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Monoclonal Antibody Immunofluorescence Immunocytochemistry Response to Hormone Stimulus

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: There are three members of the steroid receptor co-activator (SRC) family of proteins: SRC-1 (NCoA-1), SRC-2 (TIF2/GRIP1/NCoA-2), and SRC-3 (ACTR/pCIP/RAC3/TRAM-1/AIB1). All SRC family members share significant structural homology and function to stimulate transcription mediated by nuclear hormone receptors and other transcriptional activators such as Stat3, NF-κB, E2F1, and p53 (1-4). Two SRC proteins, SRC-1 and SRC-3, function as histone acetyltransferases (5,6). In addition, all three family members can recruit other histone acetyltransferases (CBP/p300, PCAF) and histone methyltransferases (PRMT1, CARM1) to target promoters and cooperate to enhance expression of many genes (5-8). The SRC proteins play important roles in multiple physiological processes including cell proliferation, cell survival, somatic cell growth, mammary gland development, female reproductive function, and vasoprotection (9). SRC-1 and SRC-3 are conduits for kinase-mediated growth factor signaling to the estrogen receptor and other transcriptional activators. Seven SRC-1 phosphorylation sites and six SRC-3 phosphorylation sites have been identified, which are induced by steroids, cytokines, and growth factors and involve multiple kinase signaling pathways (9-11). Research has shown that all three SRC family members are associated with increased activity of nuclear receptors in breast, prostate, and ovarian carcinomas. According to the literature, SRC-3 is frequently amplified or overexpressed in a number of cancers (12), and SRC-1/PAX3 and SRC-2/MYST3 translocations are found associated with rhabdomyosarcoma and acute myeloid leukemia, respectively (13,14).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: There are three members of the steroid receptor co-activator (SRC) family of proteins: SRC-1 (NCoA-1), SRC-2 (TIF2/GRIP1/NCoA-2), and SRC-3 (ACTR/pCIP/RAC3/TRAM-1/AIB1). All SRC family members share significant structural homology and function to stimulate transcription mediated by nuclear hormone receptors and other transcriptional activators such as Stat3, NF-κB, E2F1, and p53 (1-4). Two SRC proteins, SRC-1 and SRC-3, function as histone acetyltransferases (5,6). In addition, all three family members can recruit other histone acetyltransferases (CBP/p300, PCAF) and histone methyltransferases (PRMT1, CARM1) to target promoters and cooperate to enhance expression of many genes (5-8). The SRC proteins play important roles in multiple physiological processes including cell proliferation, cell survival, somatic cell growth, mammary gland development, female reproductive function, and vasoprotection (9). SRC-1 and SRC-3 are conduits for kinase-mediated growth factor signaling to the estrogen receptor and other transcriptional activators. Seven SRC-1 phosphorylation sites and six SRC-3 phosphorylation sites have been identified, which are induced by steroids, cytokines, and growth factors and involve multiple kinase signaling pathways (9-11). Research has shown that all three SRC family members are associated with increased activity of nuclear receptors in breast, prostate, and ovarian carcinomas. According to the literature, SRC-3 is frequently amplified or overexpressed in a number of cancers (12), and SRC-1/PAX3 and SRC-2/MYST3 translocations are found associated with rhabdomyosarcoma and acute myeloid leukemia, respectively (13,14).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey, Pig

