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Monoclonal Antibody Regulation of Somitogenesis

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Lunatic Fringe (Beta-1,3-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase, LFNG) is a single-pass type II Golgi membrane glycosyltransferase that catalyzes the elongation of O-linked fucose residues on EGF-like repeats of Notch signaling molecules. Fucosylation of EGF-like repeats serves to fine-tune Notch ligand-receptor interactions, thereby modulating downstream Notch pathway activity (1). Studies in genetic mouse models have shown that Lunatic Fringe-mediated Notch regulation is critical for somite patterning during vertebrate embryogenesis (2-4). Consistent with this, loss-of-function mutations in human LFNG are associated with spondylocostal dysostoses, a heritable skeletal growth disorder characterized by malformations of the spinal column and thoracic structures (5). Lunatic Fringe continues to modulate Notch signaling postnatally (6), and is implicated as a putative tumor suppressor in multiple Notch-related cancers (7, 8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Notch proteins (Notch1-4) are a family of transmembrane receptors that play important roles in development and the determination of cell fate (1). Mature Notch receptors are processed and assembled as heterodimeric proteins, with each dimer comprised of a large extracellular ligand-binding domain, a single-pass transmembrane domain, and a smaller cytoplasmic subunit (Notch intracellular domain, NICD) (2). Binding of Notch receptors to ligands of the Delta-Serrate-Lag2 (DSL) family triggers heterodimer dissociation, exposing the receptors to proteolytic cleavages; these result in release of the NICD, which translocates to the nucleus and activates transcription of downstream target genes (3,4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Notch proteins (Notch1-4) are a family of transmembrane receptors that play important roles in development and the determination of cell fate (1). Mature Notch receptors are processed and assembled as heterodimeric proteins, with each dimer comprised of a large extracellular ligand-binding domain, a single-pass transmembrane domain, and a smaller cytoplasmic subunit (Notch intracellular domain, NICD) (2). Binding of Notch receptors to ligands of the Delta-Serrate-Lag2 (DSL) family triggers heterodimer dissociation, exposing the receptors to proteolytic cleavages; these result in release of the NICD, which translocates to the nucleus and activates transcription of downstream target genes (3,4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Notch proteins (Notch1-4) are a family of transmembrane receptors that play important roles in development and the determination of cell fate (1). Mature Notch receptors are processed and assembled as heterodimeric proteins, with each dimer comprised of a large extracellular ligand-binding domain, a single-pass transmembrane domain, and a smaller cytoplasmic subunit (Notch intracellular domain, NICD) (2). Binding of Notch receptors to ligands of the Delta-Serrate-Lag2 (DSL) family triggers heterodimer dissociation, exposing the receptors to proteolytic cleavages; these result in release of the NICD, which translocates to the nucleus and activates transcription of downstream target genes (3,4).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Notch proteins (Notch1-4) are a family of transmembrane receptors that play important roles in development and the determination of cell fate (1). Mature Notch receptors are processed and assembled as heterodimeric proteins, with each dimer comprised of a large extracellular ligand-binding domain, a single-pass transmembrane domain, and a smaller cytoplasmic subunit (Notch intracellular domain, NICD) (2). Binding of Notch receptors to ligands of the Delta-Serrate-Lag2 (DSL) family triggers heterodimer dissociation, exposing the receptors to proteolytic cleavages; these result in release of the NICD, which translocates to the nucleus and activates transcription of downstream target genes (3,4).

