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Monoclonal Antibody Mitochondrial Membrane

$305
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to biotin under optimal conditions. The biotinylated antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated LRRK2 (D18E12) Rabbit mAb #13046.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Parkinson’s disease (PD), the second most common neurodegenerative disease after Alzheimer’s, is a progressive movement disorder characterized by rigidity, tremors, and postural instability. The pathological hallmarks of PD are progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra of the ventral midbrain and the presence of intracellular Lewy bodies (protein aggregates of α-synuclein, ubiquitin, and other components) in surviving neurons of the brain stem (1). Research studies have shown various genes and loci are genetically linked to PD including α-synuclein/PARK1 and 4, parkin/PARK2, UCH-L1/PARK5, PINK1/PARK6, DJ-1/PARK7, LRRK2/PARK8, synphilin-1, and NR4A2 (2).Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) contains amino-terminal leucine-rich repeats (LRR), a Ras-like small GTP binding protein-like (ROC) domain, an MLK protein kinase domain, and a carboxy-terminal WD40 repeat domain. Research studies have linked at least 20 LRRK2 mutations to PD, with the G2019S mutation being the most prevalent (3). The G2019S mutation causes increased LRRK2 kinase activity, which induces a progressive reduction in neurite length that leads to progressive neurite loss and decreased neuronal survival (4). Researchers are currently testing the MLK inhibitor CEP-1347 in PD clinical trials, indicating the potential value of LRRK2 as a therapeutic target for treatment of PD (5).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated MAVS (D5A9E) Rabbit mAb #24930.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: The mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS, VISA) contributes to innate immunity by triggering IRF-3 and NF-κB activation in response to viral infection, leading to the production of IFN-β (1). The MAVS protein contains an N-terminal CARD domain and a C-terminal mitochondrial transmembrane domain. The MAVS adaptor protein plays a critical and specific role in viral defenses (2). MAVS acts downstream of the RIG-I RNA helicase and viral RNA sensor, leading to the recruitment of IKKε, TRIF and TRAF6 (3,4). Some viruses have evolved strategies to circumvent these innate defenses by using proteases that cleave MAVS to prevent its mitochondrial localization (5,6).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) is one of the earliest events in a cascade that controls a variety of cellular responses, including secretion, gene expression, proliferation, and muscle contraction (1,2). PKC isoforms belong to three groups based on calcium dependency and activators. Classical PKCs are calcium-dependent via their C2 domains and are activated by phosphatidylserine (PS), diacylglycerol (DAG), and phorbol esters (TPA, PMA) through their cysteine-rich C1 domains. Both novel and atypical PKCs are calcium-independent, but only novel PKCs are activated by PS, DAG, and phorbol esters (3-5). Members of these three PKC groups contain a pseudo-substrate or autoinhibitory domain that binds to substrate-binding sites in the catalytic domain to prevent activation in the absence of cofactors or activators. Control of PKC activity is regulated through three distinct phosphorylation events. Phosphorylation occurs in vivo at Thr500 in the activation loop, at Thr641 through autophosphorylation, and at the carboxy-terminal hydrophobic site Ser660 (2). Atypical PKC isoforms lack hydrophobic region phosphorylation, which correlates with the presence of glutamic acid rather than the serine or threonine residues found in more typical PKC isoforms. The enzyme PDK1 or a close relative is responsible for PKC activation. A recent addition to the PKC superfamily is PKCμ (PKD), which is regulated by DAG and TPA through its C1 domain. PKD is distinguished by the presence of a PH domain and by its unique substrate recognition and Golgi localization (6). PKC-related kinases (PRK) lack the C1 domain and do not respond to DAG or phorbol esters. Phosphatidylinositol lipids activate PRKs, and small Rho-family GTPases bind to the homology region 1 (HR1) to regulate PRK kinase activity (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: High temperature requirement protein A2 (HtrA2)/Omi is a serine protease with homology to the E. coli HtrA protein (DegP) and is thought to be involved in apoptosis and stress-induced degradation of misfolded proteins (1). While HtrA2 was orignally identified to be present in either the nucleus (1) or endoplasmic reticulum (2), subsequent