by PKC, and Ser943 is phosphorylated by PKA (3-5). All of these sites have been implicated in the regulation of enzyme activity in response to hormones and neurotransmitters, altering trafficking and kinetic properties of Na,K-ATPase. Altered phosphorylation in response to angiotensin II stimulates activity in the rat proximal tubule (6). Na,K-ATPase is also involved in other signal transduction pathways. Insulin regulates its localization in differentiated primary human skeletal muscle cells, and this regulation is dependent on ERK1/2 phosphorylation of the α subunit (7). Na,K-ATPase and Src form a signaling receptor complex that affects regulation of Src kinase activity and, subsequently, its downstream effectors (8,9).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The Na,K-ATPase is an integral membrane heterodimer belonging to the P-type ATPase family. This ion channel uses the energy derived from ATP hydrolysis to maintain membrane potential by driving sodium export and potassium import across the plasma membrane against their electrochemical gradients. It is composed of a catalytic α subunit and a β subunit (reviewed in 1). Several phosphorylation sites have been identified for the α1 subunit. Tyr10 is phosphorylated by an as yet undetermined kinase (2), Ser16 and Ser23 are phosphorylated by PKC, and Ser943 is phosphorylated by PKA (3-5). All of these sites have been implicated in the regulation of enzyme activity in response to hormones and neurotransmitters, altering trafficking and kinetic properties of Na,K-ATPase. Altered phosphorylation in response to angiotensin II stimulates activity in the rat proximal tubule (6). Na,K-ATPase is also involved in other signal transduction pathways. Insulin regulates its localization in differentiated primary human skeletal muscle cells, and this regulation is dependent on ERK1/2 phosphorylation of the α subunit (7). Na,K-ATPase and Src form a signaling receptor complex that affects regulation of Src kinase activity and, subsequently, its downstream effectors (8,9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: NCX1 (Na+/Ca2+ exchanger, isoform 1) belongs to a conserved family of sodium-calcium membrane antiporter proteins that play a fundamental role in regulating intracellular calcium levels (1). NCX1 facilitates transmembrane transport of Ca2+ ions in exchange for Na+ ions in response to electrochemical gradients (2). Due to its relatively low affinity for calcium, NCX1 most commonly functions to export Ca2+ under acute conditions of high intracellular Ca2+. Notably however, NCX1 is a reversible antiporter, and can thus facilate Ca2+ influx under specialized physiological circumstances (3). Research studies have shown that NCX1 is particularly important for regulating intracellular Ca2+ levels in excitatory cell types (e.g., neurons, cardiac muscle). For example, conditional knockout of NCX1 in mouse cardiac pacemaker cells identified a critical role for NCX1 in the initiation and maintenance of cardiac rhythm (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: G-protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2), also known as beta-adrenergic receptor kinase 1 (beta-ARK1), is a member of the GRK family, which phosphorylates the activated form of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and initiates the desensitization process of GPCR (1). GRK2 kinase activity and cellular localization are tightly regulated by interactions with activated receptors, G-beta and G-gamma subunits, adaptor proteins, phospholipids, caveolin and calmodulin, as well as by phosphorylation (1). PKC phosphorylation enhances GRK2 activity by promoting its membrane localization and by abolishing the inhibitory association of calmodulin (2,3). PKA phosphorylates GRK2 at Ser685, which facilitates the association of GRK2 with a beta-adrenergic receptor (4). Erk inhibits GRK2 activity via phosphorylation at Ser670 (5). Src phosphorylates GRK2 at multiple tyrosine residues (Tyr13, 86 and 92), which activates GRK2 activity and promotes GRK2 degradation (6,7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The ATP2A2 (SERCA2) calcium pump is one of several sarcoplasmic and endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPases responsible for regulating calcium transport across intracellular membranes (1). Multiple isoforms have been isolated, with ATP2A2a (SERCA2a) found predominantly in the sarcoplasmic reticulum of muscle cells and ATP2A2b (SERCA2b) more ubiquitously expressed in the endoplasmic reticulum of most cell types (2). An isoform containing a truncated carboxy region (ATP2A2c) is expressed in epithelial and hematopoietic cell lines and may be involved in monocyte differentiation (3). Post-translational modification of ATP2A2 (SERCA2), including phosphorylation and tyrosine nitration, modify Ca2+ -ATPase activity and calcium transport (4,5). Mutation in the corresponding ATP2A2 (SERCA2) gene results in Darier disease, a skin disorder characterized by the presence of dark, keratotic papules or rash found on the head and torso (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The ATP2A2 (SERCA2) calcium pump is one of several sarcoplasmic and endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPases responsible for regulating calcium transport across intracellular membranes (1). Multiple isoforms have been isolated, with ATP2A2a (SERCA2a) found predominantly in the sarcoplasmic reticulum of muscle cells and ATP2A2b (SERCA2b) more ubiquitously expressed in the endoplasmic reticulum of most cell types (2). An isoform containing a truncated carboxy region (ATP2A2c) is expressed in epithelial and hematopoietic cell lines and may be involved in monocyte differentiation (3). Post-translational modification of ATP2A2 (SERCA2), including phosphorylation and tyrosine nitration, modify Ca2+ -ATPase activity and calcium transport (4,5). Mutation in the corresponding ATP2A2 (SERCA2) gene results in Darier disease, a skin disorder characterized by the presence of dark, keratotic papules or rash found on the head and torso (6).