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Monkey Retina Development in Camera-Type Eye

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Bax is a key component for cellular induced apoptosis through mitochondrial stress (1). Upon apoptotic stimulation, Bax forms oligomers and translocates from the cytosol to the mitochondrial membrane (2). Through interactions with pore proteins on the mitochondrial membrane, Bax increases the membrane's permeability, which leads to the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria, activation of caspase-9 and initiation of the caspase activation pathway for apoptosis (3,4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Bax is a key component for cellular induced apoptosis through mitochondrial stress (1). Upon apoptotic stimulation, Bax forms oligomers and translocates from the cytosol to the mitochondrial membrane (2). Through interactions with pore proteins on the mitochondrial membrane, Bax increases the membrane's permeability, which leads to the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria, activation of caspase-9 and initiation of the caspase activation pathway for apoptosis (3,4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Nonmuscle myosin is an actin-based motor protein essential to cell motility, cell division, migration, adhesion, and polarity. The holoenzyme consists of two identical heavy chains and two sets of light chains. The light chains (MLCs) regulate myosin II activity and stability. The heavy chains (NMHCs) are encoded by three genes, MYH9, MYH10, and MYH14, which generate three different nonmuscle myosin II isoforms, IIa, IIb, and IIc, respectively (reviewed in 1). While all three isoforms perform the same enzymatic tasks, binding to and contracting actin filaments coupled to ATP hydrolysis, their cellular functions do not appear to be redundant and they have different subcellular distributions (2-5). The carboxy-terminal tail domain of myosin II is important in isoform-specific subcellular localization (6). Research studies have shown that phosphorylation of myosin IIa at Ser1943 contributes to the regulation of breast cancer cell migration (7).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Nonmuscle myosin is an actin-based motor protein essential to cell motility, cell division, migration, adhesion, and polarity. The holoenzyme consists of two identical heavy chains and two sets of light chains. The light chains (MLCs) regulate myosin II activity and stability. The heavy chains (NMHCs) are encoded by three genes, MYH9, MYH10, and MYH14, which generate three different nonmuscle myosin II isoforms, IIa, IIb, and IIc, respectively (reviewed in 1). While all three isoforms perform the same enzymatic tasks, binding to and contracting actin filaments coupled to ATP hydrolysis, their cellular functions do not appear to be redundant and they have different subcellular distributions (2-5). The carboxy-terminal tail domain of myosin II is important in isoform-specific subcellular localization (6). Research studies have shown that phosphorylation of myosin IIa at Ser1943 contributes to the regulation of breast cancer cell migration (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Jumonji domain-containing protein 6 (JMJD6) is a bifunctional metalloenzyme belonging to the large family of JmjC domain-containing proteins. These proteins are ferrous iron- and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent enzymes (Fe2+/2OG) that catalyze hydroxylation and demethylation reactions on a wide variety of protein and nucleic acid substrates (1). JMJD6 is thought to act as both a lysyl-hydroxylase and an arginine demethylase, although the latter activity remains controversial. Specifically, JMJD6 has been shown to catalyze 5-hydroxylation of Lys15 and Lys276 residues on the protein U2AF2 / U2AF65 in vivo, affecting pre-mRNA splicing activity (2). It has also been reported that JMJD6 hydroxylates the Lys382 residue of p53, preventing acetylation and promoting association of p53 with MDMX, resulting in inhibition of p53 transcriptional activity (3). In addition to hydroxylase activity, JMJD6 also acts as an arginine demethylase by targeting histone H3 at Arg2 (H3R2me) and histone H4 at Arg3 (H4R3me). Unlike other members of the JmjC family, JMJD6 appears to have no lysine demethylase activity (4). Studies have shown that JMJD6 colocalizes with BRD4 at a subset of enhancers to demethylate H3R2me2 repressor marks (5). It has also been reported to demethylate non-histone substrates, such as estrogen receptor (ERα) (6), heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) (7), RNA helicase A (8), and the TRAF6 E3 ubiquitin ligase following activation of toll-like receptors (9).Although mutations in the sequence of JMJD6 have not been observed in cancer, its overexpression is identified in various cancers and is associated with aggressive disease progression and poor prognosis (10). This holds true for certain types of colon (3), lung (11), and breast cancers (12, 13). Based on these findings, JMJD6 has drawn interest as a potential therapeutic target and biomarker for certain cancer types.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Ribonucleotide reductase catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the synthesis of deoxynucleotide triphosphates (dNTPs). The regulatory M1 subunit (RRM1) is present throughout the cell division cycle, but downregulated in quiescent cells (1). Research studies have demonstrated that RRM1 is involved in carcinogenesis and tumor progression, and its expression is correlated with resistance to chemotherapy in non-small cell lung cancer (2-4).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Ribonucleotide reductase catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the synthesis of deoxynucleotide triphosphates (dNTPs). The regulatory M1 subunit (RRM1) is present throughout the cell division cycle, but downregulated in quiescent cells (1). Research studies have demonstrated that RRM1 is involved in carcinogenesis and tumor progression, and its expression is correlated with resistance to chemotherapy in non-small cell lung cancer (2-4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: LRP5 and LRP6 are single-pass transmembrane proteins belonging to the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR)-related protein family. Unlike other members of the LDLR family, LRP5 and LRP6 have four EGF and three LDLR repeats in the extracellular domain, and proline-rich motifs in the cytoplasmic domain (1). They function as co-receptors for Wnt and are required for the canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway (2,3). LRP5 and LRP6 are highly homologous and have redundant roles during development (4,5). The activity of LRP5 and LRP6 can be inhibited by the binding of some members of the Dickkopf (DKK) family of proteins (6,7). Upon stimulation with Wnt, LRP6 is phosphorylated at multiple sites including Thr1479, Ser1490, and Thr1493 by kinases such as GSK-3 and CK1 (8-10). Phosphorylated LRP6 recruits axin to the membrane and presumably activates β-catenin signaling (8-10).