studies have shown that it localizes in mitochondria and is released during apoptosis (3-8). HtrA2 is produced as a 50 kDa zymogen that is cleaved to generate a 36 kDa mature protein that exposes an amino terminal motif (AVPS) resembling that of the IAP inhibitor Smac/Diablo (3-8). Like Smac, interaction between HtrA2 and IAP family members, such as XIAP, antagonizes their inhibition of caspase activity and protection from apoptosis (3-8). Interestingly, HtrA2 knock-out mice did not show signs of reduced apoptosis, but rather had a loss of neurons in the striatum and a Parkinson's-like phenotype, suggesting that HtrA2 might have a neuroprotective function (9-11). This activity is associated with the protease activity of HtrA2 (9). Furthermore, research studies have shown that loss of function mutations in the HtrA2 gene are associated with Parkinson's disease (12).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Bax is a key component for cellular induced apoptosis through mitochondrial stress (1). Upon apoptotic stimulation, Bax forms oligomers and translocates from the cytosol to the mitochondrial membrane (2). Through interactions with pore proteins on the mitochondrial membrane, Bax increases the membrane's permeability, which leads to the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria, activation of caspase-9 and initiation of the caspase activation pathway for apoptosis (3,4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) is one of the earliest events in a cascade that controls a variety of cellular responses, including secretion, gene expression, proliferation, and muscle contraction (1,2). PKC isoforms belong to three groups based on calcium dependency and activators. Classical PKCs are calcium-dependent via their C2 domains and are activated by phosphatidylserine (PS), diacylglycerol (DAG), and phorbol esters (TPA, PMA) through their cysteine-rich C1 domains. Both novel and atypical PKCs are calcium-independent, but only novel PKCs are activated by PS, DAG, and phorbol esters (3-5). Members of these three PKC groups contain a pseudo-substrate or autoinhibitory domain that binds to substrate-binding sites in the catalytic domain to prevent activation in the absence of cofactors or activators. Control of PKC activity is regulated through three distinct phosphorylation events. Phosphorylation occurs in vivo at Thr500 in the activation loop, at Thr641 through autophosphorylation, and at the carboxy-terminal hydrophobic site Ser660 (2). Atypical PKC isoforms lack hydrophobic region phosphorylation, which correlates with the presence of glutamic acid rather than the serine or threonine residues found in more typical PKC isoforms. The enzyme PDK1 or a close relative is responsible for PKC activation. A recent addition to the PKC superfamily is PKCμ (PKD), which is regulated by DAG and TPA through its C1 domain. PKD is distinguished by the presence of a PH domain and by its unique substrate recognition and Golgi localization (6). PKC-related kinases (PRK) lack the C1 domain and do not respond to DAG or phorbol esters. Phosphatidylinositol lipids activate PRKs, and small Rho-family GTPases bind to the homology region 1 (HR1) to regulate PRK kinase activity (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Mitochondria continuously divide and fuse. This dynamic process is highly regulated in response to various physiological cues (1,2). The GTPase OPA1 mediates the fusion of the mitochondrial inner membrane. Constitutive proteolytic processes mediated by OMA1 (S1 site) and YME1L (S2 site) convert long isoforms (L-OPA1) into short isforms (S-OPA1). The balance between L-OPA1 and S-OPA1 is required to maintain a normal morphology of mitochondria (3,4).OMA1 is synthesized as a precursor and processed into a mature form (5,6). OMA1 is constitutively active and cleaves L-OPA1 at the S1 site. However, various stress stimuli can further activate OMA1 and result in the rapid and complete conversion of L-OPA1 into S-OPA1, which inhibits fusion and causes mitochondrial fragmentation (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS, VISA) contributes to innate immunity by triggering IRF-3 and NF-κB activation in response to viral infection, leading to the production of IFN-β (1). The MAVS protein contains an N-terminal CARD domain and a C-terminal mitochondrial transmembrane domain. The MAVS adaptor protein plays a critical and specific role in viral defenses (2). MAVS acts downstream of the RIG-I RNA helicase and viral RNA sensor, leading to the recruitment of IKKε, TRIF and TRAF6 (3,4). Some viruses have evolved strategies to circumvent these innate defenses by using proteases that cleave MAVS to prevent its mitochondrial localization (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: BNIP3 (Bcl-2/E1B-19kDa interacting protein 3) is a pro-apoptotic mitochondrial protein and Bcl-2 family member that contains a Bcl-2 homology 3 (BH3) domain and a carboxyl-terminal transmembrane (TM) domain (1-3). While BNIP3 has a predicted molecular weight of about 22 kDa, it runs anomalously on SDS-PAGE and includes a band of around 60 kDa that may be a dimeric form that is not reduced (2). BNIP3 associates with anti-apoptotic family members Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, and the adenovirus homologue E1B-19kDa. BNIP3 is distinct from other Bcl-2 family members that contain only the BH3 domain in that the TM domain, and not the BH3 domain, is required for mitochondrial targeting and pro-apoptotic activity (4). In addition to apoptosis, BNIP3 has been implicated in necrosis (5) and autophagy (6-11). In hypoxic conditions, BNIP3 can induce mitochondrial autophagy (mitophagy) by disrupting the Bcl-2-Beclin-1 complex (9). BNIP3 can also promote mitophagy by triggering the translocation of the E3 ubiquitin ligase Parkin to the mitochondria (10) or by directly binding LC3 on the autophagosome (11). BNIP3 may also localize to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) where it can selectively induce the autophagic clearance of ER (ERphagy) (11). Increased expression of BNIP3 under hypoxic conditions is mainly regulated by the transcription factor HIF-1α (12-14). Silencing of the BNIP3 promoter by methylation has been observed in several types of cancer cells and may play an important role in their survival (14-18).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) is one of the earliest events in a cascade that controls a variety of cellular responses, including secretion, gene expression, proliferation, and muscle contraction (1,2). PKC isoforms belong to three groups based on calcium dependency and activators. Classical PKCs are calcium-dependent via their C2 domains and are activated by phosphatidylserine (PS), diacylglycerol (DAG), and phorbol esters (TPA, PMA) through their cysteine-rich C1 domains. Both novel and atypical PKCs are calcium-independent, but only novel PKCs are activated by PS, DAG, and phorbol esters (3-5). Members of these three PKC groups contain a pseudo-substrate or autoinhibitory domain that binds to substrate-binding sites in the catalytic domain to prevent activation in the absence of cofactors or activators. Control of PKC activity is regulated through three distinct phosphorylation events. Phosphorylation occurs in vivo at Thr500 in the activation loop, at Thr641 through autophosphorylation, and at the carboxy-terminal hydrophobic site Ser660 (2). Atypical PKC isoforms lack hydrophobic region phosphorylation, which correlates with the presence of glutamic acid rather than the serine or threonine residues found in more typical PKC isoforms. The enzyme PDK1 or a close relative is responsible for PKC activation. A recent addition to the PKC superfamily is PKCμ (PKD), which is regulated by DAG and TPA through its C1 domain. PKD is distinguished by the presence of a PH domain and by its unique substrate recognition and Golgi localization (6). PKC-related kinases (PRK) lack the C1 domain and do not respond to DAG or phorbol esters. Phosphatidylinositol lipids activate PRKs, and small Rho-family GTPases bind to the homology region 1 (HR1) to regulate PRK kinase activity (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Parkinson’s disease (PD), the second most common neurodegenerative disease after Alzheimer’s, is a progressive movement disorder characterized by rigidity, tremors, and postural instability. The pathological hallmarks of PD are progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra of the ventral midbrain and the presence of intracellular Lewy bodies (protein aggregates of α-synuclein, ubiquitin, and other components) in surviving neurons of the brain stem (1). Research studies have shown various genes and loci are genetically linked to PD including α-synuclein/PARK1 and 4, parkin/PARK2, UCH-L1/PARK5, PINK1/PARK6, DJ-1/PARK7, LRRK2/PARK8, synphilin-1, and NR4A2 (2).Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) contains amino-terminal leucine-rich repeats (LRR), a Ras-like small GTP binding protein-like (ROC) domain, an MLK protein kinase domain, and a carboxy-terminal WD40 repeat domain. Research studies have linked at least 20 LRRK2 mutations to PD, with the G2019S mutation being the most prevalent (3). The G2019S mutation causes increased LRRK2 kinase activity, which induces a progressive reduction in neurite length that leads to progressive neurite loss and decreased neuronal survival (4). Researchers are currently testing the MLK inhibitor CEP-1347 in PD clinical trials, indicating the potential value of LRRK2 as a therapeutic target for treatment of PD (5).