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siRNA Regulation of Transcription

$262
3 nmol
300 µl
SignalSilence® USP9X siRNA I from Cell Signaling Technology (CST) allows the researcher to specifically inhibit USP9X expression using RNA interference, a method whereby gene expression can be selectively silenced through the delivery of double stranded RNA molecules into the cell. All SignalSilence® siRNA products from CST are rigorously tested in-house and have been shown to reduce target protein expression by western analysis.
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: Protein ubiquitination and deubiquitination are reversible processes catalyzed by ubiquitinating enzymes (UBEs) and deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) respectively (1,2). DUBs are categorized into five subfamilies-USP, UCH, OTU, MJD, and JAMM. Ubiquitin-specific protease 9, X-linked (USP9X) possesses a well-conserved catalytic domain with cysteine peptidase activity, which allows for cleavage of ubiquitin and polyubiquitin conjugates. USP9X is the mammalian homolog of the Drosophila fat-facets (faf) gene, which is essential for normal eye development and viability of the early fly embryo (3,4). While USP9X expression is also critical for normal mammalian development (5-7), many of its substrates are only beginning to be elucidated. There is mounting evidence that USP9X functions in the formation of epithelial cell-cell contacts through deubiquitination-dependent stabilization of molecules involved in maintaining the integrity of both adherens and tight junctions. Indeed, USP9X has been found to associate with AF-6, the β-catenin-E-cadherin complex, and EFA6 (8-11). Research studies have also demonstrated that USP9X is an integral component of the TGF-β/BMP signaling cascade by opposing TRIM33-mediated monoubiquitination of SMAD4 (12). USP9X is overexpressed in a variety of human cancers and contributes to enhanced cell survival, in part, through its ability to deubiquitinate and stabilize the Mcl-1 oncoprotein (13). There is some evidence, however, that suggests the role of USP9X in tumorigenesis is context dependent. Research studies have implicated USP9X in a tumor suppressor role during the early stages of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and in an oncogenic role during advanced stages of PDAC (14,15).

$262
3 nmol
300 µl
SignalSilence® VPRBP siRNA I from Cell Signaling Technology (CST) allows the researcher to specifically inhibit VPRBP expression using RNA interference, a method whereby gene expression can be selectively silenced through the delivery of double stranded RNA molecules into the cell. All SignalSilence® siRNA products from CST are rigorously tested in-house and have been shown to reduce target protein expression by western analysis.
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: The HIV-1 viral protein R (Vpr)-binding protein (VPRBP, DCAF1) is a substrate-specific adaptor for the CUL4-based ubiquitin ligase complex that consists of CUL4A, RBX1, and DDB1 (1). VPRBP protein structure contains a central LIS1 homology (LisH) motif responsible for dimerization, and two carboxy-terminal WD-40 motifs involved in Vpr and DDB1 binding (2-4). Research studies demonstrate that VPRBP plays a role in hepatic lipid metabolism by promoting the ubiquitin-dependent proteasomal degradation of the TR4 nuclear receptor, which is involved in lipid homeostasis (5). The VPRBP protein plays a role in mammalian germ cell development through regulation of TET methylcytosine dioxygenase activation (6). Additional studies show that VPRBP exhibits kinase activity and phosphorylates histone H2A at Ser120, which blocks tumor suppressor gene transcription (7). The tumor suppressor Merlin/NF2 inhibits tumorigenesis through interaction with and suppression of the CUL4A-RBX1-DDB1-VPRBP complex (8).