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Phospholamban (PLN) was identified as a major phosphoprotein component of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) (1). Its name, "lamban", is derived from the greek word "lambano" meaning "to receive", so named due to the fact that phospholamban is heavily phosphorylated on serine and threonine residues in response to cardiac stimulation (1). Although originally thought to be a single 20-25 kDa protein due to its electrophoretic mobility on SDS-PAGE, PLN is actually a 52 amino acid, 6 kDa, membrane-spanning protein capable of forming stable homooligomers, even in the presence of SDS (2). Despite very high expression in cardiac tissue, phospholamban is also expressed in skeletal and smooth muscle (3). Localization of PLN is limited to the SR, where it serves as a regulator of the sarco-endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase, SERCA (4). PLN binds directly to SERCA and effectively lowers its affinity for calcium, thus reducing calcium transport into the SR. Phosphorylation of PLN at Ser16 by Protein Kinase A or myotonic dystrophy protein kinase and/or phosphorylation at Thr17 by Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase results in release of PLN from SERCA, relief of this inhibition, and increased calcium uptake by the SR (reviewed in 5,6). It has long been held that phosphorylation at Ser16 and Thr17 occurs sequentially, but increasing evidence suggests that phosphorylation, especially at Thr17, may be differentially regulated (reviewed in 7,8).Rodent models of heart failure have shown that the expression level and degree of phosphorylation of PLN are critical in modulating calcium flux and contractility (reviewed in 9-11). Deletion or decreased expression of PLN promotes increased calcium flux and increased cardiac contractility, whereas overexpression of PLN results in sequestration of SERCA, decreased calcium flux, reduced contractility, and rescue of cardiac dysfunction and failure in mouse models of hypertension and cardiomyopathy (reviewed in 10). Distinct mutations in PLN have been detected in humans, resulting either in decreased or no expression of PLN protein (12,13) or binding defects between PLN, SERCA and/or regulatory proteins (14,15), both of which result in cardiac myopathy and heart failure. Interestingly, while the human phenotype of most PLN defects mimic those seen in rodent and vice versa, there are some instances where the type and severity of cardiac disease resulting from PLN mutations in rodent and human differ, making a consensus mechanism elusive.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Phospholamban (PLN) was identified as a major phosphoprotein component of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) (1). Its name, "lamban", is derived from the greek word "lambano" meaning "to receive", so named due to the fact that phospholamban is heavily phosphorylated on serine and threonine residues in response to cardiac stimulation (1). Although originally thought to be a single 20-25 kDa protein due to its electrophoretic mobility on SDS-PAGE, PLN is actually a 52 amino acid, 6 kDa, membrane-spanning protein capable of forming stable homooligomers, even in the presence of SDS (2). Despite very high expression in cardiac tissue, phospholamban is also expressed in skeletal and smooth muscle (3). Localization of PLN is limited to the SR, where it serves as a regulator of the sarco-endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase, SERCA (4). PLN binds directly to SERCA and effectively lowers its affinity for calcium, thus reducing calcium transport into the SR. Phosphorylation of PLN at Ser16 by Protein Kinase A or myotonic dystrophy protein kinase and/or phosphorylation at Thr17 by Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase results in release of PLN from SERCA, relief of this inhibition, and increased calcium uptake by the SR (reviewed in 5,6). It has long been held that phosphorylation at Ser16 and Thr17 occurs sequentially, but increasing evidence suggests that phosphorylation, especially at Thr17, may be differentially regulated (reviewed in 7,8).Rodent models of heart failure have shown that the expression level and degree of phosphorylation of PLN are critical in modulating calcium flux and contractility (reviewed in 9-11). Deletion or decreased expression of PLN promotes increased calcium flux and increased cardiac contractility, whereas overexpression of PLN results in sequestration of SERCA, decreased calcium flux, reduced contractility, and rescue of cardiac dysfunction and failure in mouse models of hypertension and cardiomyopathy (reviewed in 10). Distinct mutations in PLN have been detected in humans, resulting either in decreased or no expression of PLN protein (12,13) or binding defects between PLN, SERCA and/or regulatory proteins (14,15), both of which result in cardiac myopathy and heart failure. Interestingly, while the human phenotype of most PLN defects mimic those seen in rodent and vice versa, there are some instances where the type and severity of cardiac disease resulting from PLN mutations in rodent and human differ, making a consensus mechanism elusive.