$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Notch proteins (Notch1-4) are a family of transmembrane receptors that play important roles in development and the determination of cell fate (1). Mature Notch receptors are processed and assembled as heterodimeric proteins, with each dimer comprised of a large extracellular ligand-binding domain, a single-pass transmembrane domain, and a smaller cytoplasmic subunit (Notch intracellular domain, NICD) (2). Binding of Notch receptors to ligands of the Delta-Serrate-Lag2 (DSL) family triggers heterodimer dissociation, exposing the receptors to proteolytic cleavages; these result in release of the NICD, which translocates to the nucleus and activates transcription of downstream target genes (3,4).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Notch proteins (Notch1-4) are a family of transmembrane receptors that play important roles in development and the determination of cell fate (1). Mature Notch receptors are processed and assembled as heterodimeric proteins, with each dimer comprised of a large extracellular ligand-binding domain, a single-pass transmembrane domain, and a smaller cytoplasmic subunit (Notch intracellular domain, NICD) (2). Binding of Notch receptors to ligands of the Delta-Serrate-Lag2 (DSL) family triggers heterodimer dissociation, exposing the receptors to proteolytic cleavages; these result in release of the NICD, which translocates to the nucleus and activates transcription of downstream target genes (3,4).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Notch1 (D6F11) XP® Rabbit mAb #4380.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Notch proteins (Notch1-4) are a family of transmembrane receptors that play important roles in development and the determination of cell fate (1). Mature Notch receptors are processed and assembled as heterodimeric proteins, with each dimer comprised of a large extracellular ligand-binding domain, a single-pass transmembrane domain, and a smaller cytoplasmic subunit (Notch intracellular domain, NICD) (2). Binding of Notch receptors to ligands of the Delta-Serrate-Lag2 (DSL) family triggers heterodimer dissociation, exposing the receptors to proteolytic cleavages; these result in release of the NICD, which translocates to the nucleus and activates transcription of downstream target genes (3,4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Class 3 secreted semaphorin (Sema3A) is a chemorepellent that acts upon a wide variety of axons. As such, it induces a dramatic redistribution and depolymerization of actin filaments that results in growth cone collapse. Plexins are single membrane-spanning signaling proteins encompassing Plexin A1, A2, A3, and A4. Plexins form a complex with neuropilin-1 and -2 and the cell adhesion protein L1 to form a functional semaphorin receptor (1,2). The GTPase Rnd1 binds to the cytoplasmic domain of Plexin A1 to trigger cytoskeletal collapse. In contrast, the GTPase RhoD blocks Rnd1-mediated Plexin A1 activation and repulsion of sympathetic axons by Sema3A (3).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Notch signaling is activated upon engagement of the Notch receptor with its ligands, the DSL (Delta, Serrate, Lag2) proteins of single-pass type I membrane proteins. The DSL proteins contain multiple EGF-like repeats and a DSL domain that is required for binding to Notch (1,2). Five DSL proteins have been identified in mammals: Jagged1, Jagged2, Delta-like (DLL) 1, 3 and 4 (3). Ligand binding to the Notch receptor results in two sequential proteolytic cleavages of the receptor by the ADAM protease and the γ-secretase complex. The intracellular domain of Notch is released and then translocates to the nucleus where it activates transcription. Notch ligands may also be processed in a way similar to Notch, suggesting a bi-directional signaling through receptor-ligand interactions (4-6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Class 3 secreted semaphorin (Sema3A) is a chemorepellent that acts upon a wide variety of axons. As such, it induces a dramatic redistribution and depolymerization of actin filaments that results in growth cone collapse. Plexins are single membrane-spanning signaling proteins encompassing Plexin A1, A2, A3, and A4. Plexins form a complex with neuropilin-1 and -2 and the cell adhesion protein L1 to form a functional semaphorin receptor (1,2). The GTPase Rnd1 binds to the cytoplasmic domain of Plexin A1 to trigger cytoskeletal collapse. In contrast, the GTPase RhoD blocks Rnd1-mediated Plexin A1 activation and repulsion of sympathetic axons by Sema3A (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Abi1, Abi2 and Abi3 are members of the Abl1 interactor family, which function as adaptor signaling molecules down stream of the receptor tyrosine kinase Ab1 (1-3). In addition to Abl, Abi1 has been shown to interact with the important signaling transducers WAVE and p85PI3K to regulate cytoskeletal and growth signaling (4,5). Along its sequences, Abi1 has multiple modules for carrying on these interactions. It has a WAVE binding domain, which allows it to interact with WAVE, a homeo-domain/PEST domain, which, when phosphorylated can acts as a docking site for SH2 binding, a PXXP sequence to interact with the SH3 domain of Abl, and a C-terminal SH3 domain for interaction with the proline rich region of Ab1 (4,5). Abl can phosphorylate Abi1 on Y213 (6), the phosphorylated sequence serves as a docking site for both the SH2 domain of Abl and the SH2 domain of p85PI3K (7). Another important phosphorylation site for Abi1 is Y435. Phosphorylation of Abi1 at Y435 promotes tumor cell adhesion and invasion (8).