$262
3 nmol
300 µl
SignalSilence® MUC1 siRNA I from Cell Signaling Technology (CST) allows the researcher to specifically inhibit MUC1 expression using RNA interference, a method whereby gene expression can be selectively silenced through the delivery of double stranded RNA molecules into the cell. All SignalSilence® siRNA products from CST are rigorously tested in-house and have been shown to reduce target protein expression by western analysis.
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: Mucins represent a family of glycoproteins characterized by repeat domains and dense O-glycosylation (1). MUC1 (or mucin 1) is aberrantly overexpressed in most human carcinomas. Increased expression of MUC1 in carcinomas reduces cell-cell and cell-ECM interactions. MUC1 is cleaved proteolytically, and the large ectodomain can remain associated with the small 25 kDa carboxy-terminal domain that contains a transmembrane segment and a 72-residue cytoplasmic tail (1). MUC1 interacts with ErbB family receptors and potentiates ERK1/2 activation (2). MUC1 also interacts with β-catenin, which is regulated by GSK-3β, PKCγ, and Src through phosphorylation at Ser44, Thr41, and Tyr46 of the MUC1 cytoplasmic tail (3-5). Overexpression of MUC1 potentiates transformation (6) and attenuates stress-induced apoptosis through the Akt or p53 pathways (7,8).

$262
3 nmol
300 µl
SignalSilence® YB1 siRNA from Cell Signaling Technology (CST) allows the researcher to specifically inhibit YB1 expression using RNA interference, a method whereby gene expression can be selectively silenced through the delivery of double stranded RNA molecules into the cell. All SignalSilence® siRNA products are rigorously tested in-house and have been shown to reduce target protein expression in specified cell lines.
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: The Y-box binding protein 1 (YB1) belongs to a family of evolutionarily conserved, multifunctional Y-box proteins that bind single-stranded DNA and RNA and function as regulators of transcription, RNA metabolism, and protein synthesis (1). YB1 binds to Y-box sequences (TAACC) found in multiple gene promoters and can positively or negatively regulate transcription. YB1 activates genes associated with proliferation and cancer, such as cyclin A, cyclin B1, matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), and the multi-drug resistance 1 (MDR1) gene (2-4). YB1 represses genes associated with cell death, including the Fas cell death-associated receptor and the p53 tumor suppressor gene (5-7). It also interacts with the RNA-splicing factor SRp30c and stabilizes interleukin-2 (IL-2) mRNA upon induction of T lymphocytes by IL-2 (8,9). The majority of YB1 protein localizes to the cytoplasm, with a minor pool found in the nucleus; however, nuclear localization appears to be critical for its role in promoting proliferation. Nuclear translocation is cell cycle regulated, with YB1 protein accumulating in the nucleus during G1/S phase (2). In addition, nuclear translocation is induced in response to extracellular stimuli such as hyperthermia and UV irradiation, or treatment of cells with thrombin, interferons, or insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I) (2,10). Treatment of the MCF7 breast cancer cell line with IGF-I results in Akt-mediated phosphorylation of YB1 at Ser102, which is required for nuclear translocation of YB1 and its ability to promote anchorage-independent growth (10). Research studies have shown that YB1 is overexpressed in many malignant tissues, including breast cancer, non-small cell lung carcinoma, ovarian adenocarcinomas, human osteosarcomas, colorectal carcinomas, and malignant melanomas. Investigators have shown that nuclear YB1 expression correlates with high levels of proliferation, drug resistance, and poor tumor prognosis (2,7,10).

$262
3 nmol
300 µl
SignalSilence® Met siRNA I from Cell Signaling Technology (CST) allows the researcher to specifically inhibit Met expression using RNA interference, a method whereby gene expression can be selectively silenced through the delivery of double stranded RNA molecules into the cell. All SignalSilence® siRNA products from CST are rigorously tested in-house and have been shown to reduce target protein expression by western analysis.
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: Met, a high affinity tyrosine kinase receptor for hepatocyte growth factor (HGF, also known as scatter factor) is a disulfide-linked heterodimer made of 45 kDa α- and 145 kDa β-subunits (1,2). The α-subunit and the amino-terminal region of the β-subunit form the extracellular domain. The remainder of the β-chain spans the plasma membrane and contains a cytoplasmic region with tyrosine kinase activity. Interaction of Met with HGF results in autophosphorylation at multiple tyrosines, which recruit several downstream signaling components, including Gab1, c-Cbl, and PI3 kinase (3). These fundamental events are important for all of the biological functions involving Met kinase activity. The addition of a phosphate at cytoplasmic Tyr1003 is essential for Met protein ubiquitination and degradation (4). Phosphorylation at Tyr1234/1235 in the Met kinase domain is critical for kinase activation. Phosphorylation at Tyr1349 in the Met cytoplasmic domain provides a direct binding site for Gab1 (5). Research studies have shown that altered Met levels and/or tyrosine kinase activities are found in several types of tumors, including renal, colon, and breast. Thus, investigators have concluded that Met is an attractive potential cancer therapeutic and diagnostic target (6,7).