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: CaMKII is an important member of the calcium/calmodulin-activated protein kinase family, functioning in neural synaptic stimulation and T cell receptor signaling (1,2). CaMKII has catalytic and regulatory domains. Ca2+/calmodulin binding to the CaMKII regulatory domain relieves autoinhibition and activates the kinase (3). The activated CaMKII further autophosphorylates at Thr286 to render the kinase constitutively active (3). The threonine phosphorylation state of CaMKII can be regulated through PP1/PKA. PP1 (protein phosphatase 1) dephosphorylates phospho-CaMKII at Thr286. PKA (protein kinase A) prevents phospho-CaMKII (Thr286) dephosphorylation through an inhibitory effect on PP1 (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: CaMKII is an important member of the calcium/calmodulin-activated protein kinase family, functioning in neural synaptic stimulation and T cell receptor signaling (1,2). CaMKII has catalytic and regulatory domains. Ca2+/calmodulin binding to the CaMKII regulatory domain relieves autoinhibition and activates the kinase (3). The activated CaMKII further autophosphorylates at Thr286 to render the kinase constitutively active (3). The threonine phosphorylation state of CaMKII can be regulated through PP1/PKA. PP1 (protein phosphatase 1) dephosphorylates phospho-CaMKII at Thr286. PKA (protein kinase A) prevents phospho-CaMKII (Thr286) dephosphorylation through an inhibitory effect on PP1 (4).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: CaMKII is an important member of the calcium/calmodulin-activated protein kinase family, functioning in neural synaptic stimulation and T cell receptor signaling (1,2). CaMKII has catalytic and regulatory domains. Ca2+/calmodulin binding to the CaMKII regulatory domain relieves autoinhibition and activates the kinase (3). The activated CaMKII further autophosphorylates at Thr286 to render the kinase constitutively active (3). The threonine phosphorylation state of CaMKII can be regulated through PP1/PKA. PP1 (protein phosphatase 1) dephosphorylates phospho-CaMKII at Thr286. PKA (protein kinase A) prevents phospho-CaMKII (Thr286) dephosphorylation through an inhibitory effect on PP1 (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: CaMKII is an important member of the calcium/calmodulin-activated protein kinase family, functioning in neural synaptic stimulation and T cell receptor signaling (1,2). CaMKII has catalytic and regulatory domains. Ca2+/calmodulin binding to the CaMKII regulatory domain relieves autoinhibition and activates the kinase (3). The activated CaMKII further autophosphorylates at Thr286 to render the kinase constitutively active (3). The threonine phosphorylation state of CaMKII can be regulated through PP1/PKA. PP1 (protein phosphatase 1) dephosphorylates phospho-CaMKII at Thr286. PKA (protein kinase A) prevents phospho-CaMKII (Thr286) dephosphorylation through an inhibitory effect on PP1 (4).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) is one of the earliest events in a cascade that controls a variety of cellular responses, including secretion, gene expression, proliferation, and muscle contraction (1,2). PKC isoforms belong to three groups based on calcium dependency and activators. Classical PKCs are calcium-dependent via their C2 domains and are activated by phosphatidylserine (PS), diacylglycerol (DAG), and phorbol esters (TPA, PMA) through their cysteine-rich C1 domains. Both novel and atypical PKCs are calcium-independent, but only novel PKCs are activated by PS, DAG, and phorbol esters (3-5). Members of these three PKC groups contain a pseudo-substrate or autoinhibitory domain that binds to substrate-binding sites in the catalytic domain to prevent activation in the absence of cofactors or activators. Control of PKC activity is regulated through three distinct phosphorylation events. Phosphorylation occurs in vivo at Thr500 in the activation loop, at Thr641 through autophosphorylation, and at the carboxy-terminal hydrophobic site Ser660 (2). Atypical PKC isoforms lack hydrophobic region phosphorylation, which correlates with the presence of glutamic acid rather than the serine or threonine residues found in more typical PKC isoforms. The enzyme PDK1 or a close relative is responsible for PKC activation. A recent addition to the PKC superfamily is PKCμ (PKD), which is regulated by DAG and TPA through its C1 domain. PKD is distinguished by the presence of a PH domain and by its unique substrate recognition and Golgi localization (6). PKC-related kinases (PRK) lack the C1 domain and do not respond to DAG or phorbol esters. Phosphatidylinositol lipids activate PRKs, and small Rho-family GTPases bind to the homology region 1 (HR1) to regulate PRK kinase activity (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: β1-Adrenergic Receptor (β1AR) is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) involved in the regulation of cardiovascular functions (1). Together with β2AR, β1AR is a major βAR in the heart. β1AR is activated by catecholamines and couples to Gαs protein, activating adenylate cyclase and increasing intracellular cAMP levels (2). Beta-blockers (βAR antagonists), one of the major class of therapeutics in cardiovascular medicine, act mostly by preventing catecholamine binding to β1AR (3).

