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Monoclonal Antibody Flow Cytometry Enzyme Binding

$162
100 tests
500 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in human cells.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Cluster of Differentiation 4 (CD4) is a glycoprotein composed of an amino-terminal extracellular domain (four domains: D1-D4 with Ig-like structures), a transmembrane part and a short cytoplasmic tail. CD4 is expressed on the surface of T helper cells, regulatory T cells, monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells, and plays an important role in the development and activation of T cells. On T cells, CD4 is the co-receptor for the T cell receptor (TCR), and these two distinct structures recognize the Antigen–Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC). Specifically, the D1 domain of CD4 interacts with the β2-domain of the MHC class II molecule. CD4 ensures specificity of the TCR–antigen interaction, prolongs the contact between the T cell and the antigen presenting cell and recruits the tyrosine kinase Lck, which is essential for T cell activation (1).

$263
100 tests
500 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to violetFluor™ 450 and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Cluster of Differentiation 4 (CD4) is a glycoprotein composed of an amino-terminal extracellular domain (four domains: D1-D4 with Ig-like structures), a transmembrane part and a short cytoplasmic tail. CD4 is expressed on the surface of T helper cells, regulatory T cells, monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells, and plays an important role in the development and activation of T cells. On T cells, CD4 is the co-receptor for the T cell receptor (TCR), and these two distinct structures recognize the Antigen–Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC). Specifically, the D1 domain of CD4 interacts with the β2-domain of the MHC class II molecule. CD4 ensures specificity of the TCR–antigen interaction, prolongs the contact between the T cell and the antigen presenting cell and recruits the tyrosine kinase Lck, which is essential for T cell activation (1).

$263
100 tests
500 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to PerCP-Cy5.5® and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Cluster of Differentiation 4 (CD4) is a glycoprotein composed of an amino-terminal extracellular domain (four domains: D1-D4 with Ig-like structures), a transmembrane part and a short cytoplasmic tail. CD4 is expressed on the surface of T helper cells, regulatory T cells, monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells, and plays an important role in the development and activation of T cells. On T cells, CD4 is the co-receptor for the T cell receptor (TCR), and these two distinct structures recognize the Antigen–Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC). Specifically, the D1 domain of CD4 interacts with the β2-domain of the MHC class II molecule. CD4 ensures specificity of the TCR–antigen interaction, prolongs the contact between the T cell and the antigen presenting cell and recruits the tyrosine kinase Lck, which is essential for T cell activation (1).

$131
100 tests
500 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to FITC and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in human cells.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Cluster of Differentiation 4 (CD4) is a glycoprotein composed of an amino-terminal extracellular domain (four domains: D1-D4 with Ig-like structures), a transmembrane part and a short cytoplasmic tail. CD4 is expressed on the surface of T helper cells, regulatory T cells, monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells, and plays an important role in the development and activation of T cells. On T cells, CD4 is the co-receptor for the T cell receptor (TCR), and these two distinct structures recognize the Antigen–Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC). Specifically, the D1 domain of CD4 interacts with the β2-domain of the MHC class II molecule. CD4 ensures specificity of the TCR–antigen interaction, prolongs the contact between the T cell and the antigen presenting cell and recruits the tyrosine kinase Lck, which is essential for T cell activation (1).

$305
100 tests
500 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to PE-Cy7® and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Cluster of Differentiation 4 (CD4) is a glycoprotein composed of an amino-terminal extracellular domain (four domains: D1-D4 with Ig-like structures), a transmembrane part and a short cytoplasmic tail. CD4 is expressed on the surface of T helper cells, regulatory T cells, monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells, and plays an important role in the development and activation of T cells. On T cells, CD4 is the co-receptor for the T cell receptor (TCR), and these two distinct structures recognize the Antigen–Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC). Specifically, the D1 domain of CD4 interacts with the β2-domain of the MHC class II molecule. CD4 ensures specificity of the TCR–antigen interaction, prolongs the contact between the T cell and the antigen presenting cell and recruits the tyrosine kinase Lck, which is essential for T cell activation (1).

$193
100 tests
500 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to allophycocyanin (APC) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in human cells.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Cluster of Differentiation 4 (CD4) is a glycoprotein composed of an amino-terminal extracellular domain (four domains: D1-D4 with Ig-like structures), a transmembrane part and a short cytoplasmic tail. CD4 is expressed on the surface of T helper cells, regulatory T cells, monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells, and plays an important role in the development and activation of T cells. On T cells, CD4 is the co-receptor for the T cell receptor (TCR), and these two distinct structures recognize the Antigen–Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC). Specifically, the D1 domain of CD4 interacts with the β2-domain of the MHC class II molecule. CD4 ensures specificity of the TCR–antigen interaction, prolongs the contact between the T cell and the antigen presenting cell and recruits the tyrosine kinase Lck, which is essential for T cell activation (1).