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: JunD, along with closely related family members c-Jun and JunB, is a transcription factor that can activate or repress a wide array of target genes (1,2). JunD transcriptional activity is modulated by phosphorylation in response to cellular stress via the c-Jun N-terminal Kinase (JNK)/Stress-Activated Protein Kinase (SAPK) family of protein kinases (3,4). JunD activity can also be modulated by the MAPK pathway in response to growth factors. Its transcriptional capacity is further regulated by other binding partners that affect JunD expression levels and DNA binding capacity (reviewed in 5). All Jun proteins are capable of forming dimers with Fos-, ATF- and CREB-family transcription factors to form the AP-1 complex that differentially regulates a variety of target genes involved in cellular growth, proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis (reviewed in 5 and 6). Unlike JunB and c-Jun, which share a high degree of homology (>95%), JunD is less conserved (~75%) at the amino acid level (1). Growing evidence suggests that JunD protein expression is regulated independently of other family members (reviewed in 5). It is thought that JunD may have functional significance beyond the typical Jun-family milieu. This is exemplified by the fact that JunD knockout mice are viable, bearing specific defects in cardiomyocyte function and bone growth, whereas their c-Jun counterparts develop significant, multi-organ defects during embryogenesis and die at E12.5 (7-10). JunD appears to specifically regulate genes involved in antioxidant response and hydrogen peroxide production and plays an important role in angiogenesis via its ability to exert transcriptional control over the VEGF gene (11). Furthermore, JunD appears to play an important roll in metabolism via modulation of IGF-I signaling pathways (12). Recent studies have shown that JunD regulates GADD45 α and γ expression in prostate cancer cells and that inhibition of JunD promotes apoptosis. Thus, JunD may be a viable therapeutic target for the treatment of prostate cancer (13).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: The Fos family of nuclear oncogenes includes c-Fos, FosB, Fos-related antigen 1 (FRA1), and Fos-related antigen 2 (FRA2) (1). While most Fos proteins exist as a single isoform, the FosB protein exists as two isoforms: full-length FosB and a shorter form, FosB2 (Delta FosB), which lacks the carboxy-terminal 101 amino acids (1-3). The expression of Fos proteins is rapidly and transiently induced by a variety of extracellular stimuli including growth factors, cytokines, neurotransmitters, polypeptide hormones, and stress. Fos proteins dimerize with Jun proteins (c-Jun, JunB, and JunD) to form Activator Protein-1 (AP-1), a transcription factor that binds to TRE/AP-1 elements and activates transcription. Fos and Jun proteins contain the leucine-zipper motif that mediates dimerization and an adjacent basic domain that binds to DNA. The various Fos/Jun heterodimers differ in their ability to transactivate AP-1 dependent genes. In addition to increased expression, phosphorylation of Fos proteins by Erk kinases in response to extracellular stimuli may further increase transcriptional activity (4-6). Phosphorylation of c-Fos at Ser32 and Thr232 by Erk5 increases protein stability and nuclear localization (5). Phosphorylation of FRA1 at Ser252 and Ser265 by Erk1/2 increases protein stability and leads to overexpression of FRA1 in cancer cells (6). Following growth factor stimulation, expression of FosB and c-Fos in quiescent fibroblasts is immediate, but very short-lived, with protein levels dissipating after several hours (7). FRA1 and FRA2 expression persists longer, and appreciable levels can be detected in asynchronously growing cells (8). Deregulated expression of c-Fos, FosB, or FRA2 can result in neoplastic cellular transformation; however, Delta FosB lacks the ability to transform cells (2,3).

$307
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Stat3 transcription factor is an important signaling molecule for many cytokines and growth factor receptors (1) and is required for murine fetal development (2). Research studies have shown that Stat3 is constitutively activated in a number of human tumors (3,4) and possesses oncogenic potential (5) and anti-apoptotic activities (3). Stat3 is activated by phosphorylation at Tyr705, which induces dimerization, nuclear translocation, and DNA binding (6,7). Transcriptional activation seems to be regulated by phosphorylation at Ser727 through the MAPK or mTOR pathways (8,9). Stat3 isoform expression appears to reflect biological function as the relative expression levels of Stat3α (86 kDa) and Stat3β (79 kDa) depend on cell type, ligand exposure, or cell maturation stage (10). It is notable that Stat3β lacks the serine phosphorylation site within the carboxy-terminal transcriptional activation domain (8).