$262
3 nmol
300 µl
SignalSilence® Met siRNA II from Cell Signaling Technology (CST) allows the researcher to specifically inhibit Met expression using RNA interference, a method whereby gene expression can be selectively silenced through the delivery of double stranded RNA molecules into the cell. All SignalSilence® siRNA products from CST are rigorously tested in-house and have been shown to reduce target protein expression by western analysis.
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: Met, a high affinity tyrosine kinase receptor for hepatocyte growth factor (HGF, also known as scatter factor) is a disulfide-linked heterodimer made of 45 kDa α- and 145 kDa β-subunits (1,2). The α-subunit and the amino-terminal region of the β-subunit form the extracellular domain. The remainder of the β-chain spans the plasma membrane and contains a cytoplasmic region with tyrosine kinase activity. Interaction of Met with HGF results in autophosphorylation at multiple tyrosines, which recruit several downstream signaling components, including Gab1, c-Cbl, and PI3 kinase (3). These fundamental events are important for all of the biological functions involving Met kinase activity. The addition of a phosphate at cytoplasmic Tyr1003 is essential for Met protein ubiquitination and degradation (4). Phosphorylation at Tyr1234/1235 in the Met kinase domain is critical for kinase activation. Phosphorylation at Tyr1349 in the Met cytoplasmic domain provides a direct binding site for Gab1 (5). Research studies have shown that altered Met levels and/or tyrosine kinase activities are found in several types of tumors, including renal, colon, and breast. Thus, investigators have concluded that Met is an attractive potential cancer therapeutic and diagnostic target (6,7).

$262
3 nmol
300 µl
SignalSilence® p38γ MAPK siRNA I from Cell Signaling Technology (CST) allows the researcher to specifically inhibit p38γ MAPK expression using RNA interference, a method whereby gene expression can be selectively silenced through the delivery of double stranded RNA molecules into the cell. All SignalSilence® siRNA products from CST are rigorously tested in-house and have been shown to reduce target protein expression by western analysis.
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: p38 MAP kinase (MAPK), also called RK (1) or CSBP (2), is the mammalian orthologue of the yeast HOG kinase that participates in a signaling cascade controlling cellular responses to cytokines and stress (1-4). Four isoforms of p38 MAPK, p38α, β, γ (also known as Erk6 or SAPK3), and δ (also known as SAPK4) have been identified. Similar to the SAPK/JNK pathway, p38 MAPK is activated by a variety of cellular stresses including osmotic shock, inflammatory cytokines, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), UV light, and growth factors (1-5). MKK3, MKK6, and SEK activate p38 MAPK by phosphorylation at Thr180 and Tyr182. Activated p38 MAPK has been shown to phosphorylate and activate MAPKAP kinase 2 (3) and to phosphorylate the transcription factors ATF-2 (5), Max (6), and MEF2 (5-8). SB203580 (4-(4-fluorophenyl)-2-(4-methylsulfinylphenyl)-5-(4-pyridyl)-imidazole) is a selective inhibitor of p38 MAPK. This compound inhibits the activation of MAPKAPK-2 by p38 MAPK and subsequent phosphorylation of HSP27 (9). SB203580 inhibits p38 MAPK catalytic activity by binding to the ATP-binding pocket, but does not inhibit phosphorylation of p38 MAPK by upstream kinases (10).