$305
100 tests
500 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to APC-Cy7® and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in human cells.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Cluster of Differentiation 4 (CD4) is a glycoprotein composed of an amino-terminal extracellular domain (four domains: D1-D4 with Ig-like structures), a transmembrane part and a short cytoplasmic tail. CD4 is expressed on the surface of T helper cells, regulatory T cells, monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells, and plays an important role in the development and activation of T cells. On T cells, CD4 is the co-receptor for the T cell receptor (TCR), and these two distinct structures recognize the Antigen–Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC). Specifically, the D1 domain of CD4 interacts with the β2-domain of the MHC class II molecule. CD4 ensures specificity of the TCR–antigen interaction, prolongs the contact between the T cell and the antigen presenting cell and recruits the tyrosine kinase Lck, which is essential for T cell activation (1).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Notch1 (D6F11) XP® Rabbit mAb #4380.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Notch proteins (Notch1-4) are a family of transmembrane receptors that play important roles in development and the determination of cell fate (1). Mature Notch receptors are processed and assembled as heterodimeric proteins, with each dimer comprised of a large extracellular ligand-binding domain, a single-pass transmembrane domain, and a smaller cytoplasmic subunit (Notch intracellular domain, NICD) (2). Binding of Notch receptors to ligands of the Delta-Serrate-Lag2 (DSL) family triggers heterodimer dissociation, exposing the receptors to proteolytic cleavages; these result in release of the NICD, which translocates to the nucleus and activates transcription of downstream target genes (3,4).

$69
100 µg
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in mouse cells.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Cluster of Differentiation 4 (CD4) is a glycoprotein composed of an amino-terminal extracellular domain (four domains: D1-D4 with Ig-like structures), a transmembrane part and a short cytoplasmic tail. CD4 is expressed on the surface of T helper cells, regulatory T cells, monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells, and plays an important role in the development and activation of T cells. On T cells, CD4 is the co-receptor for the T cell receptor (TCR), and these two distinct structures recognize the Antigen–Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC). Specifically, the D1 domain of CD4 interacts with the β2-domain of the MHC class II molecule. CD4 ensures specificity of the TCR–antigen interaction, prolongs the contact between the T cell and the antigen presenting cell and recruits the tyrosine kinase Lck, which is essential for T cell activation (1).

$165
100 µg
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to allophycocyanin (APC) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in mouse cells.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Cluster of Differentiation 4 (CD4) is a glycoprotein composed of an amino-terminal extracellular domain (four domains: D1-D4 with Ig-like structures), a transmembrane part and a short cytoplasmic tail. CD4 is expressed on the surface of T helper cells, regulatory T cells, monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells, and plays an important role in the development and activation of T cells. On T cells, CD4 is the co-receptor for the T cell receptor (TCR), and these two distinct structures recognize the Antigen–Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC). Specifically, the D1 domain of CD4 interacts with the β2-domain of the MHC class II molecule. CD4 ensures specificity of the TCR–antigen interaction, prolongs the contact between the T cell and the antigen presenting cell and recruits the tyrosine kinase Lck, which is essential for T cell activation (1).