$134
20 µl
$336
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Fos family of nuclear oncogenes includes c-Fos, FosB, Fos-related antigen 1 (FRA1), and Fos-related antigen 2 (FRA2) (1). While most Fos proteins exist as a single isoform, the FosB protein exists as two isoforms: full-length FosB and a shorter form, FosB2 (Delta FosB), which lacks the carboxy-terminal 101 amino acids (1-3). The expression of Fos proteins is rapidly and transiently induced by a variety of extracellular stimuli including growth factors, cytokines, neurotransmitters, polypeptide hormones, and stress. Fos proteins dimerize with Jun proteins (c-Jun, JunB, and JunD) to form Activator Protein-1 (AP-1), a transcription factor that binds to TRE/AP-1 elements and activates transcription. Fos and Jun proteins contain the leucine-zipper motif that mediates dimerization and an adjacent basic domain that binds to DNA. The various Fos/Jun heterodimers differ in their ability to transactivate AP-1 dependent genes. In addition to increased expression, phosphorylation of Fos proteins by Erk kinases in response to extracellular stimuli may further increase transcriptional activity (4-6). Phosphorylation of c-Fos at Ser32 and Thr232 by Erk5 increases protein stability and nuclear localization (5). Phosphorylation of FRA1 at Ser252 and Ser265 by Erk1/2 increases protein stability and leads to overexpression of FRA1 in cancer cells (6). Following growth factor stimulation, expression of FosB and c-Fos in quiescent fibroblasts is immediate, but very short-lived, with protein levels dissipating after several hours (7). FRA1 and FRA2 expression persists longer, and appreciable levels can be detected in asynchronously growing cells (8). Deregulated expression of c-Fos, FosB, or FRA2 can result in neoplastic cellular transformation; however, Delta FosB lacks the ability to transform cells (2,3).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Stat3 transcription factor is an important signaling molecule for many cytokines and growth factor receptors (1) and is required for murine fetal development (2). Research studies have shown that Stat3 is constitutively activated in a number of human tumors (3,4) and possesses oncogenic potential (5) and anti-apoptotic activities (3). Stat3 is activated by phosphorylation at Tyr705, which induces dimerization, nuclear translocation, and DNA binding (6,7). Transcriptional activation seems to be regulated by phosphorylation at Ser727 through the MAPK or mTOR pathways (8,9). Stat3 isoform expression appears to reflect biological function as the relative expression levels of Stat3α (86 kDa) and Stat3β (79 kDa) depend on cell type, ligand exposure, or cell maturation stage (10). It is notable that Stat3β lacks the serine phosphorylation site within the carboxy-terminal transcriptional activation domain (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: IRAP (also known as LNPEP) was originally described as an insulin-responsive aminopeptidase found in Glut4-containing vesicles (1). It is essentially always in the same compartments as Glut4 and has identical insulin-stimulated translocation patterns as Glut4 (2). IRAP is therefore considered to be a surrogate marker for Glut4 (2). IRAP was later found to be a critical enzyme that regulates the expression and activity of several essential hormones and regulatory proteins, including the Glut4 transporter (3,4). This membrane associated, zinc-dependent cystinyl aminopeptidase acts as both a receptor for angiotensin IV as well as the enzyme that catalyzes the synthesis of this essential hormone from its angiotensinogen precursor (5). IRAP catalyzes the hydrolysis of several peptide hormones, including oxytocin and vasopressin (4). Abnormal IRAP expression or activity is associated with several forms of cancer in humans, including renal and endometrial cancers (6,7).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) is an aggressive brainstem astrocyte tumor arising mostly in children, leading to a long-term survival rate of less than 10%. Multiple whole-genome sequencing studies of DIPG patients identified commonly occurring mutations in the H3F3A gene encoding histone H3.3. One of these mutations, a lysine to methionine amino acid substitution (K27M), is found in up to 78% of DIPGs and 22% of non-brainstem pediatric gliomas (1-3). This mutation is associated with poor prognosis, with a mean survival time of 0.73 years for patients with the K27M mutation versus 4.6 years for patients without the mutation (1-3). Expression of the K27M mutant histone H3 is accompanied by a dramatic reduction in the levels of polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2)-mediated trimethylation of histone H3, changes in the distribution of PRC2 on the genome, and altered expression of genes associated with various cancer pathways (4-6).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Fos family of nuclear oncogenes includes c-Fos, FosB, Fos-related antigen 1 (FRA1), and Fos-related antigen 2 (FRA2) (1). While most Fos proteins exist as a single isoform, the FosB protein exists as two isoforms: full-length FosB and a shorter form, FosB2 (Delta FosB), which lacks the carboxy-terminal 101 amino acids (1-3). The expression of Fos proteins is rapidly and transiently induced by a variety of extracellular stimuli including growth factors, cytokines, neurotransmitters, polypeptide hormones, and stress. Fos proteins dimerize with Jun proteins (c-Jun, JunB, and JunD) to form Activator Protein-1 (AP-1), a transcription factor that binds to TRE/AP-1 elements and activates transcription. Fos and Jun proteins contain the leucine-zipper motif that mediates dimerization and an adjacent basic domain that binds to DNA. The various Fos/Jun heterodimers differ in their ability to transactivate AP-1 dependent genes. In addition to increased expression, phosphorylation of Fos proteins by Erk kinases in response to extracellular stimuli may further increase transcriptional activity (4-6). Phosphorylation of c-Fos at Ser32 and Thr232 by Erk5 increases protein stability and nuclear localization (5). Phosphorylation of FRA1 at Ser252 and Ser265 by Erk1/2 increases protein stability and leads to overexpression of FRA1 in cancer cells (6). Following growth factor stimulation, expression of FosB and c-Fos in quiescent fibroblasts is immediate, but very short-lived, with protein levels dissipating after several hours (7). FRA1 and FRA2 expression persists longer, and appreciable levels can be detected in asynchronously growing cells (8). Deregulated expression of c-Fos, FosB, or FRA2 can result in neoplastic cellular transformation; however, Delta FosB lacks the ability to transform cells (2,3).

