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Monoclonal Antibody Immunofluorescence Immunocytochemistry Dna Recombination

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The DNA mismatch repair system (MMR) repairs post-replication DNA, inhibits recombination between non-identical DNA sequences and induces both checkpoint and apoptotic responses following certain types of DNA damage (1). MSH2 (MutS homologue 2) forms the hMutS-α dimer with MSH6 and is an essential component of the mismatch repair process. hMutS-α is part of the BRCA1-associated surveillance complex (BASC), a complex that also contains BRCA1, MLH1, ATM, BLM, PMS2 proteins and the Rad50-Mre11-NBS1 complex (2).Mutations in MSH2 have been found in a large proportion of hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (Lynch Syndrome), the most common form of inherited colorectal cancer in the Western world (3). Mutations have also been associated with other sporadic tumors.

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The DNA mismatch repair system (MMR) repairs post-replication DNA, inhibits recombination between non-identical DNA sequences and induces both checkpoint and apoptotic responses following certain types of DNA damage (1). MSH2 (MutS homologue 2) forms the hMutS-α dimer with MSH6 and is an essential component of the mismatch repair process. hMutS-α is part of the BRCA1-associated surveillance complex (BASC), a complex that also contains BRCA1, MLH1, ATM, BLM, PMS2 proteins and the Rad50-Mre11-NBS1 complex (2).Mutations in MSH2 have been found in a large proportion of hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (Lynch Syndrome), the most common form of inherited colorectal cancer in the Western world (3). Mutations have also been associated with other sporadic tumors.

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: The DNA mismatch repair system (MMR) repairs post-replication DNA, inhibits recombination between nonidentical DNA sequences, and induces both checkpoint and apoptotic responses following certain types of DNA damage (1). MSH2 (MutS homologue 2) forms the hMutS-α dimer with MSH6 and is an essential component of the mismatch repair process. hMutS-α is part of the BRCA1-associated surveillance complex (BASC), a complex that also contains BRCA1, MLH1, ATM, BLM, PMS2 proteins, and the Rad50-Mre11-NBS1 complex (2). Mutations in MSH6 and other MMR proteins have been found in a large proportion of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (Lynch Syndrome), the most common form of inherited colorectal cancer in the Western world (3). Mutations in MSH6 have been shown to occur in glioblastoma in response to temozolomide therapy and to promote temozolomide resistance (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: RPA70 (HSSB, REPA1, RF-A, RP-A, p70) is a component of a heterotrimeric complex, composed of 70, 32/30 and 14 kDa subunits, collectively known as RPA. RPA is a single stranded DNA binding protein, whose DNA binding activity is believed to reside entirely in the 70 kDa subunit. The complex is required for almost all aspects of cellular DNA metabolism such as DNA replication (1-3), recombination, cell cycle and DNA damage checkpoints, and all major types of DNA repair including nucleotide excision, base excision, mismatch and double-strand break repairs (4-7). In response to genotoxic stress in eukaryotic cells, RPA has been shown to associate with the Rad9/Rad1/Hus1 (9-1-1) checkpoint complex (8). RPA is hyperphosphorylated upon DNA damage or replication stress by checkpoint kinases including ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), ATM and Rad3-related (ATR), and DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) (9-11). Phosphorylation of RPA32 occurs at serines 4, 8 and 33 (11). Hyperphosphorylation may alter RPA-DNA and RPA-protein interactions. In addition to the checkpoint partners, RPA interacts with a wide variety of protein partners, including proteins required for normal replication such as RCF, PCNA and Pol α, and also proteins involved in SV40 replication, such as DNA polymerase I and SV40 large T antigen (10,12).

