Microsize antibodies for $99 | Learn More >>

Monoclonal Antibody Immunoprecipitation Protein Complex Assembly

$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Chromatin assembly factor 1 (CAF-1) is a histone H3/H4 chaperone complex that functions in de novo assembly of nucleosomes during DNA replication and nucleotide excision repair (1). Nucleosome assembly is a two-step process, involving initial deposition of a histone H3/H4 tetramer onto DNA, followed by the deposition of a pair of histone H2A/H2B dimers (1). CAF-1 interacts with PCNA and localizes to DNA replication and DNA repair foci, where it functions to assemble newly synthesized histone H3/H4 tetramers onto replicating DNA (2-6). Assembly of histone H2A/H2B dimers requires additional assembly factors. The CAF-1 complex consists of three proteins: CHAF1A (p150), CHAF1B (p60) and RBAP48 (p48 or RBBP4). CHAF1A and CHAF1B proteins are specific for the CAF-1 complex, while RBAP48 is a component of multiple chromatin modifying complexes (1). CHAF1A and CHAF1B expression levels correlate with cellular proliferation and both proteins are significantly down-regulated in quiescent cells (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Protein tyrosine kinase Pyk2, also called CAKβ, RAFTK and CADTK, is a nonreceptor tyrosine kinase structurally related to focal adhesion kinase (FAK) (1-4). Pyk2 is predominantly expressed in cells derived from hematopoietic lineages and in the central nervous system. Pyk2 is one of the signaling mediators for the G-protein-coupled receptors and MAP kinase signaling pathway. It plays an important role in cell spreading and migration (5-7).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: When T cells encounter antigens via the T cell receptor (TCR), information about the quantity and quality of antigens is relayed to the intracellular signal transduction machinery (1). This activation process depends mainly on CD3 (Cluster of Differentiation 3), a multiunit protein complex that directly associates with the TCR. CD3 is composed of four polypeptides: ζ, γ, ε and δ. Each of these polypeptides contains at least one immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) (2). Engagement of TCR complex with foreign antigens induces tyrosine phosphorylation in the ITAM motifs and phosphorylated ITAMs function as docking sites for signaling molecules such as ZAP-70 and p85 subunit of PI-3 kinase (3,4). TCR ligation also induces a conformational change in CD3ε, such that a proline region is exposed and then associates with the adaptor protein Nck (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) was initially identified as an enzyme that regulates glycogen synthesis in response to insulin (1). GSK-3 is a ubiquitously expressed serine/threonine protein kinase that phosphorylates and inactivates glycogen synthase. GSK-3 is a critical downstream element of the PI3K/Akt cell survival pathway whose activity can be inhibited by Akt-mediated phosphorylation at Ser21 of GSK-3α and Ser9 of GSK-3β (2,3). GSK-3 has been implicated in the regulation of cell fate in Dictyostelium and is a component of the Wnt signaling pathway required for Drosophila, Xenopus, and mammalian development (4). GSK-3 has been shown to regulate cyclin D1 proteolysis and subcellular localization (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Leupaxin is a member of the paxillin family of scaffold proteins whose functions include regulation of cell adhesion, migration and metastasis (1). Leupaxin suppresses integrin-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation of paxillin and affects the regulation of cell-matrix adhesion (2). Researchers have implicated leupaxin in the progression of human hepatocellular carcinoma through its regulation of beta-catenin-mediated transcription (3). Researchers have also shown that leupaxin regulates actin dynamics and migration of prostate cancer cells through its interaction with caldesmon (4) and down-regulation of p120-catenin (5). Studies in breast cancer implicate leupaxin in the regulation of ER-alpha transcription and invasiveness (6).

