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Antibody Sampler Kit Regulation of Neuron Differentiation

The Rho-GTPase Antibody Sampler Kit contains reagents to examine aspects of cell migration, adhesion, proliferation and differentiation in cells. This kit includes enough primary and secondary antibodies to perform two Western blot experiments per each primary antibody.
The Cardiogenesis Marker Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of evaluating proteins involved in heart development. This kit contains enough antibody to perform two western blot experiments per primary antibody.
The 14-3-3 Family Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means to investigate the expression of various 14-3-3 isoforms within the cell. The kit contains enough primary and secondary antibodies to perform two Western blot experiments.

Background: The 14-3-3 family of proteins plays a key regulatory role in signal transduction, checkpoint control, apoptotic and nutrient-sensing pathways (1,2). 14-3-3 proteins are highly conserved and ubiquitously expressed. There are at least seven isoforms, β, γ, ε, σ, ζ, τ, and η that have been identified in mammals. The initially described α and δ isoforms are confirmed to be phosphorylated forms of β and ζ, respectively (3). Through their amino-terminal α helical region, 14-3-3 proteins form homo- or heterodimers that interact with a wide variety of proteins: transcription factors, metabolic enzymes, cytoskeletal proteins, kinases, phosphatases, and other signaling molecules (3,4). The interaction of 14-3-3 proteins with their targets is primarily through a phospho-Ser/Thr motif. However, binding to divergent phospho-Ser/Thr motifs, as well as phosphorylation independent interactions has been observed (4). 14-3-3 binding masks specific sequences of the target protein, and therefore, modulates target protein localization, phosphorylation state, stability, and molecular interactions (1-4). 14-3-3 proteins may also induce target protein conformational changes that modify target protein function (4,5). Distinct temporal and spatial expression patterns of 14-3-3 isoforms have been observed in development and in acute response to extracellular signals and drugs, suggesting that 14-3-3 isoforms may perform different functions despite their sequence similarities (4). Several studies suggest that 14-3-3 isoforms are differentially regulated in cancer and neurological syndromes (2,3).

Senescence Associated Secretory Phenotype (SASP) Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of detecting multiple components of the SASP. The kit includes enough antibody to perform two western blot experiments with each primary antibody.

Background: Senescence is characterized by stable stress-induced proliferative arrest and resistance to mitogenic stimuli, as well as the secretion of proteins such as cytokines, growth factors and proteases. These secreted proteins comprise the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP). Senescent cells are thought to accumulate as an organism ages, and contribute to age-related diseases, including cancer, through promotion of inflammation and disruption of normal cellular function (1,2). The composition of the SASP varies, and SASP components can be either beneficial or deleterious in human disease, depending on the context (3).Senescence Associated Secretory Phenotype (SASP) Antibody Sampler Kit provides a collection of antibodies to various SASP components, including TNF-alpha, interleukin-6 (IL-6), the multifunctional cytokine IL-1beta, the chemokines CXCL10, RANTES/CCL5 and MCP-1, the matrix metalloprotease MMP3, and the serine-protease inhibitor PAI-1.

The Pathological Hallmarks of Alzheimer's Disease Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of detecting the activation of Tau and APP family members using phospho-specific, and control antibodies for both proteins. The kit includes enough antibodies to perform two western blot experiments with each primary antibody.

Background: Tau is a heterogeneous microtubule-associated protein that promotes and stabilizes microtubule assembly, especially in axons. Six isoforms with different amino-terminal inserts and different numbers of tandem repeats near the carboxy terminus have been identified, and tau is hyperphosphorylated at approximately 25 sites by ERK, GSK-3, and CDK5 (1,2). Phosphorylation decreases the ability of tau to bind to microtubules. Neurofibrillary tangles are a major hallmark of Alzheimer's disease; these tangles are bundles of paired helical filaments composed of hyperphosphorylated tau. In particular, phosphorylation at Ser396 by GSK-3 or CDK5 destabilizes microtubules. Furthermore, research studies have shown that inclusions of tau are found in a number of other neurodegenerative diseases, collectively known as tauopathies (1,3). The cerebrospinal fluid concentration of tau phosphorylated at Thr181 has been proposed to be a biomarker for the study of neurodegenerative disorders (4).Amyloid β (Aβ) precursor protein (APP) is a 100-140 kDa transmembrane glycoprotein that exists as several isoforms (4). The amino acid sequence of APP contains the amyloid domain, which can be released by a two-step proteolytic cleavage (4). The extracellular deposition and accumulation of the released Aβ fragments form the main components of amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease (4). APP can be phosphorylated at several sites, which may affect the proteolytic processing and secretion of this protein (5-8). Aβ-43 has been suggested as a biomarker in early onset of Alzheimer's disease, where patients have lower levels of Aβ-43 in cerebrospinal fluid (8-10). Several studies have shown that Aβ toxicity of Aβ-43 is as high as Aβ-42 or Aβ-40 in different models of Alzheimer's disease, including mouse models and human disease (10).