$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: The DNA mismatch repair system (MMR) repairs post-replication DNA, inhibits recombination between nonidentical DNA sequences, and induces both checkpoint and apoptotic responses following certain types of DNA damage (1). MSH2 (MutS homologue 2) forms the hMutS-α dimer with MSH6 and is an essential component of the mismatch repair process. hMutS-α is part of the BRCA1-associated surveillance complex (BASC), a complex that also contains BRCA1, MLH1, ATM, BLM, PMS2 proteins, and the Rad50-Mre11-NBS1 complex (2). Mutations in MSH6 and other MMR proteins have been found in a large proportion of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (Lynch Syndrome), the most common form of inherited colorectal cancer in the Western world (3). Mutations in MSH6 have been shown to occur in glioblastoma in response to temozolomide therapy and to promote temozolomide resistance (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: The RecQ family is a group of DNA helicases that play an important role in global genomic stability (1). Mutations in three of the five known human RecQ proteins (BLM, WRN and RECQL4) give rise to clinically distinct disorders that are characterized by features such as premature aging and predisposition to cancer (2,3). The clinical distinction of each disease associated with these mutations points to distinct roles that members of this helicase family play in DNA metabolism. RecQL1 is the most abundant protein of the RecQ family and was the first family member to be discovered. No disease associations have been reported with RecQL1 and its biological activities are not well understood (4). It has recently been shown that depletion of RecQL1 negatively affects genomic maintenance and cellular proliferation – which may point to a role in DNA damage repair and cell cycle progression (5,6). Upregulation of RecQL1 along with other RecQ family members has been reported in cells in response to oncogenic viral infection (7).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Ku is a heterodimeric protein composed of two subunits (Ku70 and Ku80) originally identified by researchers as autoantigens associated with several autoimmune diseases including scleroderma, polymyositis, and systemic lupus erythematosus (1). Ku is an abundant, ubiquitously expressed nuclear protein that binds to and stabilizes the ends of DNA at telomeres or double-stranded DNA breaks (2-5). The Ku70/Ku80 heterodimer has ATP-dependent DNA helicase activity and functions as the DNA-binding regulatory component of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) (6-8). The assembly of the DNA-PK complex at DNA ends is required for nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ), one mechanism involved in double-stranded DNA break repair and V(D)J recombination (8). DNA-PK has been shown to phosphorylate many proteins, including p53, serum response factor, c-Jun, c-Fos, c-Myc, Oct-1, Sp-1, and RNA polymerase II (1,8). The combined activities of Ku70/Ku80 and DNA-PK implicate Ku in many cellular functions, including cell cycle regulation, DNA replication and repair, telomere maintenance, recombination, and transcriptional activation.