$134
20 µl
$336
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Pig, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: c-Jun is a member of the Jun family containing c-Jun, JunB, and JunD, and is a component of the transcription factor activator protein-1 (AP-1). AP-1 is composed of dimers of Fos, Jun, and ATF family members and binds to and activates transcription at TRE/AP-1 elements (reviewed in 1). Extracellular signals including growth factors, chemokines, and stress activate AP-1-dependent transcription. The transcriptional activity of c-Jun is regulated by phosphorylation at Ser63 and Ser73 through SAPK/JNK (reviewed in 2). Knock-out studies in mice have shown that c-Jun is essential for embryogenesis (3), and subsequent studies have demonstrated roles for c-Jun in various tissues and developmental processes including axon regeneration (4), liver regeneration (5), and T cell development (6). AP-1 regulated genes exert diverse biological functions including cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis, as well as transformation, invasion and metastasis, depending on cell type and context (7-9). Other target genes regulate survival, as well as hypoxia and angiogenesis (8,10). Research studies have implicated c-Jun as a promising therapeutic target for cancer, vascular remodeling, acute inflammation, and rheumatoid arthritis (11,12).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: JunB is a basic region, leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factor belonging to the Jun family that includes c-Jun and JunD. Jun family members homodimerize or heterodimerize with Fos and ATF proteins to form a functional transcription factor AP-1 (activator protein 1), whose activity is regulated by a variety of physiological and pathological stimuli such as growth factors, infections, and stress signals (1-4). While JunB sometimes antagonizes c-Jun transcriptional activity, it may functionally substitute for c-Jun during development in mice (5-7). JunB regulates hematopoietic stem cell number and plays an important role in the pathogenesis of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) (8,9).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Stat3 transcription factor is an important signaling molecule for many cytokines and growth factor receptors (1) and is required for murine fetal development (2). Research studies have shown that Stat3 is constitutively activated in a number of human tumors (3,4) and possesses oncogenic potential (5) and anti-apoptotic activities (3). Stat3 is activated by phosphorylation at Tyr705, which induces dimerization, nuclear translocation, and DNA binding (6,7). Transcriptional activation seems to be regulated by phosphorylation at Ser727 through the MAPK or mTOR pathways (8,9). Stat3 isoform expression appears to reflect biological function as the relative expression levels of Stat3α (86 kDa) and Stat3β (79 kDa) depend on cell type, ligand exposure, or cell maturation stage (10). It is notable that Stat3β lacks the serine phosphorylation site within the carboxy-terminal transcriptional activation domain (8).