The RNAi Machinery Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means to analyze proteins associated with endogenous RNA interference. The kit contains enough primary and secondary antibodies to perform two western blot experiments.
The Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Antibody Sampler Kit provides the means to detect a broad range of common receptor tyrosine kinases, as well as total phospho-tyrosine activity. The kit provides enough antibody to perform two western blot experiments with each primary antibody.
The Translation Initiation Complex Antibody Sampler Kit contains reagents to investigate the initiation of translation within the cell. The kit contains enough primary and secondary antibodies to perform two Western blot experiments per primary antibody.
The Notch Receptor Interaction Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means to evaluate Notch signaling. The kit contains enough primary antibody to perform two western blots per primary.
The Inflammasome Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of detecting multiple inflammasome components. The kit contains enough primary antibodies to perform at least two western blot experiments.

Background: The innate immune system works as the first line of defense in protection from pathogenic microbes and host-derived signals of cellular distress. One way in which these “danger” signals trigger inflammation is through activation of inflammasomes, which are multiprotein complexes that assemble in the cytosol after exposure to pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) or danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) and result in the activation of caspase-1 and subsequent cleavage of proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-18 (Reviewed in 1-6). Inflammasome complexes typically consist of a cytosolic pattern recognition receptor (PRR; a nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich-repeat [NLR] or AIM2-like receptor [ALR] family member), an adaptor protein (ASC/TMS1), and pro-caspase-1. A number of distinct inflammasome complexes have been identified, each with a unique PRR and activation triggers. The best characterized is the NLRP3 complex, which contains NLRP3, ASC/TMS1, and pro-caspase-1. The NLRP3 inflammasome is activated in a two-step process. First, NF-κB signaling is induced through PAMP- or DAMP-mediated activation of TLR4 or TNFR, resulting in increased expression of NLRP3, pro-IL-1β, and pro-IL-18 (priming step, signal 1). Next, indirect activation of NLRP3 occurs by a multitude of signals (whole pathogens, PAMPs/DAMPs, potassium efflux, lysosomal-damaging environmental factors [uric acid, silica, alum] and endogenous factors [amyloid-β, cholesterol crystals], and mitochondrial damage), leading to complex assembly and activation of caspase-1 (signal 2). The complex inflammasome structure is built via domain interactions among the protein components. Other inflammasomes are activated by more direct means: double-stranded DNA activates the AIM2 complex, anthrax toxin activates NLRP1, and bacterial flagellin activates NLRC4. Activated caspase-1 induces secretion of proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β and -18, but also regulates metabolic enzyme expression, phagosome maturation, vasodilation, and pyroptosis, an inflammatory programmed cell death. Inflammasome signaling contributes to the onset of a number of diseases, including atherosclerosis, type II diabetes, Alzheimer’s disease, and autoimmune disorders.

The Human Reactive Inflammasome Antibody Sampler Kit II provides an economical means of detecting multiple inflammasome components. The kit contains enough primary antibodies to perform at least two western blot experiments.

