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1036
PU.1 Blocking Peptide
Experimental Controls

PU.1 Blocking Peptide #1036

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Product Usage Information

Use as a blocking reagent to evaluate the specificity of antibody reactivity in dot blot protocols.

Storage:

Supplied in 20 mM potassium phosphate (pH 7.0), 50 mM NaCl, 0.1 mM EDTA, 1 mg/ml BSA, 5% glycerol and 1% DMSO. Store at –20°C.

Product Description

This peptide is used to specifically block PU.1 (9G7) Rabbit mAb #2258 reactivity.

Quality Control

The quality of the peptide was evaluated by reversed-phase HPLC and by mass spectrometry. The peptide reacts with PU.1 (9G7) Rabbit mAb #2258 by dot blot.

Background

PU.1 is a member of the Ets family of transcription factors and activates target genes through the purine-rich PU-box (1). PU.1 plays a pivotal role in the differentiation of myeloid cells and lymphocytes and is expressed in several hematopoietic cells including B lymphocytes, macrophages, neutrophils, mast cells, early erythroid cells, and megakaryocytes (1,2). The concentration of PU.1 is critical for both the determination of hematopoietic cell lineage and the regulation of differentiation versus stem cell proliferation (3,4). In addition, PU.1 activity is influenced by phosphorylation and interactions with other hematopoietic transcription factors. Phosphorylation of PU.1 at Ser146 by CK2 promotes binding to IRF4 and synergistic activation through the immunoglobulin κ 3' enhancer (5). Treatment of pro-B cells with IL-3 leads to phosphorylation of PU.1 at Ser140, resulting in increased PU.1 activity and activation of the anti-apoptotic gene MCL-1 (6). GATA1 binding blocks PU.1 activity during erythroid cell development (7). Overexpression of PU.1 resulting from proviral insertion during Friend virus infection can induce erythroleukemia, while reduced expression has been associated with acute myeloid leukemia (8).

  1. Lloberas, J. et al. (1999) Immunol Today 20, 184-9.
  2. Klemsz, M.J. et al. (1990) Cell 61, 113-24.
  3. Dahl, R. and Simon, M.C. (2003) Blood Cells Mol Dis 31, 229-33.
  4. DeKoter, R.P. and Singh, H. (2000) Science 288, 1439-41.
  5. Pongubala, J.M. et al. (1993) Science 259, 1622-5.
  6. Wang, J.M. et al. (2003) Mol Cell Biol 23, 1896-909.
  7. Zhang, P. et al. (1999) Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 96, 8705-10.
  8. Moreau-Gachelin, F. et al. (1988) Nature 331, 277-80.

Pathways & Proteins

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For Research Use Only. Not For Use In Diagnostic Procedures.

Cell Signaling Technology is a trademark of Cell Signaling Technology, Inc.

Important Ordering Details

Custom Ordering Details: This product is assembled upon order. Please allow up to three weeks for your product to be processed.