Microsize antibodies for $99 | Learn More >>

Monoclonal Antibody Immunohistochemistry Paraffin Lacrimal Gland Development

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Paired box (PAX) proteins are a family of transcription factors that play important and diverse roles in animal development (1). Nine PAX proteins (PAX1-9) have been described in humans and other mammals. They are defined by the presence of an amino-terminal "paired" domain, consisting of two helix-turn-helix motifs, with DNA binding activity (2). PAX proteins are classified into four structurally distinct subgroups (I-IV) based on the absence or presence of a carboxy-terminal homeodomain and a central octapeptide region. Subgroup I (PAX1 and 9) contains the octapeptide but lacks the homeodomain; subgroup II (PAX2, 5, and 8) contains the octapeptide and a truncated homeodomain; subgroup III (PAX3 and 7) contains the octapeptide and a complete homeodomain; and subgroup IV (PAX4 and 6) contains a complete homeodomain but lacks the octapeptide region (2). PAX proteins play critically important roles in development by regulating transcriptional networks responsible for embryonic patterning and organogenesis (3); a subset of PAX proteins also maintain functional importance during postnatal development (4). Research studies have implicated genetic mutations that result in aberrant expression of PAX genes in a number of cancer subtypes (1-3), with members of subgroups II and III identified as potential mediators of tumor progression (2).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) produce mitogenic and angiogenic effects in target cells by signaling through cell surface receptor tyrosine kinases. There are four members of the FGF receptor family: FGFR1 (flg), FGFR2 (bek, KGFR), FGFR3, and FGFR4. Each receptor contains an extracellular ligand binding domain, a transmembrane domain, and a cytoplasmic kinase domain (1). Following ligand binding and dimerization, the receptors are phosphorylated at specific tyrosine residues (2). Seven tyrosine residues in the cytoplasmic tail of FGFR1 can be phosphorylated: Tyr463, 583, 585, 653, 654, 730, and 766. Tyr653 and Tyr654 are important for catalytic activity of activated FGFR and are essential for signaling (3). The other phosphorylated tyrosine residues may provide docking sites for downstream signaling components such as Crk and PLCγ (4,5).