Background: The innate immune system works as the first line of defense in protection from pathogenic microbes and host-derived signals of cellular distress. One way in which these “danger” signals trigger inflammation is through activation of inflammasomes, which are multiprotein complexes that assemble in the cytosol after exposure to pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) or danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) and result in the activation of caspase-1 and subsequent cleavage of proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-18 (Reviewed in 1-6). Inflammasome complexes typically consist of a cytosolic pattern recognition receptor (PRR; a nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich-repeat [NLR] or AIM2-like receptor [ALR] family member), an adaptor protein (ASC/TMS1), and pro-caspase-1. A number of distinct inflammasome complexes have been identified, each with a unique PRR and activation triggers. The best characterized is the NLRP3 complex, which contains NLRP3, ASC/TMS1, and pro-caspase-1. The NLRP3 inflammasome is activated in a two-step process. First, NF-κB signaling is induced through PAMP- or DAMP-mediated activation of TLR4 or TNFR, resulting in increased expression of NLRP3, pro-IL-1β, and pro-IL-18 (priming step, signal 1). Next, indirect activation of NLRP3 occurs by a multitude of signals (whole pathogens, PAMPs/DAMPs, potassium efflux, lysosomal-damaging environmental factors [uric acid, silica, alum] and endogenous factors [amyloid-β, cholesterol crystals], and mitochondrial damage), leading to complex assembly and activation of caspase-1 (signal 2). The complex inflammasome structure is built via domain interactions among the protein components. Other inflammasomes are activated by more direct means: double-stranded DNA activates the AIM2 complex, anthrax toxin activates NLRP1, and bacterial flagellin activates NLRC4. Activated caspase-1 induces secretion of proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β and -18, but also regulates metabolic enzyme expression, phagosome maturation, vasodilation, and pyroptosis, an inflammatory programmed cell death. Inflammasome signaling contributes to the onset of a number of diseases, including atherosclerosis, type II diabetes, Alzheimer’s disease, and autoimmune disorders.

The Mouse Reactive Inflammasome Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of detecting multiple inflammasome components. The kit includes enough antibodies to perform at least two western blot experiments with each primary antibody.

Background: The innate immune system works as the first line of defense in protection from pathogenic microbes and host-derived signals of cellular distress. One way in which these “danger” signals trigger inflammation is through activation of inflammasomes, which are multiprotein complexes that assemble in the cytosol after exposure to pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) or danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) and result in the activation of caspase-1 and subsequent cleavage of proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-18 (Reviewed in 1-6). Inflammasome complexes typically consist of a cytosolic pattern recognition receptor (PRR; a nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich-repeat [NLR] or AIM2-like receptor [ALR] family member), an adaptor protein (ASC/TMS1), and pro-caspase-1. A number of distinct inflammasome complexes have been identified, each with a unique PRR and activation triggers. The best characterized is the NLRP3 complex, which contains NLRP3, ASC/TMS1, and pro-caspase-1. The NLRP3 inflammasome is activated in a two-step process. First, NF-κB signaling is induced through PAMP- or DAMP-mediated activation of TLR4 or TNFR, resulting in increased expression of NLRP3, pro-IL-1β, and pro-IL-18 (priming step, signal 1). Next, indirect activation of NLRP3 occurs by a multitude of signals (whole pathogens, PAMPs/DAMPs, potassium efflux, lysosomal-damaging environmental factors [uric acid, silica, alum] and endogenous factors [amyloid-β, cholesterol crystals], and mitochondrial damage), leading to complex assembly and activation of caspase-1 (signal 2). The complex inflammasome structure is built via domain interactions among the protein components. Other inflammasomes are activated by more direct means: double-stranded DNA activates the AIM2 complex, anthrax toxin activates NLRP1, and bacterial flagellin activates NLRC4. Activated caspase-1 induces secretion of proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β and -18, but also regulates metabolic enzyme expression, phagosome maturation, vasodilation, and pyroptosis, an inflammatory programmed cell death. Inflammasome signaling contributes to the onset of a number of diseases, including atherosclerosis, type II diabetes, Alzheimer’s disease, and autoimmune disorders.

The Endosomal Marker Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of distinguishing endosomes in the early, late, and recycling phases. The kit includes enough antibody to perform two western blot experiments with each primary antibody.
The Matrix Remodeling Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of detecting different MMPs and TIMPs using the specific corresponding antibodies. The kit contains enough antibody to perform at least two western blot experiments with each primary antibody.