$262
3 nmol
300 µl
SignalSilence® EWS siRNA II from Cell Signaling Technology (CST) allows the researcher to specifically inhibit EWS expression using RNA interference, a method whereby gene expression can be selectively silenced through the delivery of double stranded RNA molecules into the cell. All SignalSilence® siRNA products from CST are rigorously tested in-house and have been shown to reduce target protein expression by western analysis.
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: The Ewing sarcoma (EWS) protein is a member of the multifunctional FET (FUS, EWS, and TAF15) family of proteins (1,2). These proteins are RNA and DNA binding proteins that are thought to be important for both transcriptional regulation and RNA processing. EWS can be found as part of a fusion protein with various E-twenty six (ETS) family transcription factors, most commonly Fli-1, in the Ewing sarcoma family of tumors (1-4). The amino terminus of the EWS protein, containing the transcriptional activation domain, is fused to the DNA binding domain of the ETS transcription factor, causing aberrant expression of target genes (1-5). EWS interacts with the transcription initiation complex via TFIID and RNA polymerase II subunits, as well as transcriptional regulators, such as Brn3A and CBP/p300, which suggests a role for EWS in transcriptional regulation (1,6-9). EWS also interacts with multiple components of the splicing machinery, implicating a role for EWS in RNA processing (1,10-12). EWS regulates the expression of cyclin D1, which controls G1-S phase transition during the cell cycle, at the level of transcriptional activation and mRNA splicing. The EWS-Fli-1 fusion protein has been shown to promote the expression of the cyclin D1b splice variant in Ewing sarcoma cells (13). In addition, EWS regulates the DNA damage-induced alternative splicing of genes involved in DNA repair and stress response and is required for cell viability upon DNA damage (14). Consistent with these results, EWS knockout mice display hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation and premature cellular senescence, suggesting a role for EWS in homologous recombination and maintenance of genomic stability (15).

$262
3 nmol
300 µl
SignalSilence® AUF1/hnRNP D siRNA I from Cell Signaling Technology (CST) allows the researcher to specifically inhibit AUF1/hnRNP D expression using RNA interference, a method whereby gene expression can be selectively silenced through the delivery of double stranded RNA molecules into the cell. All SignalSilence® siRNA products from CST are rigorously tested in-house and have been shown to reduce target protein expression by western analysis.
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: AU-rich element RNA binding protein 1 (AUF1) is also known as heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein D (hnRNP D). AUF1 binds to the AU rich element (ARE) of target mRNA and regulates mRNA decay (1,2). It has a broad range of target genes including IL-1, IL-2, IL-3, Myc, TNF-α, and cyclin D1 (2). Binding of AUF1 to Myc mRNA also affects translation of Myc (3). Recent studies have provided evidence that AUF1 is also involved in the regulation of transcription. AUF1 binds to the promoters of various genes including complement receptor 2 (4), enkephalin (5), and α-fetoprotein (6). AUF1 also binds to the telomerase catalytic subunit Tert promoter and the G-rich telomeric repeat, thus regulating telomere maintenance and normal aging (7,8). AUF1 has four isoforms produced by alternative splicing of a single transcript: p37, p40, p42, and p45 (9,10). All AUF1 isoforms shuttle between the nucleus and cytoplasm (11, 12). These isoforms have distinct localization and bind to different target mRNAs that contribute to the diversity of AUF1 function (2).

$262
3 nmol
300 µl
SignalSilence® p38β MAPK siRNA I from Cell Signaling Technology (CST) allows the researcher to specifically inhibit p38β MAPK expression using RNA interference, a method whereby gene expression can be selectively silenced through the delivery of double stranded RNA molecules into the cell. All SignalSilence® siRNA products from CST are rigorously tested in-house and have been shown to reduce target protein expression by western analysis.
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: p38 MAP kinase (MAPK), also called RK (1) or CSBP (2), is the mammalian orthologue of the yeast HOG kinase that participates in a signaling cascade controlling cellular responses to cytokines and stress (1-4). Four isoforms of p38 MAPK, p38α, β, γ (also known as Erk6 or SAPK3), and δ (also known as SAPK4) have been identified. Similar to the SAPK/JNK pathway, p38 MAPK is activated by a variety of cellular stresses including osmotic shock, inflammatory cytokines, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), UV light, and growth factors (1-5). MKK3, MKK6, and SEK activate p38 MAPK by phosphorylation at Thr180 and Tyr182. Activated p38 MAPK has been shown to phosphorylate and activate MAPKAP kinase 2 (3) and to phosphorylate the transcription factors ATF-2 (5), Max (6), and MEF2 (5-8). SB203580 (4-(4-fluorophenyl)-2-(4-methylsulfinylphenyl)-5-(4-pyridyl)-imidazole) is a selective inhibitor of p38 MAPK. This compound inhibits the activation of MAPKAPK-2 by p38 MAPK and subsequent phosphorylation of HSP27 (9). SB203580 inhibits p38 MAPK catalytic activity by binding to the ATP-binding pocket, but does not inhibit phosphorylation of p38 MAPK by upstream kinases (10).

