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Antibody Sampler Kit Peroxisome

Also showing Antibody Sampler Kit Peroxisomal Membrane

The Mitochondrial Dynamics Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means to examine signaling involved in mitochondrial dynamics. The kit contains enough primary antibody to perform two western blot experiments.

Background: Import of proteins into the mitochondria is regulated by the translocase of the outer mitochondrial membrane (TOM) complex, which facilitates transport through the outer mitochondrial membrane, and a complementary translocase of the inner membrane (TIM) complex, responsible for protein transport to the mitochondrial matrix. The TOM complex consists of the receptors Tom20, Tom22, and Tom70, and the channel-forming protein Tom40 (1). Tom20 is localized in the outer mitochondrial membrane and initially recognizes precursors with a presequence to facilitate protein import across the outer mitochondrial membrane (2).Changes in mitochondrial dynamics regulated by environmental cues affect mitochondrial size and shape and have been shown to dramatically impact mitochondrial metabolism, apoptosis, and autophagy (3). These processes are largely controlled by mitochondrial dynamin-related GTPases, including mitofusin-1, mitofusin-2, OPA1, and DRP1. DRP1 regulates mitochondrial fission, while the mitofusins and OPA1 control fusion at the outer and inner mitochondrial membrane, respectively. These proteins are tightly regulated. OPA1 activity is regulated through alternative splicing and post-translational modifications, including complex proteolytic processing by multiple proteases (4-9). In addition, OPA1 expression can be induced under conditions of metabolic demand through a pathway involving Parkin induced NF-κB activation (10). DRP1 is regulated in part through multiple phosphorylation sites (11). Phosphorylation of DRP1 at Ser616 by MAPK or during mitosis by CDKs stimulates mitochondrial fission (12-14). Mitochondrial fission factor (MFF) is a tail-anchored protein that resides within the outer mitochondrial membrane and is part of the mitochondrial fission complex. MFF participates in mitochondrial fission by serving as one of multiple receptors for the GTPase dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) (15-18). AMPK directly phosphorylates MFF at two sites to allow for enhanced recruitment of Drp1 to the mitochondria (19). 

The Autophagy Vesicle Nucleation Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of detecting target proteins involved in autophagosome formation and maturation. The kit contains enough antibody to perform two western blot experiments per primary antibody.
The Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle Sampler Kit provides an economical means of detecting select components involved in tricarboxylic acid cycle. The kit contains enough primary antibodies to perform at least two western blot experiments per antibody.

Background: The tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle includes various enzymatic reactions that constitute a key part of cellular aerobic respiration. The transport of the glycolytic end product pyruvate into mitochondria and the decarboxylation of pyruvate in the TCA cycle generate energy through oxidative phosphorylation under aerobic conditions (1,2). Two inner mitochondrial membrane proteins, mitochondrial pyruvate carrier 1 (MPC1) and mitochondrial pyruvate carrier 2 (MPC2), form a 150 kDa complex and are essential proteins in the facilitated transport of pyruvate into mitochondria (1,2). Citrate synthase catalyzes the first and rate-limiting reaction of the TCA cycle (3). Mitochondrial aconitase 2 (ACO2) catalyzes the conversion of citrate to isocitrate via cis-aconitate (4). IDH1 and IDH2 are two of the three isocitrate dehydrogenases that catalyze oxidative decarboxylation of isocitrate to α-ketoglutarate (α-KG) (5). IDH1 functions as a tumor suppressor in the cytoplasm and peroxisomes, whereas IDH2 is in mitochondria and is involved in the TCA cycle (5). Mutations in IDH2 have also been identified in malignant gliomas (6). Dihydrolipoamide succinyltransferase (DLST) is a subunit of the α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex, a key enzymatic complex in the TCA cycle (7). Succinate dehydrogenase subunit A (SDHA) is a component of the TCA cycle and the electron transport chain and is involved in the oxidation of succinate (8). Fumarase catalyzes the conversion of fumarate to malate (9). Fumarase deficiency leads to the accumulation of fumarate, an oncometabolite that has been shown to promote epithelial-to-mesenchymal-transition (EMT), a developmental process that has been implicated in oncogenesis (10).