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Cytochrome c oxidase (COX) is a hetero-oligomeric enzyme consisting of 13 subunits localized to the inner mitochondrial membrane (1-3). It is the terminal enzyme complex in the respiratory chain, catalyzing the reduction of molecular oxygen to water coupled to the translocation of protons across the mitochondrial inner membrane to drive ATP synthesis. The 3 largest subunits forming the catalytic core are encoded by mitochondrial DNA, while the other smaller subunits, including COX IV, are nuclear-encoded. Research studies have shown that deficiency in COX activity correlates with a number of human diseases (4). The COX IV antibody can be used effectively as a mitochondrial loading control in cell-based research assays.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The Bcl-2 family consists of a number of evolutionarily conserved proteins containing Bcl-2 homology domains (BH) that regulate apoptosis through control of mitochondrial membrane permeability and release of cytochrome c (1-3). Four BH domains have been identified (BH1-4) that mediate protein interactions. The family can be separated into three groups based upon function and sequence homology: pro-survival members include Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, Mcl-1, A1 and Bcl-w; pro-apoptotic proteins include Bax, Bak and Bok; and "BH3 only" proteins Bad, Bik, Bid, Puma, Bim, Bmf, Noxa and Hrk. Interactions between death-promoting and death-suppressing Bcl-2 family members has led to a rheostat model in which the ratio of pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic proteins controls cell fate (4). Thus, pro-survival members exert their behavior by binding to and antagonizing death-promoting members. In general, the "BH3-only members" can bind to and antagonize the pro-survival proteins leading to increased apoptosis (5). While some redundancy of this system likely exists, tissue specificity, transcriptional and post-translational regulation of many of these family members can account for distinct physiological roles.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Phospholamban (PLN) was identified as a major phosphoprotein component of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) (1). Its name, "lamban", is derived from the greek word "lambano" meaning "to receive", so named due to the fact that phospholamban is heavily phosphorylated on serine and threonine residues in response to cardiac stimulation (1). Although originally thought to be a single 20-25 kDa protein due to its electrophoretic mobility on SDS-PAGE, PLN is actually a 52 amino acid, 6 kDa, membrane-spanning protein capable of forming stable homooligomers, even in the presence of SDS (2). Despite very high expression in cardiac tissue, phospholamban is also expressed in skeletal and smooth muscle (3). Localization of PLN is limited to the SR, where it serves as a regulator of the sarco-endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase, SERCA (4). PLN binds directly to SERCA and effectively lowers its affinity for calcium, thus reducing calcium transport into the SR. Phosphorylation of PLN at Ser16 by Protein Kinase A or myotonic dystrophy protein kinase and/or phosphorylation at Thr17 by Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase results in release of PLN from SERCA, relief of this inhibition, and increased calcium uptake by the SR (reviewed in 5,6). It has long been held that phosphorylation at Ser16 and Thr17 occurs sequentially, but increasing evidence suggests that phosphorylation, especially at Thr17, may be differentially regulated (reviewed in 7,8).Rodent models of heart failure have shown that the expression level and degree of phosphorylation of PLN are critical in modulating calcium flux and contractility (reviewed in 9-11). Deletion or decreased expression of PLN promotes increased calcium flux and increased cardiac contractility, whereas overexpression of PLN results in sequestration of SERCA, decreased calcium flux, reduced contractility, and rescue of cardiac dysfunction and failure in mouse models of hypertension and cardiomyopathy (reviewed in 10). Distinct mutations in PLN have been detected in humans, resulting either in decreased or no expression of PLN protein (12,13) or binding defects between PLN, SERCA and/or regulatory proteins (14,15), both of which result in cardiac myopathy and heart failure. Interestingly, while the human phenotype of most PLN defects mimic those seen in rodent and vice versa, there are some instances where the type and severity of cardiac disease resulting from PLN mutations in rodent and human differ, making a consensus mechanism elusive.