$262
3 nmol
300 µl
SignalSilence® PARP siRNA I from Cell Signaling Technology (CST) allows the researcher to specifically inhibit PARP expression using RNA interference, a method whereby gene expression can be selectively silenced through the delivery of double stranded RNA molecules into the cell. All SignalSilence® siRNA products from CST are rigorously tested in-house and have been shown to reduce target protein expression by western analysis.
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: PARP, a 116 kDa nuclear poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase, appears to be involved in DNA repair in response to environmental stress (1). This protein can be cleaved by many ICE-like caspases in vitro (2,3) and is one of the main cleavage targets of caspase-3 in vivo (4,5). In human PARP, the cleavage occurs between Asp214 and Gly215, which separates the PARP amino-terminal DNA binding domain (24 kDa) from the carboxy-terminal catalytic domain (89 kDa) (2,4). PARP helps cells to maintain their viability; cleavage of PARP facilitates cellular disassembly and serves as a marker of cells undergoing apoptosis (6).

$262
3 nmol
300 µl
SignalSilence® Dicer siRNA I from Cell Signaling Technology (CST) allows the researcher to specifically inhibit dicer expression using RNA interference, a method whereby gene expression can be selectively silenced through the delivery of double stranded RNA molecules into the cell. All SignalSilence® siRNA products from CST are rigorously tested in-house and have been shown to reduce target protein expression by western analysis.
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: Dicer is a member of the RNase III family that specifically cleaves double-stranded RNAs to generate microRNAs (miRNAs) (1). After long primary transcript pri-miRNAs are processed to stem-looped pre-miRNAs by Drosha (2), pre-miRNAs are transported to the cytoplasm and further processed by Dicer to produce 22-nucleotide mature miRNAs (3). The mature miRNA then becomes a part of the RNA-Induced Silencing Complex (RISC) and can bind to the 3' UTR of the target mRNA (3).

$262
3 nmol
300 µl
SignalSilence® Dicer siRNA II from Cell Signaling Technology (CST) allows the researcher to specifically inhibit dicer expression using RNA interference, a method whereby gene expression can be selectively silenced through the delivery of double stranded RNA molecules into the cell. All SignalSilence® siRNA products from CST are rigorously tested in-house and have been shown to reduce target protein expression by western analysis.
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: Dicer is a member of the RNase III family that specifically cleaves double-stranded RNAs to generate microRNAs (miRNAs) (1). After long primary transcript pri-miRNAs are processed to stem-looped pre-miRNAs by Drosha (2), pre-miRNAs are transported to the cytoplasm and further processed by Dicer to produce 22-nucleotide mature miRNAs (3). The mature miRNA then becomes a part of the RNA-Induced Silencing Complex (RISC) and can bind to the 3' UTR of the target mRNA (3).

$262
3 nmol
300 µl
SignalSilence® Stat6 siRNA II from Cell Signaling Technology (CST) allows the researcher to specifically inhibit Stat6 expression using RNA interference, a method whereby gene expression can be selectively silenced through the delivery of double stranded RNA molecules into the cell. All SignalSilence® siRNA products from CST are rigorously tested in-house and have been shown to reduce target protein expression by western analysis.
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Background: Upon activation by Janus kinases, Stat6 translocates to the nucleus where it regulates cytokine-induced gene expression. Stat6 is activated via phosphorylation at Tyr641 and is required for responsiveness to IL-4 and IL-13 (1-4). In addition, Stat6 is activated by IFN-α in B cells, where it forms transcriptionally active complexes with Stat2 and p48 (5,6). Protein phosphatase 2A is also involved in regulation of IL-4-mediated Stat6 signaling (7).