Background: Matrix remodeling is mainly controlled by MMPs and TIMPs. The matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family of proteases are a group of zinc-dependent enzymes that target extracellular proteins, including growth factors, cell surface receptors, adhesion molecules, matrix structural proteins, and other proteases (1, 2). Among the family members, MMP-2, MMP-3, MMP-7, MMP-9, and MMP14 (MT1-MMP) have been characterized as important factors for normal tissue remodeling during embryonic development, wound healing, tumor invasion, angiogenesis, carcinogenesis, and apoptosis (3). MMP activity is regulated by mechanisms of both transcriptional control and post translational protein processing. Once synthesized, MMPs exist as latent proenzymes. Maximum MMP activity requires proteolytic cleavage to generate active MMPs by releasing the inhibitory propeptide domain from the full-length protein (4). MMP activity can be inhibited through its binding to endogenously expressed TIMPs. TIMPs are members of the family of tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases that include TIMP1, TIMP2, TIMP3, and TIMP4. The main function of TIMPs is their inhibitory effect on MMPs. TIMPs irreversibly inactivate MMPs by direct binding MMPs and chelating their zinc cofactor at the catalytic site to inhibit the proteinase function (5,6).

The β-Amyloid Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of detecting APP and APP unmodified/modified fragments using total and fragment-specific antibodies. The kit includes enough antibody to perform two western blot experiments with each primary antibody.

Background: Amyloid β (Aβ) precursor protein (APP) is a 100-140 kDa transmembrane glycoprotein that exists as several isoforms (1). The amino acid sequence of APP contains an amyloid domain, which can be processed and released by two-step proteolytic cleavage (1). The extracellular deposition and accumulation of the released Aβ fragments form the main components of amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease (1). Several fragments corresponding to progressive APP processing at alternative cleavage sites have been identified (2). These include Aβ (1-37), Aβ (1-39), Aβ (1-40), and Aβ (1-42) (2). These fragments can also be N-terminally modified to generate pyroglutamate-3 Aβ (pE3-peptide) (3). Fragment-specific and pan-Aβ antibodies are used to detect and examine relative levels of individual Aβ fragments.

The Vesicle Trafficking Antibody Sampler kit provides an economical means to analyze proteins involved in the intracellular transport of cargo proteins. This kit includes enough primary and secondary antibody to perform two western blot experiments.
The Innate Immunity Activation Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of detecting the activation of multiple signaling pathways involved in innate immunity using phospho-specific, cleavage-specific, and control antibodies. The kit contains enough primary antibodies to perform at least two western blot experiments.

Background: The innate immune system responds rapidly to pathogens by detecting conserved pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and damage/danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) through pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). There are several families of PRRs. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are transmembrane PRRs and signal through recruitment of adaptor proteins, including MyD88, which leads to recruitment and phosphorylation of IRAK1 and IRAK4, followed by activation of NF-κB and MAP kinases (1-3). Some TLRs also activate IRFs, which upregulate the type I interferon response. Activation of TLR3 and TLR4 results in phosphorylation and activation of IRF-3, while TLR7, TLR8, and TLR9 lead to activation of IRF-7 (2, 3). STING is a multi-pass ER transmembrane protein that is activated in response to intracellular DNA downstream of DNA-sensing cytoplasmic PRRs, such as DDX41, or by binding the second messenger cyclic-GMP-AMP (cGAMP) produced by cGAS (4-6). Following activation, STING translocates with TBK1 to perinuclear endosomes, leading to phosphorylation and activation of IRF-3 and NF-κB (7, 8). Following activation and translocation, STING gets phosphorylated by ULK1, resulting in STING inactivation and degradation (9). Inflammasomes are cytoplasmic multimeric protein complexes that assemble in response to PAMPs or DAMPs detected by AIM2 or members of the nod-like receptor (NLR) family, such as NLRP3 (10). Inflammasomes activate Caspase-1, which cleaves the IL-1β and IL-18 precursor proteins into the mature forms (10).

The Senescence Marker Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of detecting multiple markers of cellular senescence. The kit includes enough antibody to perform two western blot experiments with each primary antibody.