$129
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: When T cells encounter antigens via the T cell receptor (TCR), information about the quantity and quality of antigens is relayed to the intracellular signal transduction machinery (1). This activation process depends mainly on CD3 (Cluster of Differentiation 3), a multiunit protein complex that directly associates with the TCR. CD3 is composed of four polypeptides: ζ, γ, ε and δ. Each of these polypeptides contains at least one immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) (2). Engagement of TCR complex with foreign antigens induces tyrosine phosphorylation in the ITAM motifs and phosphorylated ITAMs function as docking sites for signaling molecules such as ZAP-70 and p85 subunit of PI-3 kinase (3,4). TCR ligation also induces a conformational change in CD3ε, such that a proline region is exposed and then associates with the adaptor protein Nck (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Axin1 (Axis inhibition protein 1) and Axin2 are multidomain scaffold proteins that negatively regulate Wnt signaling. Axin1 interacts with APC, GSK-3β, Dvl, and β-catenin and promotes the GSK-3β-mediated phosphorylation and subsequent degradation of β-catenin (1,2). Upon stimulation of cells with Wnt, Axin1 is recruited to the membrane by phosphorylated LRP5/6, a process that is believed to be crucial for activation of Wnt signaling (3,4). In addition to its role in the Wnt signaling pathway, Axin1 forms a complex with MEKK1 and activates c-Jun amino-terminal kinase (JNK/SAPK) (5). Axin2 (also known as Conductin or Axil) can functionally substitute for Axin1 in mice (6). Axin2 itself is a direct target of the Wnt signaling pathway and therefore serves to control the duration and/or intensity of Wnt signaling through a negative feedback loop (7-9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: CBP (CREB-binding protein) and p300 are highly conserved and functionally related transcriptional co-activators that associate with transcriptional regulators and signaling molecules, integrating multiple signal transduction pathways with the transcriptional machinery (1,2). CBP/p300 also contain histone acetyltransferase (HAT) activity, allowing them to acetylate histones and other proteins (2). Phosphorylation of p300 at Ser89 by PKC represses its transciptional acitivity, and phosphorylation at the same site by AMPK disrupts the association of p300 with nuclear receptors (3,4). Ser1834 phosphorylation of p300 by Akt disrupts its association with C/EBPβ (5). Growth factors induce phosphorylation of CBP at Ser437, which is required for CBP recruitment to the transcription complex (6). CaM kinase IV phosphorylates CBP at Ser302, which is required for CBP-dependent transcriptional activation in the CNS (7). The role of acetylation of CBP/p300 is of particular interest (2,8). Acetylation of p300 at Lys1499 has been demonstrated to enhance its HAT activity and affect a wide variety of signaling events (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: CBP (CREB-binding protein) and p300 are highly conserved and functionally related transcriptional co-activators that associate with transcriptional regulators and signaling molecules, integrating multiple signal transduction pathways with the transcriptional machinery (1,2). CBP/p300 also contain histone acetyltransferase (HAT) activity, allowing them to acetylate histones and other proteins (2). Phosphorylation of p300 at Ser89 by PKC represses its transciptional acitivity, and phosphorylation at the same site by AMPK disrupts the association of p300 with nuclear receptors (3,4). Ser1834 phosphorylation of p300 by Akt disrupts its association with C/EBPβ (5). Growth factors induce phosphorylation of CBP at Ser437, which is required for CBP recruitment to the transcription complex (6). CaM kinase IV phosphorylates CBP at Ser302, which is required for CBP-dependent transcriptional activation in the CNS (7). The role of acetylation of CBP/p300 is of particular interest (2,8). Acetylation of p300 at Lys1499 has been demonstrated to enhance its HAT activity and affect a wide variety of signaling events (9).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Members of the Smad family of signal transduction molecules are components of a critical intracellular pathway that transmit TGF-β signals from the cell surface into the nucleus. Three distinct classes of Smads have been defined: the receptor-regulated Smads (R-Smads), which include Smad1, 2, 3, 5, and 8; the common-mediator Smad (co-Smad), Smad4; and the antagonistic or inhibitory Smads (I-Smads), Smad6 and 7 (1-5). Activated type I receptors associate with specific R-Smads and phosphorylate them on a conserved carboxy terminal SSXS motif. The phosphorylated R-Smad dissociates from the receptor and forms a heteromeric complex with the co-Smad (Smad4), allowing translocation of the complex to the nucleus. Once in the nucleus, Smads can target a variety of DNA binding proteins to regulate transcriptional responses (6-8).