$59
100 µg
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to FITC and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in mouse cells.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Cluster of Differentiation 4 (CD4) is a glycoprotein composed of an amino-terminal extracellular domain (four domains: D1-D4 with Ig-like structures), a transmembrane part and a short cytoplasmic tail. CD4 is expressed on the surface of T helper cells, regulatory T cells, monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells, and plays an important role in the development and activation of T cells. On T cells, CD4 is the co-receptor for the T cell receptor (TCR), and these two distinct structures recognize the Antigen–Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC). Specifically, the D1 domain of CD4 interacts with the β2-domain of the MHC class II molecule. CD4 ensures specificity of the TCR–antigen interaction, prolongs the contact between the T cell and the antigen presenting cell and recruits the tyrosine kinase Lck, which is essential for T cell activation (1).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 647 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Galectin-9 (D9R4A) XP® Rabbit mAb #54330.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Galectins are a family of β-galactose binding proteins that are characterized by an affinity for poly-N-acetyllactosamine-enriched glycoconjugates and a carbohydrate-binding site (1,2). Members of the galectin family have been implicated in a variety of biological functions, including cell adhesion (3), growth regulation (4), cytokine production (5), T-cell apoptosis (6), and immune responses (7).Galectin-9 is induced by proinflammatory stimuli, including IFN-γ, TNF-α, and TLR ligands, and regulates various immune responses through interaction with its ligand TIM-3 (8, 9). Binding of galectin-9 to TIM-3 expressed by Th1 CD4 T cells resulted in T cell death (9). On the other hand, galectin-9 treatment of tumor-bearing mice increased the number of IFN-γ-producing TIM-3+ CD8 T cells and TIM-3+ dendritic cells (10). Transgenic overexpression of either TIM-3 or galectin-9 in mice led to an increase in cells with a myeloid-derived suppressor cell phenotype and inhibition of immune responses (11). CD44 is also proposed to be a receptor for galectin-9, and interaction of galectin-9 with CD44 expressed by induced regulatory T (iTreg) cells enhanced the stability of function of iTreg cells. In addition, galectin-9 was recently demonstrated to bind Dectin-1 expressed by pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma-infiltrating macrophages, resulting in tolerogenic macrophage reprogramming and suppression of anti-tumor immunity. Increased galectin-9 expression has been observed in several cancer types, including lung, liver, breast, and kidney (12). Alternative splicing of the galectin-9 transcript leads to several isoforms (13).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated PKCα (D7E6E) Rabbit mAb #59754.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) is one of the earliest events in a cascade that controls a variety of cellular responses, including secretion, gene expression, proliferation, and muscle contraction (1,2). PKC isoforms belong to three groups based on calcium dependency and activators. Classical PKCs are calcium-dependent via their C2 domains and are activated by phosphatidylserine (PS), diacylglycerol (DAG), and phorbol esters (TPA, PMA) through their cysteine-rich C1 domains. Both novel and atypical PKCs are calcium-independent, but only novel PKCs are activated by PS, DAG, and phorbol esters (3-5). Members of these three PKC groups contain a pseudo-substrate or autoinhibitory domain that binds to substrate-binding sites in the catalytic domain to prevent activation in the absence of cofactors or activators. Control of PKC activity is regulated through three distinct phosphorylation events. Phosphorylation occurs in vivo at Thr500 in the activation loop, at Thr641 through autophosphorylation, and at the carboxy-terminal hydrophobic site Ser660 (2). Atypical PKC isoforms lack hydrophobic region phosphorylation, which correlates with the presence of glutamic acid rather than the serine or threonine residues found in more typical PKC isoforms. The enzyme PDK1 or a close relative is responsible for PKC activation. A recent addition to the PKC superfamily is PKCμ (PKD), which is regulated by DAG and TPA through its C1 domain. PKD is distinguished by the presence of a PH domain and by its unique substrate recognition and Golgi localization (6). PKC-related kinases (PRK) lack the C1 domain and do not respond to DAG or phorbol esters. Phosphatidylinositol lipids activate PRKs, and small Rho-family GTPases bind to the homology region 1 (HR1) to regulate PRK kinase activity (7).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 488 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Galectin-9 (D9R4A) XP® Rabbit mAb #54330.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Galectins are a family of β-galactose binding proteins that are characterized by an affinity for poly-N-acetyllactosamine-enriched glycoconjugates and a carbohydrate-binding site (1,2). Members of the galectin family have been implicated in a variety of biological functions, including cell adhesion (3), growth regulation (4), cytokine production (5), T-cell apoptosis (6), and immune responses (7).Galectin-9 is induced by proinflammatory stimuli, including IFN-γ, TNF-α, and TLR ligands, and regulates various immune responses through interaction with its ligand TIM-3 (8, 9). Binding of galectin-9 to TIM-3 expressed by Th1 CD4 T cells resulted in T cell death (9). On the other hand, galectin-9 treatment of tumor-bearing mice increased the number of IFN-γ-producing TIM-3+ CD8 T cells and TIM-3+ dendritic cells (10). Transgenic overexpression of either TIM-3 or galectin-9 in mice led to an increase in cells with a myeloid-derived suppressor cell phenotype and inhibition of immune responses (11). CD44 is also proposed to be a receptor for galectin-9, and interaction of galectin-9 with CD44 expressed by induced regulatory T (iTreg) cells enhanced the stability of function of iTreg cells. In addition, galectin-9 was recently demonstrated to bind Dectin-1 expressed by pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma-infiltrating macrophages, resulting in tolerogenic macrophage reprogramming and suppression of anti-tumor immunity. Increased galectin-9 expression has been observed in several cancer types, including lung, liver, breast, and kidney (12). Alternative splicing of the galectin-9 transcript leads to several isoforms (13).

