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Santa Cruz discontinued a large number of its polyclonal products as a result of the USDA settlement that was made public May 19th 2016

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PhosphoSitePlus® Resource

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Western Blotting

Western blot analysis of Smad2/3 Control Cell Extracts from HT-1080 cells, untreated (-) or treated with hTGF-β3 #8425 (10 ng/ml, 30 min; +), using Phospho-Smad2 (Ser465/467) (138D4) Rabbit mAb #3108 (upper) or Smad2 (86F7) Rabbit mAb #3122 (lower).

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Product Description

Nonphosphorylated Smad2/3 Control Cell Extracts: Total cell extracts from HT-1080 cells, serum-starved overnight without treatment, serve as a negative control. Supplied in SDS Sample Buffer. Phosphorylated Smad2/3 Control Cell Extracts: Total cell extracts from HT-1080 cells, serum-starved overnight and treated with hTGF-β3 #8425 (10 ng/ml, 30 min), serve as a positive control. Supplied in SDS Sample Buffer.


Members of the Smad family of signal transduction molecules are components of a critical intracellular pathway that transmit TGF-β signals from the cell surface into the nucleus. Three distinct classes of Smads have been defined: the receptor-regulated Smads (R-Smads), which include Smad1, 2, 3, 5, and 8; the common-mediator Smad (co-Smad), Smad4; and the antagonistic or inhibitory Smads (I-Smads), Smad6 and 7 (1-5). Activated type I receptors associate with specific R-Smads and phosphorylate them on a conserved carboxy terminal SSXS motif. The phosphorylated R-Smad dissociates from the receptor and forms a heteromeric complex with the co-Smad (Smad4), allowing translocation of the complex to the nucleus. Once in the nucleus, Smads can target a variety of DNA binding proteins to regulate transcriptional responses (6-8).


1.  Heldin, C.H. et al. (1997) Nature 390, 465-71.

2.  Attisano, L. and Wrana, J.L. (1998) Curr Opin Cell Biol 10, 188-94.

3.  Derynck, R. et al. (1998) Cell 95, 737-40.

4.  Massagué, J. (1998) Annu Rev Biochem 67, 753-91.

5.  Whitman, M. (1998) Genes Dev 12, 2445-62.

6.  Wu, G. et al. (2000) Science 287, 92-7.

7.  Attisano, L. and Wrana, J.L. (2002) Science 296, 1646-7.

8.  Moustakas, A. et al. (2001) J Cell Sci 114, 4359-69.



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Smad2/3 Control Cell Extracts