20% off purchase of 3 or more products* | Learn More >>

Rat Tubulin beta-3

Also showing Mouse Tubulin beta-3, Human Tubulin beta-3

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: microtubules, microfilaments (actin filaments), and intermediate filaments. Globular tubulin subunits comprise the microtubule building block, with α/β-tubulin heterodimers forming the tubulin subunit common to all eukaryotic cells. γ-tubulin is required to nucleate polymerization of tubulin subunits to form microtubule polymers. Many cell movements are mediated by microtubule action, including the beating of cilia and flagella, cytoplasmic transport of membrane vesicles, chromosome alignment during meiosis/mitosis, and nerve-cell axon migration. These movements result from competitive microtubule polymerization and depolymerization or through the actions of microtubule motor proteins (1).β3-tubulin (TUBB3) is one of six β-tubulin isoforms and is expressed highly during fetal and postnatal development (axon guidance and maturation) (2). Its expression levels decrease in the adult central nervous system (CNS) but remain high in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) (3). Microtubules enriched in β3-tubulin are more dynamic than those composed of other β-tubulin isoforms (4). Research studies have shown that mutations in the β3-tubulin gene TUBB3 cause ocular motility defects and other nervous system disorders. Furthermore, β3-tubulin is present in neoplastic but not in normal differentiated glial cells. Thus, β3-tubulin is a great neuronal marker (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: microtubules, microfilaments (actin filaments), and intermediate filaments. Globular tubulin subunits comprise the microtubule building block, with α/β-tubulin heterodimers forming the tubulin subunit common to all eukaryotic cells. γ-tubulin is required to nucleate polymerization of tubulin subunits to form microtubule polymers. Many cell movements are mediated by microtubule action, including the beating of cilia and flagella, cytoplasmic transport of membrane vesicles, chromosome alignment during meiosis/mitosis, and nerve-cell axon migration. These movements result from competitive microtubule polymerization and depolymerization or through the actions of microtubule motor proteins (1).β3-tubulin (TUBB3) is one of six β-tubulin isoforms and is expressed highly during fetal and postnatal development (axon guidance and maturation) (2). Its expression levels decrease in the adult central nervous system (CNS) but remain high in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) (3). Microtubules enriched in β3-tubulin are more dynamic than those composed of other β-tubulin isoforms (4). Research studies have shown that mutations in the β3-tubulin gene TUBB3 cause ocular motility defects and other nervous system disorders. Furthermore, β3-tubulin is present in neoplastic but not in normal differentiated glial cells. Thus, β3-tubulin is a great neuronal marker (5).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: microtubules, microfilaments (actin filaments), and intermediate filaments. Globular tubulin subunits comprise the microtubule building block, with α/β-tubulin heterodimers forming the tubulin subunit common to all eukaryotic cells. γ-tubulin is required to nucleate polymerization of tubulin subunits to form microtubule polymers. Many cell movements are mediated by microtubule action, including the beating of cilia and flagella, cytoplasmic transport of membrane vesicles, chromosome alignment during meiosis/mitosis, and nerve-cell axon migration. These movements result from competitive microtubule polymerization and depolymerization or through the actions of microtubule motor proteins (1).β3-tubulin (TUBB3) is one of six β-tubulin isoforms and is expressed highly during fetal and postnatal development (axon guidance and maturation) (2). Its expression levels decrease in the adult central nervous system (CNS) but remain high in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) (3). Microtubules enriched in β3-tubulin are more dynamic than those composed of other β-tubulin isoforms (4). Research studies have shown that mutations in the β3-tubulin gene TUBB3 cause ocular motility defects and other nervous system disorders. Furthermore, β3-tubulin is present in neoplastic but not in normal differentiated glial cells. Thus, β3-tubulin is a great neuronal marker (5).