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The annexin superfamily consists of 13 calcium or calcium and phospholipid binding proteins with high biological and structural homology (1). Annexin-1 (ANXA1) is the first characterized member of the annexin family of proteins and is able to bind to cellular membranes in a calcium-dependent manner, promoting membrane fusion and endocytosis (2-4). Annexin A1 has anti-inflammatory properties and inhibits phospholipase A2 activity (5,6). Annexin A1 can accumulate on internalized vesicles after EGF-stimulated endocytosis and may be required for a late stage in inward vesiculation (7). Phosphorylation by PKC, EGFR, and Chak1 results in inhibition of annexin A1 function (8-10). Annexin A1 has also been identified as one of the 'eat-me' signals on apoptotic cells that are to be recognized and ingested by phagocytes (11). Annexin A1, as an endogenous anti-inflammatory mediator, has roles in many diverse cellular functions, such as membrane aggregation, inflammation, phagocytosis, proliferation, apoptosis, and tumorigenesis and cancer development (12-14).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated PKCα (D7E6E) Rabbit mAb #59754.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) is one of the earliest events in a cascade that controls a variety of cellular responses, including secretion, gene expression, proliferation, and muscle contraction (1,2). PKC isoforms belong to three groups based on calcium dependency and activators. Classical PKCs are calcium-dependent via their C2 domains and are activated by phosphatidylserine (PS), diacylglycerol (DAG), and phorbol esters (TPA, PMA) through their cysteine-rich C1 domains. Both novel and atypical PKCs are calcium-independent, but only novel PKCs are activated by PS, DAG, and phorbol esters (3-5). Members of these three PKC groups contain a pseudo-substrate or autoinhibitory domain that binds to substrate-binding sites in the catalytic domain to prevent activation in the absence of cofactors or activators. Control of PKC activity is regulated through three distinct phosphorylation events. Phosphorylation occurs in vivo at Thr500 in the activation loop, at Thr641 through autophosphorylation, and at the carboxy-terminal hydrophobic site Ser660 (2). Atypical PKC isoforms lack hydrophobic region phosphorylation, which correlates with the presence of glutamic acid rather than the serine or threonine residues found in more typical PKC isoforms. The enzyme PDK1 or a close relative is responsible for PKC activation. A recent addition to the PKC superfamily is PKCμ (PKD), which is regulated by DAG and TPA through its C1 domain. PKD is distinguished by the presence of a PH domain and by its unique substrate recognition and Golgi localization (6). PKC-related kinases (PRK) lack the C1 domain and do not respond to DAG or phorbol esters. Phosphatidylinositol lipids activate PRKs, and small Rho-family GTPases bind to the homology region 1 (HR1) to regulate PRK kinase activity (7).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Annexin A1 (D5V2T) XP® Rabbit mAb #32934.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: The annexin superfamily consists of 13 calcium or calcium and phospholipid binding proteins with high biological and structural homology (1). Annexin-1 (ANXA1) is the first characterized member of the annexin family of proteins and is able to bind to cellular membranes in a calcium-dependent manner, promoting membrane fusion and endocytosis (2-4). Annexin A1 has anti-inflammatory properties and inhibits phospholipase A2 activity (5,6). Annexin A1 can accumulate on internalized vesicles after EGF-stimulated endocytosis and may be required for a late stage in inward vesiculation (7). Phosphorylation by PKC, EGFR, and Chak1 results in inhibition of annexin A1 function (8-10). Annexin A1 has also been identified as one of the 'eat-me' signals on apoptotic cells that are to be recognized and ingested by phagocytes (11). Annexin A1, as an endogenous anti-inflammatory mediator, has roles in many diverse cellular functions, such as membrane aggregation, inflammation, phagocytosis, proliferation, apoptosis, and tumorigenesis and cancer development (12-14).