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: DNA damage, if not repaired, can lead to genome instability and tumorigenesis. Eukaryotic cells use multiple (sometimes overlapping) signaling pathways to respond to agents that cause various types of DNA lesions. Downstream molecules in DNA repair pathways converge on the sites of DNA damage, resulting in cell cycle arrest and repair or apoptosis (1). Rad18 is an E3 ubiquitin ligase recruited to sites of DNA damage. Along with the E2 ubiquitin ligase Rad6, Rad18 is responsible for monoubiquitination of DNA damage proteins including the replication clamp PCNA and the Fanconi anemia core protein FANCD2. Monoubiquitination of these proteins signals to downstream effector molecules and results in the repair of either post-replication repair lesions via the translesion synthesis (TLS) pathway or DNA double strand breaks via homologous recombination (2-4). Phospho-proteomic studies indicate that Ser403 of Rad18 may be phosphorylated by ATM/ATR in response to DNA damage-inducing agents (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: mRNA export is a process that is tightly coupled to mRNA splicing (1-4). Splicing and packaging of mRNAs in the form of an mRNA-protein complex (mRNP) leads to the recruitment of the mRNA export adaptor THOC4/ALY, via its interaction with the splicing factor UAP56, forming a large complex termed the transcription-export complex (TREX) (1,2,5). THOC4/ALY then directly interacts with NXF1/TAP, a part of the heterodimer that targets the mRNP to the nuclear pore complex, resulting in the shuttling of mRNP out of the nucleus and into the cytoplasm (1-3,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is an important factor in the repair of double-stranded breaks in DNA. Cells lacking DNA-PK or in which DNA-PK is inhibited fail to show proper nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) (1-7). DNA-PK is composed of two DNA-binding subunits (Ku70 and Ku86) and one 450 kDa catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) (8). It is thought that a heterodimer of Ku70 and Ku86 binds to double-stranded DNA broken ends before DNA-PKcs binds and is activated (1,9). Activated DNA-PKcs is a serine/threonine kinase that has been shown to phosphorylate a number of proteins in vitro, including p53, transcription factors, RNA polymerase, and Ku70/Ku86 (10,11). DNA-PKcs autophosphorylation at multiple sites, including Thr2609 and Ser2056, results in an inactivation of DNA-PK kinase activity and NHEJ ability (12,13). It has been demonstrated, however, that DNA-PK preferentially phosphorylates substrates before it autophosphorylates, suggesting that DNA-PK autophosphorylation may play a role in disassembly of the DNA repair machinery (14,15). Autophosphorylation at Thr2609 has also been shown to be required for DNA-PK-mediated double strand break repair, and phosphorylated DNA-PK co-localizes with H2A.X and 53BP1 at sites of DNA damage (16). Phosphorylation at Ser2056 occurs in response to double-stranded DNA breaks and ATM activation (17).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is an important factor in the repair of double-stranded breaks in DNA. Cells lacking DNA-PK or in which DNA-PK is inhibited fail to show proper nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) (1-7). DNA-PK is composed of two DNA-binding subunits (Ku70 and Ku86) and one 450 kDa catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) (8). It is thought that a heterodimer of Ku70 and Ku86 binds to double-stranded DNA broken ends before DNA-PKcs binds and is activated (1,9). Activated DNA-PKcs is a serine/threonine kinase that has been shown to phosphorylate a number of proteins in vitro, including p53, transcription factors, RNA polymerase, and Ku70/Ku86 (10,11). DNA-PKcs autophosphorylation at multiple sites, including Thr2609 and Ser2056, results in an inactivation of DNA-PK kinase activity and NHEJ ability (12,13). It has been demonstrated, however, that DNA-PK preferentially phosphorylates substrates before it autophosphorylates, suggesting that DNA-PK autophosphorylation may play a role in disassembly of the DNA repair machinery (14,15). Autophosphorylation at Thr2609 has also been shown to be required for DNA-PK-mediated double strand break repair, and phosphorylated DNA-PK co-localizes with H2A.X and 53BP1 at sites of DNA damage (16). Phosphorylation at Ser2056 occurs in response to double-stranded DNA breaks and ATM activation (17).