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Members of the Smad family of signal transduction molecules are components of a critical intracellular pathway that transmit TGF-β signals from the cell surface into the nucleus. Three distinct classes of Smads have been defined: the receptor-regulated Smads (R-Smads), which include Smad1, 2, 3, 5, and 8; the common-mediator Smad (co-Smad), Smad4; and the antagonistic or inhibitory Smads (I-Smads), Smad6 and 7 (1-5). Activated type I receptors associate with specific R-Smads and phosphorylate them on a conserved carboxy terminal SSXS motif. The phosphorylated R-Smad dissociates from the receptor and forms a heteromeric complex with the co-Smad (Smad4), allowing translocation of the complex to the nucleus. Once in the nucleus, Smads can target a variety of DNA binding proteins to regulate transcriptional responses (6-8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Glucose transporter 1 (Glut1, SLC2A1) is a widely expressed transport protein that displays a broad range of substrate specificity in transporting a number of different aldose sugars as well as an oxidized form of vitamin C into cells (1,2). Glut1 is responsible for the basal-level uptake of glucose from the blood through facilitated diffusion (2). Research studies show that Glut1 and the transcription factor HIF-1α mediate the regulation of glycolysis by O-GlcNAcylation in cancer cells (3). Additional studies demonstrate that Glut1 is required for CD4 T cell activation and is critical for the expansion and survival of T effector (Teff) cells (4). Mutations in the corresponding SLC2A1 gene cause GLUT1 deficiency syndromes (GLUT1DS1, GLUT1DS2), a pair of neurologic disorders characterized by delayed development, seizures, spasticity, paroxysmal exercise-induced dyskinesia, and acquired microcephaly (5,6). Two other neurologic disorders - dystonia-9 (DYT9) and susceptibility to idiopathic generalized epilepsy 12 (EIG12) - are also caused by mutations in the SLC2A1 gene (7,8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Ajuba belongs to the Zyxin/Ajuba family, members of which include LIMD1, LPP, Trip6 and Zyxin. Three LIM domains at the carboxy-terminus characterize this family of proteins. Zyxin/Ajuba family members associate with the actin cytoskeleton, are components of both cell-cell junction adhesive complex and integrin-mediated adhesive complex, and shuttle in and out of the nucleus (1). Ajuba is involved in Rac activation during cell migration and activates Aurora A in order to commit to mitosis (2-3). Ajuba and its family members also have an amino-terminal proline-rich pre-LIM region, and Ajuba augments ERK activation in a Ras-dependent manner (4).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Members of the Smad family of signal transduction molecules are components of a critical intracellular pathway that transmits TGF-β signals from the cell surface into the nucleus. Three distinct classes of Smads have been defined: the recepter-regulated Smads (R-Smads), which include Smad1, 2, 3, 5, 8; the common-mediator Smad (co-Smad), Smad4; and the antagonistic or inhibitory Smads (I-Smads), Smad6 and 7 (1-5). Briefly, activated type I receptors associate with specific R-Smads and phosphorylate them on a conserved SSXS motif at the carboxy-terminus of the proteins. The phosphorylated R-Smad dissociates from the receptor and forms a heteromeric complex with the co-Smad, Smad4, and together the complex moves to the nucleus. Once in the nucleus, Smads can target a variety of DNA binding proteins to regulate transcriptional responses (6-8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Interleukin-2 (IL-2) is a T cell stimulatory cytokine best known for inducing T cell proliferation and NK cell proliferation and activation (1,2). IL-2 also promotes peripheral development of regulatory T cells (Tregs) (3,4). Conversely, IL-2 is involved in the activation-induced cell death (AICD) that is observed post T cell expansion by increasing levels of Fas on CD4+ T cells (5). The effects of IL-2 are mediated through a trimeric receptor complex consisting of IL-2Rα, IL-2Rβ, and the common gamma chain, γc (1,2). IL-2Rα binds exclusively to IL-2 with low affinity and increases the binding affinity of the whole receptor complex including IL-2Rβ and γc subunits. IL-15 also binds to IL-2Rβ (1,2). γc is used by other cytokines including IL-4, IL-7, IL-9, IL-15, and IL-21 (1,2). Binding of IL-2 initiates signaling cascades involving Jak1, Jak3, Stat5, and the PI3K/Akt pathways (1,2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Dickkopf (DKK) family proteins consist of four members DKK1, DKK2, DKK3 and DKK4 that function as secreted Wnt antagonists by inhibiting Wnt coreceptors LRP5 and LRP6 (1,2). DKKs contain two cysteine-rich domains in which the positions of 10 cysteine residues are well conserved (3). Their expression is both temporally and spatially regulated during animal development (4). DKKs also bind with high affinity to transmembrane proteins Kremen1 and 2, which themselves also modulate Wnt signaling (5,6).

