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siRNA Gtp Binding

Also showing siRNA Transfection Gtp Binding

$262
100 transfections
300 µl
SignalSilence® Rheb siRNA II from Cell Signaling Technology (CST) allows the researcher to specifically inhibit Rheb expression using RNA interference, a method whereby gene expression can be selectively silenced through the delivery of double stranded RNA molecules into the cell. All SignalSilence® siRNA products from CST are rigorously tested in-house and have been shown to reduce target protein expression by western analysis.
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: Ras Homolog Enriched in Brain (Rheb) is an evolutionarily conserved member of the Ras family of small GTP-binding proteins originally found to be rapidly induced by synaptic activity in the hippocampus following seizure (1). While it is expressed at relatively high levels in the brain, Rheb is widely expressed in other tissues and may be induced by growth factor stimulation. Like other Ras family members, Rheb triggers activation of the Raf-MEK-MAPK pathway (2). Biochemical and genetic studies demonstrate that Rheb has an important role in regulating the insulin/TOR signaling pathway (3-6). The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a serine/threonine protein kinase that acts as a sensor for ATP and amino acids, balancing the availability of nutrients with translation and cell growth. The tuberin/hamartin (TSC2/TSC1) complex inhibits mTOR activity indirectly by inhibiting Rheb through the tuberin GAP activity (7).

$262
100 transfections
300 µl
SignalSilence® Rheb siRNA I from Cell Signaling Technology (CST) allows the researcher to specifically inhibit Rheb expression using RNA interference, a method whereby gene expression can be selectively silenced through the delivery of double stranded RNA molecules into the cell. All SignalSilence® siRNA products from CST are rigorously tested in-house and have been shown to reduce target protein expression by western analysis.
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: Ras Homolog Enriched in Brain (Rheb) is an evolutionarily conserved member of the Ras family of small GTP-binding proteins originally found to be rapidly induced by synaptic activity in the hippocampus following seizure (1). While it is expressed at relatively high levels in the brain, Rheb is widely expressed in other tissues and may be induced by growth factor stimulation. Like other Ras family members, Rheb triggers activation of the Raf-MEK-MAPK pathway (2). Biochemical and genetic studies demonstrate that Rheb has an important role in regulating the insulin/TOR signaling pathway (3-6). The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a serine/threonine protein kinase that acts as a sensor for ATP and amino acids, balancing the availability of nutrients with translation and cell growth. The tuberin/hamartin (TSC2/TSC1) complex inhibits mTOR activity indirectly by inhibiting Rheb through the tuberin GAP activity (7).

$262
3 nmol
300 µl
SignalSilence® Mitofusin-1 siRNA II from Cell Signaling Technology (CST) allows the researcher to specifically inhibit mitofusin-1 expression using RNA interference, a method whereby gene expression can be selectively silenced through the delivery of double stranded RNA molecules into the cell. All SignalSilence® siRNA products from CST are rigorously tested in-house and have been shown to reduce target protein expression by western analysis.
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: Mitofusins are mitochondrial transmembrane GTPases that function to regulate mitochondrial fusion, a process that occurs in concert with mitochondrial division and is necessary for the maintenance of structural and genetic mitochondrial integrity (1,2). Two mitofusins have been described in mammals, mitofusin-1 and -2, which share 60% amino acid identity and appear to function coordinately to regulate mitochondrial fusion (3). Mitochondrial fusion is widely recognized as important for normal cell growth and development (4), and may have evolved as a mechanism to offset the deleterious effects of mtDNA mutations (3). Null mutations in either mitofusin are embryonic lethal in mice, whereas conditional knockout studies have shown that combined deletion of mitofusin-1 and mitofusin-2 in skeletal muscle results in severe mitochondrial dysfunction (3).