$199
100 µg
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to redFluor™ 710 and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in mouse cells.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Cluster of Differentiation 4 (CD4) is a glycoprotein composed of an amino-terminal extracellular domain (four domains: D1-D4 with Ig-like structures), a transmembrane part and a short cytoplasmic tail. CD4 is expressed on the surface of T helper cells, regulatory T cells, monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells, and plays an important role in the development and activation of T cells. On T cells, CD4 is the co-receptor for the T cell receptor (TCR), and these two distinct structures recognize the Antigen–Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC). Specifically, the D1 domain of CD4 interacts with the β2-domain of the MHC class II molecule. CD4 ensures specificity of the TCR–antigen interaction, prolongs the contact between the T cell and the antigen presenting cell and recruits the tyrosine kinase Lck, which is essential for T cell activation (1).

$169
100 µg
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to APC-Cy7® and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in mouse cells.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Cluster of Differentiation 4 (CD4) is a glycoprotein composed of an amino-terminal extracellular domain (four domains: D1-D4 with Ig-like structures), a transmembrane part and a short cytoplasmic tail. CD4 is expressed on the surface of T helper cells, regulatory T cells, monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells, and plays an important role in the development and activation of T cells. On T cells, CD4 is the co-receptor for the T cell receptor (TCR), and these two distinct structures recognize the Antigen–Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC). Specifically, the D1 domain of CD4 interacts with the β2-domain of the MHC class II molecule. CD4 ensures specificity of the TCR–antigen interaction, prolongs the contact between the T cell and the antigen presenting cell and recruits the tyrosine kinase Lck, which is essential for T cell activation (1).

$209
100 µg
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to PE-Cy7® and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in mouse cells.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Cluster of Differentiation 4 (CD4) is a glycoprotein composed of an amino-terminal extracellular domain (four domains: D1-D4 with Ig-like structures), a transmembrane part and a short cytoplasmic tail. CD4 is expressed on the surface of T helper cells, regulatory T cells, monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells, and plays an important role in the development and activation of T cells. On T cells, CD4 is the co-receptor for the T cell receptor (TCR), and these two distinct structures recognize the Antigen–Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC). Specifically, the D1 domain of CD4 interacts with the β2-domain of the MHC class II molecule. CD4 ensures specificity of the TCR–antigen interaction, prolongs the contact between the T cell and the antigen presenting cell and recruits the tyrosine kinase Lck, which is essential for T cell activation (1).

$239
100 µg
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to PerCP-Cy5.5® and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in mouse cells.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Cluster of Differentiation 4 (CD4) is a glycoprotein composed of an amino-terminal extracellular domain (four domains: D1-D4 with Ig-like structures), a transmembrane part and a short cytoplasmic tail. CD4 is expressed on the surface of T helper cells, regulatory T cells, monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells, and plays an important role in the development and activation of T cells. On T cells, CD4 is the co-receptor for the T cell receptor (TCR), and these two distinct structures recognize the Antigen–Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC). Specifically, the D1 domain of CD4 interacts with the β2-domain of the MHC class II molecule. CD4 ensures specificity of the TCR–antigen interaction, prolongs the contact between the T cell and the antigen presenting cell and recruits the tyrosine kinase Lck, which is essential for T cell activation (1).

$239
100 µg
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to violetFluor™ 450 and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in mouse cells.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Cluster of Differentiation 4 (CD4) is a glycoprotein composed of an amino-terminal extracellular domain (four domains: D1-D4 with Ig-like structures), a transmembrane part and a short cytoplasmic tail. CD4 is expressed on the surface of T helper cells, regulatory T cells, monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells, and plays an important role in the development and activation of T cells. On T cells, CD4 is the co-receptor for the T cell receptor (TCR), and these two distinct structures recognize the Antigen–Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC). Specifically, the D1 domain of CD4 interacts with the β2-domain of the MHC class II molecule. CD4 ensures specificity of the TCR–antigen interaction, prolongs the contact between the T cell and the antigen presenting cell and recruits the tyrosine kinase Lck, which is essential for T cell activation (1).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Pig, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The NF-κB/Rel transcription factors are present in the cytosol in an inactive state complexed with the inhibitory IκB proteins (1-3). Activation occurs via phosphorylation of IκBα at Ser32 and Ser36 followed by proteasome-mediated degradation that results in the release and nuclear translocation of active NF-κB (3-7). IκBα phosphorylation and resulting Rel-dependent transcription are activated by a highly diverse group of extracellular signals including inflammatory cytokines, growth factors, and chemokines. Kinases that phosphorylate IκB at these activating sites have been identified (8).