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Autophagy is a catabolic process for the autophagosomic-lysosomal degradation of proteins activated in response to nutrient deprivation and in neurodegenerative conditions (1). One of the proteins critical to this process is Beclin-1, the mammalian orthologue of the yeast autophagy protein Apg6/Vps30 (2). Beclin-1 can complement defects in yeast autophagy caused by loss of Apg6 and can also stimulate autophagy when overexpressed in mammalian cells (3). Mammalian Beclin-1 was originally isolated in a yeast two-hybrid screen for Bcl-2 interacting proteins and has been shown to interact with Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL, but not with Bax or Bak (4). While Beclin-1 is generally ubiquitously expressed, research studies have shown it is monoallelically deleted in 40-75% of sporadic human breast and ovarian cancers (5). Beclin-1 is localized within cytoplasmic structures including the mitochondria, although overexpression of Beclin-1 reveals some nuclear staining and CRM1-dependent nuclear export (6). Investigators have demonstrated that Beclin-1-/- mice die early in embryogenesis and Beclin-1-/+ mice have a high incidence of spontaneous tumors. Stem cells from the null mice demonstrate an altered autophagic response, although responses to apoptosis appeared normal (7). Researchers have also found that overexpression of Beclin-1 in virally infected neurons in vivo resulted in significant protection against Sindbis virus-induced disease and neuronal apoptosis (4).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Clusterin (CLU, apolipoprotein J) is a multifunctional glycoprotein that is expressed ubiquitously in most tissues. Clusterin functions as a secreted chaperone protein that interacts with and stabilizes stress-induced proteins to prevent their precipitation (1,2). Research studies show that clusterin plays a protective role in Alzheimer’s disease by sequestering amyloid β(1-40) peptides to form long-lived, stable complexes, which prevents amyloid fibril formation (3-5).In addition to the secreted protein, several intracellular isoforms are localized to the nucleus, mitochondria, cytoplasm, and ER. The subcellular distribution of these multiple isoforms leads to the diversity of clusterin functions. Additional studies report that clusterin is involved in membrane recycling, cell adhesion, cell proliferation, apoptosis, and tumor survival (6-9). The clusterin precursor is post-translationally cleaved into the mature clusterin α and clusterin β forms. Clusterin α and β chains create a heterodimer through formation of disulfide bonds (10).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Autophagy is a catabolic process for the autophagosomic-lysosomal degradation of proteins activated in response to nutrient deprivation and in neurodegenerative conditions (1). One of the proteins critical to this process is Beclin-1, the mammalian orthologue of the yeast autophagy protein Apg6/Vps30 (2). Beclin-1 can complement defects in yeast autophagy caused by loss of Apg6 and can also stimulate autophagy when overexpressed in mammalian cells (3). Mammalian Beclin-1 was originally isolated in a yeast two-hybrid screen for Bcl-2 interacting proteins and has been shown to interact with Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL, but not with Bax or Bak (4). While Beclin-1 is generally ubiquitously expressed, research studies have shown it is monoallelically deleted in 40-75% of sporadic human breast and ovarian cancers (5). Beclin-1 is localized within cytoplasmic structures including the mitochondria, although overexpression of Beclin-1 reveals some nuclear staining and CRM1-dependent nuclear export (6). Investigators have demonstrated that Beclin-1-/- mice die early in embryogenesis and Beclin-1-/+ mice have a high incidence of spontaneous tumors. Stem cells from the null mice demonstrate an altered autophagic response, although responses to apoptosis appeared normal (7). Researchers have also found that overexpression of Beclin-1 in virally infected neurons in vivo resulted in significant protection against Sindbis virus-induced disease and neuronal apoptosis (4).