$489
96 assays
1 Kit
The PathScan® Total Caveolin-1 Sandwich ELISA Kit is a solid phase sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) that detects endogenous levels of total Caveolin-1 protein. A Caveolin-1 Rabbit mAb has been coated onto the microwells. After incubation with cell lysates, Caveolin-1 protein is captured by the coated antibody. Following extensive washing, Caveolin-1 Mouse Detection mAb is added to detect the captured Caveolin-1 protein. Anti-mouse IgG, HRP-linked Antibody is then used to recognize the bound detection antibody. HRP substrate, TMB, is added to develop color. The magnitude of absorbance for the developed color is proportional to the quantity of total Caveolin-1 protein.Antibodies in kit are custom formulations specific to kit.
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Background: The 21-24 kDa integral proteins, caveolins, are the principal structural components of the cholesterol/sphingolipid-enriched plasma membrane microdomain caveolae. Three members of the caveolin family (caveolin-1, -2, and -3) have been identified with different tissue distributions. Caveolins form hetero- and homo-oligomers that interact with cholesterol and other lipids (1). Caveolins are involved in diverse biological functions, including vesicular trafficking, cholesterol homeostasis, cell adhesion, and apoptosis, and are also implicated in neurodegenerative disease (2). Caveolins interact with multiple signaling molecules such as Gα subunit, tyrosine kinase receptors, PKCs, Src family tyrosine kinases, and eNOS (1,2). It is believed that caveolins serve as scaffolding proteins for the integration of signal transduction. Phosphorylation at Tyr14 is essential for caveolin association with SH2 or PTB domain-containing adaptor proteins such as GRB7 (3-5). Phosphorylation at Ser80 regulates caveolin binding to the ER membrane and entry into the secretory pathway (6).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated PKCα (D7E6E) Rabbit mAb #59754.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) is one of the earliest events in a cascade that controls a variety of cellular responses, including secretion, gene expression, proliferation, and muscle contraction (1,2). PKC isoforms belong to three groups based on calcium dependency and activators. Classical PKCs are calcium-dependent via their C2 domains and are activated by phosphatidylserine (PS), diacylglycerol (DAG), and phorbol esters (TPA, PMA) through their cysteine-rich C1 domains. Both novel and atypical PKCs are calcium-independent, but only novel PKCs are activated by PS, DAG, and phorbol esters (3-5). Members of these three PKC groups contain a pseudo-substrate or autoinhibitory domain that binds to substrate-binding sites in the catalytic domain to prevent activation in the absence of cofactors or activators. Control of PKC activity is regulated through three distinct phosphorylation events. Phosphorylation occurs in vivo at Thr500 in the activation loop, at Thr641 through autophosphorylation, and at the carboxy-terminal hydrophobic site Ser660 (2). Atypical PKC isoforms lack hydrophobic region phosphorylation, which correlates with the presence of glutamic acid rather than the serine or threonine residues found in more typical PKC isoforms. The enzyme PDK1 or a close relative is responsible for PKC activation. A recent addition to the PKC superfamily is PKCμ (PKD), which is regulated by DAG and TPA through its C1 domain. PKD is distinguished by the presence of a PH domain and by its unique substrate recognition and Golgi localization (6). PKC-related kinases (PRK) lack the C1 domain and do not respond to DAG or phorbol esters. Phosphatidylinositol lipids activate PRKs, and small Rho-family GTPases bind to the homology region 1 (HR1) to regulate PRK kinase activity (7).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) is one of the earliest events in a cascade that controls a variety of cellular responses, including secretion, gene expression, proliferation, and muscle contraction (1,2). PKC isoforms belong to three groups based on calcium dependency and activators. Classical PKCs are calcium-dependent via their C2 domains and are activated by phosphatidylserine (PS), diacylglycerol (DAG), and phorbol esters (TPA, PMA) through their cysteine-rich C1 domains. Both novel and atypical PKCs are calcium-independent, but only novel PKCs are activated by PS, DAG, and phorbol esters (3-5). Members of these three PKC groups contain a pseudo-substrate or autoinhibitory domain that binds to substrate-binding sites in the catalytic domain to prevent activation in the absence