Background: Senescence is characterized by stable stress-induced proliferative arrest and resistance to mitogenic stimuli, as well as the secretion of proteins such as cytokines, growth factors and proteases. These secreted proteins comprise the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP). Senescent cells are thought to accumulate as an organism ages, and contribute to age-related diseases, including cancer, through promotion of inflammation and disruption of normal cellular function (1,2).Because there is no single biomarker that can be used to definitively identify senescent cells, researchers must rely on a collection of biomarkers commonly associated with senescence. The Senescence Marker Antibody Sampler Kit provides a collection of antibodies to commonly used biomarkers of senescence-associated cell cycle arrest (p16 INK4A, p21 Waf1/Cip1), senescence-associated DNA damage (gamma-Histone H2A.X), and the SASP (HMGB1, IL-6, TNF-alpha, MMP3). The kit also includes an antibody to Lamin B1, which is frequently reduced in senescent cells.

The Pyroptosis Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of detecting proteins that are used as readouts for pyroptosis. The kit includes enough antibodies to perform two western blot experiments with each primary antibody.

Background: Pyroptosis is a regulated pathway of cell death with morphological features of necrosis, including cell swelling, plasma membrane pore formation, and engagement of an inflammatory response with the release of a number of damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) such as HMGB1 and inflammatory cytokines like IL-1β and IL-18 (1,2). Pyroptosis is generally induced in cells of the innate immune system, such as monocytes, marcrophages, and dendritic cells in the presence of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) expressed on microbial pathogens or by cell-derived DAMPs. It is induced through assembly of inflammasomes triggering proteolytic activation of caspase-1 which then cleaves inflammatory cytokines like IL-1β and IL-18 to their mature forms (3). A critical feature of pyroptosis is the cleavage of Gasdermin D by caspase-1 and mouse caspase-11 (or human caspase-4/5) (4-6). Upon cleavage the N-terminal fragment of Gasdermin D oligomerizes to form a pore allowing secretion of inflammatory DAMPs and cytokines. Canonical inflammasome assembly typically consists of a cytosolic-pattern recognition receptor (PPR; a nucleotide binding domain and leucine-rich repeat [NLR] or AIM2-like family members), an adaptor protein (ASC/TMS1), and pro-caspase-1. Distinct inflammasome complexes can recognize distinct PAMPs and DAMPs to trigger pyroptosis. The best characterized pathway triggered by the NLR, NLRP3, occurs through a two-step process. The first step is a priming signal, NF-κB is activated to induce the expression of a number of inflammasome components including NLRP3, pro-IL-1β, and pro-IL-18. In the second activation step, caspase-1 is activated and Gasdermin D and cytokines are proteolytically activated. In a non-canonical pathway, caspase-4 and caspase-5 can directly trigger Gasdermin D cleavage in monocytes following LPS stimulation (5,7).

StemLight™ Pluripotency Transcription Factor Antibody Kit contains a panel of antibodies for the detection of Oct-4, Nanog, and Sox2, key components of the core pluripotency transcription network in embryonic stem (ES) and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. The kit can be used to track the pluripotent potential of human ES or iPS cells. The loss of these markers indicates a loss of pluripotency or differentiation of the culture. The kit components are pre-optimized for parallel use in immunofluorescent analysis at a standard dilution, but components are also validated for use in other applications - please refer to individual datasheet information for application specific recommendations. Enough reagents are provided for 160 immunofluorescent assays based on a working volume of 100 μl.

Background: Pluripotency is the ability of a cell to differentiate into cell types of the three germ layers, the endoderm, ectoderm and mesoderm. It is a property shared by embryonic stem cells, embryonic carcinoma, and induced pluripotent cells.Oct-4, Sox2, and Nanog are key transcriptional regulators that are highly expressed in pluripotent cells (1). Together they form a transcriptional network that maintains cells in a pluripotent state (2,3). Over-expression of Oct-4 and Sox2, along with KLF4 and c-Myc can induce pluripotency in both mouse and human somatic cells, highlighting their roles as key regulators of the transcriptional network necessary for renewal and pluripotency (4-5). It has also been demonstrated that overexpression of Oct-4, Sox2, Nanog, and Lin28 can induce pluripotency in human somatic cells (6). Upon differentiation of pluripotent cultures, expression of Oct-4, Nanog, and Sox2 is downregulated.