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77627
Phospho-Sox2 (Ser250/Ser251) Antibody
Primary Antibodies

Phospho-Sox2 (Ser250/Ser251) Antibody #77627

This product is discontinued

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# Product Name Application Reactivity
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H M
Storage:

Supplied in 10 mM sodium HEPES (pH 7.5), 150 mM NaCl, 100 µg/ml BSA and 50% glycerol. Store at –20°C. Do not aliquot the antibody.

Phospho-Sox2 (Ser250/Ser251) Antibody recognizes endogenous levels of Sox2 protein when dually or singly phosphorylated at Ser250 and Ser251.

Polyclonal antibodies are produced by immunizing animals with a synthetic phosphopeptide corresponding to residues surrounding Ser250/Ser251 of human Sox2 protein. Antibodies are purified by protein A and peptide affinity chromatography.

Embryonic stem cells (ESC) derived from the inner cell mass of the blastocyst are unique in their pluripotent capacity and potential for self-renewal (1). Research studies demonstrate that a set of transcription factors that includes Oct-4, Sox2, and Nanog forms a transcriptional network that maintains cells in a pluripotent state (2,3). Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments show that Sox2 and Oct-4 bind to thousands of gene regulatory sites, many of which regulate cell pluripotency and early embryonic development (4,5). siRNA knockdown of either Sox2 or Oct-4 results in loss of pluripotency (6). Induced overexpression of Oct-4 and Sox2, along with additional transcription factors Klf4 and c-Myc, can reprogram both mouse and human somatic cells to a pluripotent state (7,8). Additional evidence demonstrates that Sox2 is also present in adult multipotent progenitors that give rise to some adult epithelial tissues, including several glands, the glandular stomach, testes, and cervix. Sox2 is thought to regulate target gene expression important for survival and regeneration of these tissues (9).

Phosphorylation on these and other sites on Sox2 have been observed in pluripotent cells as they undergo differentiation, although the mechanism and consequence of this potential regulation is not clear (10).

  1. Conley, B.J. et al. (2004) Int J Biochem Cell Biol 36, 555-67.
  2. Pesce, M. and Schöler, H.R. (2001) Stem Cells 19, 271-8.
  3. Pan, G. and Thomson, J.A. (2007) Cell Res 17, 42-9.
  4. Boyer, L.A. et al. (2005) Cell 122, 947-56.
  5. Loh, Y.H. et al. (2006) Nat Genet 38, 431-40.
  6. Matin, M.M. et al. (2004) Stem Cells 22, 659-68.
  7. Takahashi, K. and Yamanaka, S. (2006) Cell 126, 663-76.
  8. Okita, K. et al. (2007) Nature 448, 313-7.
  9. Arnold, K. et al. (2011) Cell Stem Cell 9, 317-29.
  10. Van Hoof, D. et al. (2009) Cell Stem Cell 5, 214-26.
Entrez-Gene Id
6657
Swiss-Prot Acc.
P48431
For Research Use Only. Not For Use In Diagnostic Procedures.

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