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: RPA70 (HSSB, REPA1, RF-A, RP-A, p70) is a component of a heterotrimeric complex, composed of 70, 32/30 and 14 kDa subunits, collectively known as RPA. RPA is a single stranded DNA binding protein, whose DNA binding activity is believed to reside entirely in the 70 kDa subunit. The complex is required for almost all aspects of cellular DNA metabolism such as DNA replication (1-3), recombination, cell cycle and DNA damage checkpoints, and all major types of DNA repair including nucleotide excision, base excision, mismatch and double-strand break repairs (4-7). In response to genotoxic stress in eukaryotic cells, RPA has been shown to associate with the Rad9/Rad1/Hus1 (9-1-1) checkpoint complex (8). RPA is hyperphosphorylated upon DNA damage or replication stress by checkpoint kinases including ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), ATM and Rad3-related (ATR), and DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) (9-11). Phosphorylation of RPA32 occurs at serines 4, 8 and 33 (11). Hyperphosphorylation may alter RPA-DNA and RPA-protein interactions. In addition to the checkpoint partners, RPA interacts with a wide variety of protein partners, including proteins required for normal replication such as RCF, PCNA and Pol α, and also proteins involved in SV40 replication, such as DNA polymerase I and SV40 large T antigen (10,12).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Mismatch repair (MMR), a conserved process that involves correcting errors made during DNA synthesis, is crucial to the maintenance of genomic integrity. MLH1 is the human homologue of the E. coli MMR gene mutL. MMR requires recognition of a base mismatch or insertion/deletion loop by a MutS homolog followed by recruitment of a MutL heterodimeric complex consisting of MLH1 and PMS1 (MutL-γ), PMS2 (MutL-α) or MLH3 (MutL-γ). Other factors required for MMR in eukaryotes are EXO1, PCNA, RFC, RPA, DNA polymerases and DNA ligase (reviewed in 1). Inactivation of the MLH1 gene causes genome instability and predisposition to cancer (2-5). The MLH1 gene is frequently mutated in hereditary nonpolyposis colon cancer (HNPCC) (6). MLH1 also plays a role in meiotic recombination (7).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: RPA70 (HSSB, REPA1, RF-A, RP-A, p70) is a component of a heterotrimeric complex, composed of 70, 32/30 and 14 kDa subunits, collectively known as RPA. RPA is a single stranded DNA binding protein, whose DNA binding activity is believed to reside entirely in the 70 kDa subunit. The complex is required for almost all aspects of cellular DNA metabolism such as DNA replication (1-3), recombination, cell cycle and DNA damage checkpoints, and all major types of DNA repair including nucleotide excision, base excision, mismatch and double-strand break repairs (4-7). In response to genotoxic stress in eukaryotic cells, RPA has been shown to associate with the Rad9/Rad1/Hus1 (9-1-1) checkpoint complex (8). RPA is hyperphosphorylated upon DNA damage or replication stress by checkpoint kinases including ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), ATM and Rad3-related (ATR), and DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) (9-11). Phosphorylation of RPA32 occurs at serines 4, 8 and 33 (11). Hyperphosphorylation may alter RPA-DNA and RPA-protein interactions. In addition to the checkpoint partners, RPA interacts with a wide variety of protein partners, including proteins required for normal replication such as RCF, PCNA and Pol α, and also proteins involved in SV40 replication, such as DNA polymerase I and SV40 large T antigen (10,12).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: RPA70 (HSSB, REPA1, RF-A, RP-A, p70) is a component of a heterotrimeric complex, composed of 70, 32/30 and 14 kDa subunits, collectively known as RPA. RPA is a single stranded DNA binding protein, whose DNA binding activity is believed to reside entirely in the 70 kDa subunit. The complex is required for almost all aspects of cellular DNA metabolism such as DNA replication (1-3), recombination, cell cycle and DNA damage checkpoints, and all major types of DNA repair including nucleotide excision, base excision, mismatch and double-strand break repairs (4-7). In response to genotoxic stress in eukaryotic cells, RPA has been shown to associate with the Rad9/Rad1/Hus1 (9-1-1) checkpoint complex (8). RPA is hyperphosphorylated upon DNA damage or replication stress by checkpoint kinases including ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), ATM and Rad3-related (ATR), and DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) (9-11). Phosphorylation of RPA32 occurs at serines 4, 8 and 33 (11). Hyperphosphorylation may alter RPA-DNA and RPA-protein interactions. In addition to the checkpoint partners, RPA interacts with a wide variety of protein partners, including proteins required for normal replication such as RCF, PCNA and Pol α, and also proteins involved in SV40 replication, such as DNA polymerase I and SV40 large T antigen (10,12).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Pig, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is a member of the DNA sliding clamp family of proteins that assist in DNA replication (1). Crystal structure data suggests that a PCNA homotrimer ring can encircle and slide along the DNA double helix (2). Multiple proteins involved in DNA replication, DNA repair, and cell cycle control bind to PCNA rather than directly associating with DNA, thus facilitating fast processing of DNA (reviewed in 3). PCNA protein expression is a well-accepted marker of proliferation.