$262
3 nmol
300 µl
SignalSilence® FoxO3a siRNA I from Cell Signaling Technology (CST) allows the researcher to specifically inhibit FoxO3a expression using RNA interference, a method whereby gene expression can be selectively silenced through the delivery of double stranded RNA molecules into the cell. All SignalSilence® siRNA products from CST are rigorously tested in-house and have been shown to reduce target protein expression by western analysis.
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: The Forkhead family of transcription factors is involved in tumorigenesis of rhabdomyosarcoma and acute leukemias (1-3). Within the family, three members (FoxO1, FoxO4, and FoxO3a) have sequence similarity to the nematode orthologue DAF-16, which mediates signaling via a pathway involving IGFR1, PI3K, and Akt (4-6). Active forkhead members act as tumor suppressors by promoting cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Increased expression of any FoxO member results in the activation of the cell cycle inhibitor p27 Kip1. Forkhead transcription factors also play a part in TGF-β-mediated upregulation of p21 Cip1, a process negatively regulated through PI3K (7). Increased proliferation results when forkhead transcription factors are inactivated through phosphorylation by Akt at Thr24, Ser256, and Ser319, which results in nuclear export and inhibition of transcription factor activity (8). Forkhead transcription factors can also be inhibited by the deacetylase sirtuin (SirT1) (9).

$262
3 nmol
300 µl
SignalSilence® PARP siRNA I (Mouse Specific) from Cell Signaling Technology (CST) allows the researcher to specifically inhibit PARP expression using RNA interference, a method whereby gene expression can be selectively silenced through the delivery of double stranded RNA molecules into the cell. All SignalSilence® siRNA products from CST are rigorously tested in-house and have been shown to reduce target protein expression by western analysis.
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Background: PARP, a 116 kDa nuclear poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase, appears to be involved in DNA repair in response to environmental stress (1). This protein can be cleaved by many ICE-like caspases in vitro (2,3) and is one of the main cleavage targets of caspase-3 in vivo (4,5). In human PARP, the cleavage occurs between Asp214 and Gly215, which separates the PARP amino-terminal DNA binding domain (24 kDa) from the carboxy-terminal catalytic domain (89 kDa) (2,4). PARP helps cells to maintain their viability; cleavage of PARP facilitates cellular disassembly and serves as a marker of cells undergoing apoptosis (6).

$262
3 nmol
300 µl
SignalSilence® PARP siRNA II (Mouse Specific) from Cell Signaling Technology (CST) allows the researcher to specifically inhibit PARP expression using RNA interference, a method whereby gene expression can be selectively silenced through the delivery of double stranded RNA molecules into the cell. All SignalSilence® siRNA products from CST are rigorously tested in-house and have been shown to reduce target protein expression by western analysis.
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Background: PARP, a 116 kDa nuclear poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase, appears to be involved in DNA repair in response to environmental stress (1). This protein can be cleaved by many ICE-like caspases in vitro (2,3) and is one of the main cleavage targets of caspase-3 in vivo (4,5). In human PARP, the cleavage occurs between Asp214 and Gly215, which separates the PARP amino-terminal DNA binding domain (24 kDa) from the carboxy-terminal catalytic domain (89 kDa) (2,4). PARP helps cells to maintain their viability; cleavage of PARP facilitates cellular disassembly and serves as a marker of cells undergoing apoptosis (6).