The PI3 Kinase Sampler Kit provides an economical means of studying PI3 kinase subunits in cells. The kit contains enough primary and secondary antibodies to perform two Western blot experiments per primary antibody.

Background: Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) catalyzes the production of phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-triphosphate by phosphorylating phosphatidylinositol (PI), phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate (PIP), and phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2). Growth factors and hormones trigger this phosphorylation event, which in turn coordinates cell growth, cell cycle entry, cell migration, and cell survival (1). PTEN reverses this process, and research studies have shown that the PI3K signaling pathway is constitutively activated in human cancers that have loss of function of PTEN (2). PI3Ks are composed of a catalytic subunit (p110) and a regulatory subunit. Various isoforms of the catalytic subunit (p110α, p110β, p110γ, and p110δ) have been isolated, and the regulatory subunits that associate with p110α, p110β, and p110δ are p85α and p85β (3). In contrast, p110γ associates with a p101 regulatory subunit that is unrelated to p85. Furthermore, p110γ is activated by βγ subunits of heterotrimeric G proteins (4).

The Cell Fractionation Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means for determining the purity of each distinctly separated subcellular fraction by western blot using Cell Signaling Technology's Cell Fractionation Kit #9038. This antibody sampler kit includes enough primary antibody to perform at least two western blots per primary antibody.
The Phospho-Erk1/2 Pathway Sampler Kit provides an economical means of evaluating multiple members of the Erk pathway as well as their activation state. The kit contains enough primary and secondary antibodies to perform two Western blot experiments.

Background: Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are a widely conserved family of serine/threonine protein kinases involved in many cellular programs, such as cell proliferation, differentiation, motility, and death. The p44/42 MAPK (Erk1/2) signaling pathway can be activated in response to a diverse range of extracellular stimuli including mitogens, growth factors, and cytokines (1-3), and research investigators consider it an important target in the diagnosis and treatment of cancer (4). Upon stimulation, a sequential three-part protein kinase cascade is initiated, consisting of a MAP kinase kinase kinase (MAPKKK or MAP3K), a MAP kinase kinase (MAPKK or MAP2K), and a MAP kinase (MAPK). Multiple p44/42 MAP3Ks have been identified, including members of the Raf family, as well as Mos and Tpl2/COT. MEK1 and MEK2 are the primary MAPKKs in this pathway (5,6). MEK1 and MEK2 activate p44 and p42 through phosphorylation of activation loop residues Thr202/Tyr204 and Thr185/Tyr187, respectively. Several downstream targets of p44/42 have been identified, including p90RSK (7) and the transcription factor Elk-1 (8,9). p44/42 are negatively regulated by a family of dual-specificity (Thr/Tyr) MAPK phosphatases, known as DUSPs or MKPs (10), along with MEK inhibitors, such as U0126 and PD98059.

The Innate Immunity Activation Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of detecting the activation of multiple signaling pathways involved in innate immunity using phospho-specific, cleavage-specific, and control antibodies. The kit contains enough primary antibodies to perform at least two western blot experiments.

Background: The innate immune system responds rapidly to pathogens by detecting conserved pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and damage/danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) through pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). There are several families of PRRs. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are transmembrane PRRs and signal through recruitment of adaptor proteins, including MyD88, which leads to recruitment and phosphorylation of IRAK1 and IRAK4, followed by activation of NF-κB and MAP kinases (1-3). Some TLRs also activate IRFs, which upregulate the type I interferon response. Activation of TLR3 and TLR4 results in phosphorylation and activation of IRF-3, while TLR7, TLR8, and TLR9 lead to activation of IRF-7 (2, 3). STING is a multi-pass ER transmembrane protein that is activated in response to intracellular DNA downstream of DNA-sensing cytoplasmic PRRs, such as DDX41, or by binding the second messenger cyclic-GMP-AMP (cGAMP) produced by cGAS (4-6). Following activation, STING translocates with TBK1 to perinuclear endosomes, leading to phosphorylation and activation of IRF-3 and NF-κB (7, 8). Following activation and translocation, STING gets phosphorylated by ULK1, resulting in STING inactivation and degradation (9). Inflammasomes are cytoplasmic multimeric protein complexes that assemble in response to PAMPs or DAMPs detected by AIM2 or members of the nod-like receptor (NLR) family, such as NLRP3 (10). Inflammasomes activate Caspase-1, which cleaves the IL-1β and IL-18 precursor proteins into the mature forms (10).