$129
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The initiation of DNA replication in mammalian cells is a highly coordinated process that ensures duplication of the genome only once per cell division cycle. Origins of replication are dispersed throughout the genome and their activities are regulated via the sequential binding of pre-replication and replication factors. The origin recognition complex (ORC) is thought to be bound to chromatin throughout the cell cycle (1,2). The pre-replication complex (pre-RC) forms in late mitosis/early G1 phase beginning with the binding of CDT1 and cdc6 to the origin, which allows binding of the heterohexameric MCM2-7 complex. Once this complex is formed, the origin is “licensed” for initiation of DNA replication. In order to ensure that replication occurs only once per cell cycle, geminin binds to and inhibits CDT1 during the S, G2 and M phases. This prevents the recruitment of the MCM complex to the origins of replication, which blocks the premature reformation of the Pre-RC. At the metaphase/anaphase transition, geminin is degraded by the anaphase-promoting complex (APC) allowing for the formation of new pre-RC (3,4).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Axin1 (Axis inhibition protein 1) and Axin2 are multidomain scaffold proteins that negatively regulate Wnt signaling. Axin1 interacts with APC, GSK-3β, Dvl, and β-catenin and promotes the GSK-3β-mediated phosphorylation and subsequent degradation of β-catenin (1,2). Upon stimulation of cells with Wnt, Axin1 is recruited to the membrane by phosphorylated LRP5/6, a process that is believed to be crucial for activation of Wnt signaling (3,4). In addition to its role in the Wnt signaling pathway, Axin1 forms a complex with MEKK1 and activates c-Jun amino-terminal kinase (JNK/SAPK) (5). Axin2 (also known as Conductin or Axil) can functionally substitute for Axin1 in mice (6). Axin2 itself is a direct target of the Wnt signaling pathway and therefore serves to control the duration and/or intensity of Wnt signaling through a negative feedback loop (7-9).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The p53 tumor suppressor protein plays a major role in cellular response to DNA damage and other genomic aberrations. Activation of p53 can lead to either cell cycle arrest and DNA repair or apoptosis (1). p53 is phosphorylated at multiple sites in vivo and by several different protein kinases in vitro (2,3). DNA damage induces phosphorylation of p53 at Ser15 and Ser20 and leads to a reduced interaction between p53 and its negative regulator, the oncoprotein MDM2 (4). MDM2 inhibits p53 accumulation by targeting it for ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation (5,6). p53 can be phosphorylated by ATM, ATR, and DNA-PK at Ser15 and Ser37. Phosphorylation impairs the ability of MDM2 to bind p53, promoting both the accumulation and activation of p53 in response to DNA damage (4,7). Chk2 and Chk1 can phosphorylate p53 at Ser20, enhancing its tetramerization, stability, and activity (8,9). p53 is phosphorylated at Ser392 in vivo (10,11) and by CAK in vitro (11). Phosphorylation of p53 at Ser392 is increased in human tumors (12) and has been reported to influence the growth suppressor function, DNA binding, and transcriptional activation of p53 (10,13,14). p53 is phosphorylated at Ser6 and Ser9 by CK1δ and CK1ε both in vitro and in vivo (13,15). Phosphorylation of p53 at Ser46 regulates the ability of p53 to induce apoptosis (16). Acetylation of p53 is mediated by p300 and CBP acetyltransferases. Inhibition of deacetylation suppressing MDM2 from recruiting HDAC1 complex by p19 (ARF) stabilizes p53. Acetylation appears to play a positive role in the accumulation of p53 protein in stress response (17). Following DNA damage, human p53 becomes acetylated at Lys382 (Lys379 in mouse) in vivo to enhance p53-DNA binding (18). Deacetylation of p53 occurs through interaction with the SIRT1 protein, a deacetylase that may be involved in cellular aging and the DNA damage response (19).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome proteins (WASPs) mediate actin dynamics by activating the Arp2/3 actin nucleation complex in response to activated Rho family GTPases. In mammals, five WASP family members have been described. Hematopoietic WASP and ubiquitously expressed N-WASP are autoinhibited in unstimulated cells. Upon stimulation they are activated by cdc42, which relieves the autoinhibition in conjunction with phosphatidyl inositol 4,5-bisphosphate. Three WAVE (Wasf, SCAR) family proteins are similar in sequence to WASP and N-WASP but lack the WASP/N-WASP autoinhibition domains and are indirectly activated by Rac (reviewed in 1). Both WASP and WAVE functions appear to be essential, as knockout of either N-WASP or Scar-2 in mice results in cardiac and neuronal defects and embryonic lethality (2,3). Loss of WASP results in immune system defects and fewer immune cells (4). WAVE-2 (WASF2) is widely distributed, while WAVE-1 and WAVE-3 are strongly expressed in brain (5). WAVE-3 may act as a tumor suppressor in neuroblastoma, a childhood disease of the sympathetic nervous system (6). Increased expression of WAVE-3 is seen in breast cancer, and studies in breast adenocarcinoma cells indicate that WAVE-3 regulates breast cancer progression, invasion and metastasis through the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway (7,8).