$262
3 nmol
300 µl
SignalSilence® Glucocorticoid Receptor siRNA I from Cell Signaling Technology (CST) allows the researcher to specifically inhibit glucocorticoid receptor expression using RNA interference, a method whereby gene expression can be selectively silenced through the delivery of double stranded RNA molecules into the cell. All SignalSilence® siRNA products from CST are rigorously tested in-house and have been shown to reduce target protein expression by western analysis.
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: Glucocorticoid hormones control cellular proliferation, inflammation, and metabolism through their association with the glucocorticoid receptor (GR)/NR3C1, a member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily of transcription factors (1). GR is composed of several conserved structural elements, including a carboxy-terminal ligand-binding domain (which also contains residues critical for receptor dimerization and hormone-dependent gene transactivation), a neighboring hinge region containing nuclear localization signals, a central zinc-finger-containing DNA-binding domain, and an amino-terminal variable region that participates in ligand-independent gene transcription. In the absence of hormone, a significant population of GR is localized to the cytoplasm in an inactive form via its association with regulatory chaperone proteins, such as HSP90, HSP70, and FKBP52. On hormone binding, GR is released from the chaperone complex and translocates to the nucleus as a dimer to associate with specific DNA sequences termed glucocorticoid response elements (GREs), thereby enhancing or repressing transcription of specific target genes (2). It was demonstrated that GR-mediated transcriptional activation is modulated by phosphorylation (3-5). Although GR can be basally phosphorylated in the absence of hormone, it becomes hyperphosphorylated upon binding receptor agonists. It has been suggested that hormone-dependent phosphorylation of GR may determine target promoter specificity, cofactor interaction, strength and duration of receptor signaling, receptor stability, and receptor subcellular localization (3).

$262
3 nmol
300 µl
SignalSilence® CDK2 siRNA II from Cell Signaling Technology (CST) allows the researcher to specifically inhibit CDK2 expression using RNA interference, a method whereby gene expression can be selectively silenced through the delivery of double stranded RNA molecules into the cell. All SignalSilence® siRNA products from CST are rigorously tested in-house and have been shown to reduce target protein expression by western analysis.
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: Cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (p33CDK2) is an important component of the cell cycle machinery. Like p34cdc2, kinase activity is regulated by phosphorylation state as well as association with a cyclin subunit and a CDK inhibitor. Inhibitory phosphorylation occurs on Thr14 and Tyr15 (1). Inhibition of CDK2-cyclin complexes can also be attributed to association with p27 Kip1 and p21 Waf1/Cip1 (2). Activation of CDK2 complexes requires dephosphorylation of Thr14 and Tyr15 by cdc25 phosphatase and phosphorylation of Thr160 (3), which is mediated by CAK, a complex of CDK7 and cyclin H (4). CDK2/cyclin E kinase activity is important for the G1 to S transition and phosphorylation of the Rb protein. During S-phase, active CDK2/cyclin A complexes predominate and phosphorylate E2F and the active CDK2 complex persists in the nucleus throughout G2 (5).

$262
3 nmol
300 µl
SignalSilence® Glucocorticoid receptor siRNA II from Cell Signaling Technology (CST) allows the researcher to specifically inhibit glucocorticoid receptor expression using RNA interference, a method whereby gene expression can be selectively silenced through the delivery of double stranded RNA molecules into the cell. All SignalSilence® siRNA products from CST are rigorously tested in-house and have been shown to reduce target protein expression by western analysis.
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: Glucocorticoid hormones control cellular proliferation, inflammation, and metabolism through their association with the glucocorticoid receptor (GR)/NR3C1, a member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily of transcription factors (1). GR is composed of several conserved structural elements, including a carboxy-terminal ligand-binding domain (which also contains residues critical for receptor dimerization and hormone-dependent gene transactivation), a neighboring hinge region containing nuclear localization signals, a central zinc-finger-containing DNA-binding domain, and an amino-terminal variable region that participates in ligand-independent gene transcription. In the absence of hormone, a significant population of GR is localized to the cytoplasm in an inactive form via its association with regulatory chaperone proteins, such as HSP90, HSP70, and FKBP52. On hormone binding, GR is released from the chaperone complex and translocates to the nucleus as a dimer to associate with specific DNA sequences termed glucocorticoid response elements (GREs), thereby enhancing or repressing transcription of specific target genes (2). It was demonstrated that GR-mediated transcriptional activation is modulated by phosphorylation (3-5). Although GR can be basally phosphorylated in the absence of hormone, it becomes hyperphosphorylated upon binding receptor agonists. It has been suggested that hormone-dependent phosphorylation of GR may determine target promoter specificity, cofactor interaction, strength and duration of receptor signaling, receptor stability, and receptor subcellular localization (3).