The Mitochondrial Marker Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means to evaluate relevant mitochondial proteins. This kit contains enough primary antibody to perform two western blots per primary.
The Vesicle Trafficking Antibody Sampler kit provides an economical means to analyze proteins involved in the intracellular transport of cargo proteins. This kit includes enough primary and secondary antibody to perform two western blot experiments.
The Vimentin Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means to detect total levels of vimentin, vimentin phosphorylated at Ser56, and vimentin phosphorylated at Ser82. The kit contains enough primary and secondary antibody to perform two western blot experiments.

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: microfilaments (actin filaments), intermediate filaments, and microtubules. Major types of intermediate filaments are distinguished by their cell-specific expression: cytokeratins (epithelial cells), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) (glial cells), desmin (skeletal, visceral, and certain vascular smooth muscle cells), vimentin (mesenchyme origin), and neurofilaments (neurons). GFAP and vimentin form intermediate filaments in astroglial cells and modulate their motility and shape (1). In particular, vimentin filaments are present at early developmental stages, while GFAP filaments are characteristic of differentiated and mature brain astrocytes. Thus, GFAP is commonly used as a marker for intracranial and intraspinal tumors arising from astrocytes (2). Research studies have shown that vimentin is present in sarcomas, but not carcinomas, and its expression is examined in conjunction with that of other markers to distinguish between the two (3). Vimentin's dynamic structural changes and spatial re-organization in response to extracellular stimuli help to coordinate various signaling pathways (4). Phosphorylation of vimentin at Ser56 in smooth muscle cells regulates the structural arrangement of vimentin filaments in response to serotonin (5,6). Remodeling of vimentin and other intermediate filaments is important during lymphocyte adhesion and migration through the endothelium (7).During mitosis, CDK1 phosphorylates vimentin at Ser56. This phosphorylation provides a PLK binding site for vimentin-PLK interaction. PLK further phosphorylates vimentin at Ser82, which might serve as memory phosphorylation site and play a regulatory role in vimentin filament disassembly (8,9). Additionally, studies using various soft-tissue sarcoma cells have shown that phosphorylation of vimentin at Ser39 by Akt1 enhances cell migration and survival, suggesting that vimentin could be a potential target for soft-tissue sarcoma targeted therapy (10,11).

The Mouse-Reactive STING Pathway Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of detecting activation and expression of key components of the STING pathway using phospho-specific and control antibodies. The kit includes enough antibody to perform two western blot experiments with each primary antibody.

Background: Stimulator of interferon genes (STING, TMEM173, MITA) is a transmembrane adaptor protein that is a critical component of the cellular innate immune response to pathogenic cytoplasmic DNA (1,2). STING is a ubiquitously expressed protein found predominantly in the ER (1). The enzyme cGAMP synthase (cGAS) produces the second messenger cyclic-GMP-AMP (cGAMP) in response to cytoplasmic DNA (3,4). cGAMP binds and activates STING (3,4). In addition, detection of cytoplasmic DNA by nucleic acid sensors, including DDX41 or IFI16, results in STING activation (5,6). Following activation, STING translocates with TBK1 to perinuclear endosomes and gets phosphorylated by ULK1 at Ser366 (Ser365 in mouse) (7, 8). The TBK1 kinase phosphorylates and activates IRF-3 and NF-κB, which leads to the induction of type I interferon and other immune response genes (1,2,7).

The Endosomal Marker Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of distinguishing endosomes in the early, late, and recycling phases. The kit includes enough antibody to perform two western blot experiments with each primary antibody.