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 488 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric and immunofluorescent analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated PCNA (PC10) Mouse mAb #2586.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Pig, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is a member of the DNA sliding clamp family of proteins that assist in DNA replication (1). Crystal structure data suggests that a PCNA homotrimer ring can encircle and slide along the DNA double helix (2). Multiple proteins involved in DNA replication, DNA repair, and cell cycle control bind to PCNA rather than directly associating with DNA, thus facilitating fast processing of DNA (reviewed in 3). PCNA protein expression is a well-accepted marker of proliferation.

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Histone H2A.X is a variant histone that represents approximately 10% of the total H2A histone proteins in normal human fibroblasts (1). H2A.X is required for checkpoint-mediated cell cycle arrest and DNA repair following double-stranded DNA breaks (1). DNA damage, caused by ionizing radiation, UV-light, or radiomimetic agents, results in rapid phosphorylation of H2A.X at Ser139 by PI3K-like kinases, including ATM, ATR, and DNA-PK (2,3). Within minutes following DNA damage, H2A.X is phosphorylated at Ser139 at sites of DNA damage (4). This very early event in the DNA-damage response is required for recruitment of a multitude of DNA-damage response proteins, including MDC1, NBS1, RAD50, MRE11, 53BP1, and BRCA1 (1). In addition to its role in DNA-damage repair, H2A.X is required for DNA fragmentation during apoptosis and is phosphorylated by various kinases in response to apoptotic signals. H2A.X is phosphorylated at Ser139 by DNA-PK in response to cell death receptor activation, c-Jun N-terminal Kinase (JNK1) in response to UV-A irradiation, and p38 MAPK in response to serum starvation (5-8). H2A.X is constitutively phosphorylated on Tyr142 in undamaged cells by WSTF (Williams-Beuren syndrome transcription factor) (9,10). Upon DNA damage, and concurrent with phosphorylation of Ser139, Tyr142 is dephosphorylated at sites of DNA damage by recruited EYA1 and EYA3 phosphatases (9). While phosphorylation at Ser139 facilitates the recruitment of DNA repair proteins and apoptotic proteins to sites of DNA damage, phosphorylation at Tyr142 appears to determine which set of proteins are recruited. Phosphorylation of H2A.X at Tyr142 inhibits the recruitment of DNA repair proteins and promotes binding of pro-apoptotic factors such as JNK1 (9). Mouse embryonic fibroblasts expressing only mutant H2A.X Y142F, which favors recruitment of DNA repair proteins over apoptotic proteins, show a reduced apoptotic response to ionizing radiation (9). Thus, it appears that the balance of H2A.X Tyr142 phosphorylation and dephosphorylation provides a switch mechanism to determine cell fate after DNA damage.

$129
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is a member of the DNA sliding clamp family of proteins that assist in DNA replication (1). Crystal structure data suggests that a PCNA homotrimer ring can encircle and slide along the DNA double helix (2). Multiple proteins involved in DNA replication, DNA repair, and cell cycle control bind to PCNA rather than directly associating with DNA, thus facilitating fast processing of DNA (reviewed in 3). PCNA protein expression is a well-accepted marker of proliferation.

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 647 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated PCNA (D3H8P) XP® Rabbit mAb #13110.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is a member of the DNA sliding clamp family of proteins that assist in DNA replication (1). Crystal structure data suggests that a PCNA homotrimer ring can encircle and slide along the DNA double helix (2). Multiple proteins involved in DNA replication, DNA repair, and cell cycle control bind to PCNA rather than directly associating with DNA, thus facilitating fast processing of DNA (reviewed in 3). PCNA protein expression is a well-accepted marker of proliferation.

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Confocal immunofluorescent analysis of mouse small intestine using Olfm4 (D6Y5A) XP® Rabbit mAb (Mouse Specific) #39141 (yellow). After blocking free secondary antibody binding sites with Rabbit (DA1E) mAb IgG XP® Isotype Control #3900, the tissue was then labeled using PCNA (D3H8P) XP® Rabbit mAb (Alexa Fluor® 647 Conjugate) (magenta) and Non-phospho (Active) β-Catenin (Ser45) (D2U8Y) XP® Rabbit mAb (Alexa Fluor® 488 Conjugate) #70034 (cyan). Nuclei are stained with DAPI #4083 (gray). Transverse small intestine was tiled at 20X (left) to demonstrate that PCNA is found in profliferating crypt cells (right).
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