$134
20 µl
$336
100 µl
$792
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Stat3 transcription factor is an important signaling molecule for many cytokines and growth factor receptors (1) and is required for murine fetal development (2). Research studies have shown that Stat3 is constitutively activated in a number of human tumors (3,4) and possesses oncogenic potential (5) and anti-apoptotic activities (3). Stat3 is activated by phosphorylation at Tyr705, which induces dimerization, nuclear translocation, and DNA binding (6,7). Transcriptional activation seems to be regulated by phosphorylation at Ser727 through the MAPK or mTOR pathways (8,9). Stat3 isoform expression appears to reflect biological function as the relative expression levels of Stat3α (86 kDa) and Stat3β (79 kDa) depend on cell type, ligand exposure, or cell maturation stage (10). It is notable that Stat3β lacks the serine phosphorylation site within the carboxy-terminal transcriptional activation domain (8).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
$630
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: c-Jun is a member of the Jun family containing c-Jun, JunB, and JunD, and is a component of the transcription factor activator protein-1 (AP-1). AP-1 is composed of dimers of Fos, Jun, and ATF family members and binds to and activates transcription at TRE/AP-1 elements (reviewed in 1). Extracellular signals including growth factors, chemokines, and stress activate AP-1-dependent transcription. The transcriptional activity of c-Jun is regulated by phosphorylation at Ser63 and Ser73 through SAPK/JNK (reviewed in 2). Knock-out studies in mice have shown that c-Jun is essential for embryogenesis (3), and subsequent studies have demonstrated roles for c-Jun in various tissues and developmental processes including axon regeneration (4), liver regeneration (5), and T cell development (6). AP-1 regulated genes exert diverse biological functions including cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis, as well as transformation, invasion and metastasis, depending on cell type and context (7-9). Other target genes regulate survival, as well as hypoxia and angiogenesis (8,10). Research studies have implicated c-Jun as a promising therapeutic target for cancer, vascular remodeling, acute inflammation, and rheumatoid arthritis (11,12).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Stat5 is activated in response to a wide variety of ligands including IL-2, GM-CSF, growth hormone and prolactin. Phosphorylation at Tyr694 is obligatory for Stat5 activation (1,2). This phosphorylation is mediated by Src upon erythropoietin stimulation (3). Stat5 is constitutively active in some leukemic cell types (4). Phosphorylated Stat5 is found in some endothelial cells treated with IL-3, which suggests its involvement in angiogenesis and cell motility (5). Stat5a and Stat5b are independently regulated and activated in various cell types. For instance, interferon treatment predominantly activates Stat5a in U-937 cells and Stat5b in HeLa cells (6).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Stat3 transcription factor is an important signaling molecule for many cytokines and growth factor receptors (1) and is required for murine fetal development (2). Research studies have shown that Stat3 is constitutively activated in a number of human tumors (3,4) and possesses oncogenic potential (5) and anti-apoptotic activities (3). Stat3 is activated by phosphorylation at Tyr705, which induces dimerization, nuclear translocation, and DNA binding (6,7). Transcriptional activation seems to be regulated by phosphorylation at Ser727 through the MAPK or mTOR pathways (8,9). Stat3 isoform expression appears to reflect biological function as the relative expression levels of Stat3α (86 kDa) and Stat3β (79 kDa) depend on cell type, ligand exposure, or cell maturation stage (10). It is notable that Stat3β lacks the serine phosphorylation site within the carboxy-terminal transcriptional activation domain (8).

$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: HS1 (HCLS1, LckBP1, p75) is a protein kinase substrate that is expressed only in tissues and cells of hematopoietic origin (1,2). HS1 contains four cortactin repeats and a single SH3 domain (2). This intracellular protein is phosphorylated following immune receptor activation, which promotes recruitment of HS1 to the immune synapse (3-5). Phosphorylation of HS1 is required to regulate actin dynamics and provide docking sites for many other signaling molecules, such as Vav1 and PLCγ1 (6). HS1 also plays an important role in platelet activation (7).

$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: HS1 (HCLS1, LckBP1, p75) is a protein kinase substrate that is expressed only in tissues and cells of hematopoietic origin (1,2). HS1 contains four cortactin repeats and a single SH3 domain (2). This intracellular protein is phosphorylated following immune receptor activation, which promotes recruitment of HS1 to the immune synapse (3-5). Phosphorylation of HS1 is required to regulate actin dynamics and provide docking sites for many other signaling molecules, such as Vav1 and PLCγ1 (6). HS1 also plays an important role in platelet activation (7).

$134
20 µl
$336
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Stat5 is activated in response to a wide variety of ligands including IL-2, GM-CSF, growth hormone and prolactin. Phosphorylation at Tyr694 is obligatory for Stat5 activation (1,2). This phosphorylation is mediated by Src upon erythropoietin stimulation (3). Stat5 is constitutively active in some leukemic cell types (4). Phosphorylated Stat5 is found in some endothelial cells treated with IL-3, which suggests its involvement in angiogenesis and cell motility (5). Stat5a and Stat5b are independently regulated and activated in various cell types. For instance, interferon treatment predominantly activates Stat5a in U-937 cells and Stat5b in HeLa cells (6).