of cofactors or activators. Control of PKC activity is regulated through three distinct phosphorylation events. Phosphorylation occurs in vivo at Thr500 in the activation loop, at Thr641 through autophosphorylation, and at the carboxy-terminal hydrophobic site Ser660 (2). Atypical PKC isoforms lack hydrophobic region phosphorylation, which correlates with the presence of glutamic acid rather than the serine or threonine residues found in more typical PKC isoforms. The enzyme PDK1 or a close relative is responsible for PKC activation. A recent addition to the PKC superfamily is PKCμ (PKD), which is regulated by DAG and TPA through its C1 domain. PKD is distinguished by the presence of a PH domain and by its unique substrate recognition and Golgi localization (6). PKC-related kinases (PRK) lack the C1 domain and do not respond to DAG or phorbol esters. Phosphatidylinositol lipids activate PRKs, and small Rho-family GTPases bind to the homology region 1 (HR1) to regulate PRK kinase activity (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) is one of the earliest events in a cascade that controls a variety of cellular responses, including secretion, gene expression, proliferation, and muscle contraction (1,2). PKC isoforms belong to three groups based on calcium dependency and activators. Classical PKCs are calcium-dependent via their C2 domains and are activated by phosphatidylserine (PS), diacylglycerol (DAG), and phorbol esters (TPA, PMA) through their cysteine-rich C1 domains. Both novel and atypical PKCs are calcium-independent, but only novel PKCs are activated by PS, DAG, and phorbol esters (3-5). Members of these three PKC groups contain a pseudo-substrate or autoinhibitory domain that binds to substrate-binding sites in the catalytic domain to prevent activation in the absence of cofactors or activators. Control of PKC activity is regulated through three distinct phosphorylation events. Phosphorylation occurs in vivo at Thr500 in the activation loop, at Thr641 through autophosphorylation, and at the carboxy-terminal hydrophobic site Ser660 (2). Atypical PKC isoforms lack hydrophobic region phosphorylation, which correlates with the presence of glutamic acid rather than the serine or threonine residues found in more typical PKC isoforms. The enzyme PDK1 or a close relative is responsible for PKC activation. A recent addition to the PKC superfamily is PKCμ (PKD), which is regulated by DAG and TPA through its C1 domain. PKD is distinguished by the presence of a PH domain and by its unique substrate recognition and Golgi localization (6). PKC-related kinases (PRK) lack the C1 domain and do not respond to DAG or phorbol esters. Phosphatidylinositol lipids activate PRKs, and small Rho-family GTPases bind to the homology region 1 (HR1) to regulate PRK kinase activity (7).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) is one of the earliest events in a cascade that controls a variety of cellular responses, including secretion, gene expression, proliferation, and muscle contraction (1,2). PKC isoforms belong to three groups based on calcium dependency and activators. Classical PKCs are calcium-dependent via their C2 domains and are activated by phosphatidylserine (PS), diacylglycerol (DAG), and phorbol esters (TPA, PMA) through their cysteine-rich C1 domains. Both novel and atypical PKCs are calcium-independent, but only novel PKCs are activated by PS, DAG, and phorbol esters (3-5). Members of these three PKC groups contain a pseudo-substrate or autoinhibitory domain that binds to substrate-binding sites in the catalytic domain to prevent activation in the absence of cofactors or activators. Control of PKC activity is regulated through three distinct phosphorylation events. Phosphorylation occurs in vivo at Thr500 in the activation loop, at Thr641 through autophosphorylation, and at the carboxy-terminal hydrophobic site Ser660 (2). Atypical PKC isoforms lack hydrophobic region phosphorylation, which correlates with the presence of glutamic acid rather than the serine or threonine residues found in more typical PKC isoforms. The enzyme PDK1 or a close relative is responsible for PKC activation. A recent addition to the PKC superfamily is PKCμ (PKD), which is regulated by DAG and TPA through its C1 domain. PKD is distinguished by the presence of a PH domain and by its unique substrate recognition and Golgi localization (6). PKC-related kinases (PRK) lack the C1 domain and do not respond to DAG or phorbol esters. Phosphatidylinositol lipids activate PRKs, and small Rho-family GTPases bind to the homology region 1 (HR1) to regulate PRK kinase activity (7).