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Brachyury (D2Z3J) Rabbit mAb #81694.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Brachyury protein, encoded by the T gene, is a transcription factor that is vital for the formation of posterior mesoderm and axial development during vertebrate embryogenesis (1). In the mouse, brachyury is necessary for mesodermal morphogenetic cell movements during gastrulation. Brachyury mutant mice die in utero and display deficient mesoderm formation including an abnormal notochord, missing posterior somites, and a reduced allantois (2). Human brachyury is expressed in the notochord, as well as in chordoma tumors that occur along the spine, making it a good marker for notochord and notochord-derived tumors (3,4). A common polymorphism in the human T gene has also been shown to be associated with development of the multifactorial neural tube defect, spina bifida (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Brachyury protein, encoded by the T gene, is a transcription factor that is vital for the formation of posterior mesoderm and axial development during vertebrate embryogenesis (1). In the mouse, brachyury is necessary for mesodermal morphogenetic cell movements during gastrulation. Brachyury mutant mice die in utero and display deficient mesoderm formation including an abnormal notochord, missing posterior somites, and a reduced allantois (2). Human brachyury is expressed in the notochord, as well as in chordoma tumors that occur along the spine, making it a good marker for notochord and notochord-derived tumors (3,4). A common polymorphism in the human T gene has also been shown to be associated with development of the multifactorial neural tube defect, spina bifida (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: ROR1 and ROR2 are orphan receptor tyrosine kinases that are most closely related to MuSK and the Trk family of neurotrophin receptors. They are characterized by the presence of extracellular frizzled-like cysteine-rich domains and membrane-proximal kringle domains, both of which are assumed to mediate protein-protein interactions (1-3). The ROR family RTKs are evolutionarily conserved among Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila, mice, and humans (1,4). Although the functions of ROR kinases are unknown, similarities between ROR and MuSK and Trk kinases have led to speculation that ROR kinases regulate synaptic development. CAM-1, a C. elegans ortholog of the ROR family RTKs, plays several important roles in regulating cellular migration, polarity of asymmetric cell divisions, and axonal outgrowth of neurons during nematode development (4). mROR1 and mROR2 may play differential roles during the development of the nervous system (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Ataxia telangiectasia mutated kinase (ATM) is a serine/threonine kinase that regulates cell cycle checkpoints and DNA repair (1). Activation of ATM by autophosphorylation on Ser1981 occurs in response to exposed DNA double stranded breaks. ATM kinase regulates a number of proteins involved in cell cycle checkpoint control, apoptosis, and DNA repair. Known substrates include p53, Chk2, Chk1, CtIP, 4E-BP1, BRCA1, RPA3, H2A.X, SMC1, FANCD2, Rad17, Artemis, Nbs1, and the I-2 regulatory subunit of PP1 (1,2). Mutations in the corresponding ATM gene result in ataxia telangiectasia (AT), an autosomal recessive disease characterized by uncoordinated muscle movement and neurodegeneration. Cells from AT patients display defective DNA damage-induced checkpoint activation, sensitivity to radiation, and a higher frequency of chromosome breakage (3,4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Forkhead box (Fox) proteins are a family of evolutionarily conserved transcription factors defined by the presence of a winged helix DNA binding domain called a Forkhead box (1). In humans, there are over 40 known Fox protein family members, divided into 19 subfamilies, which have evolved to regulate gene transcription in diverse and highly specialized biological contexts throughout development (2). Mutations that disrupt the expression of Fox gene family members have consequently been implicated in a broad array of human disorders, including immunological dysfunction, infertility, speech/language disorders, and cancer (3,4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is an important factor in the repair of double-stranded breaks in DNA. Cells lacking DNA-PK or in which DNA-PK is inhibited fail to show proper nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) (1-7). DNA-PK is composed of two DNA-binding subunits (Ku70 and Ku86) and one 450 kDa catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) (8). It is thought that a heterodimer of Ku70 and Ku86 binds to double-stranded DNA broken ends before DNA-PKcs binds and is activated (1,9). Activated DNA-PKcs is a serine/threonine kinase that has been shown to phosphorylate a number of proteins in vitro, including p53, transcription factors, RNA polymerase, and Ku70/Ku86 (10,11). DNA-PKcs autophosphorylation at multiple sites, including Thr2609 and Ser2056, results in an inactivation of DNA-PK kinase activity and NHEJ ability (12,13). It has been demonstrated, however, that DNA-PK preferentially phosphorylates substrates before it autophosphorylates, suggesting that DNA-PK autophosphorylation may play a role in disassembly of the DNA repair machinery (14,15). Autophosphorylation at Thr2609 has also been shown to be required for DNA-PK-mediated double strand break repair, and phosphorylated DNA-PK co-localizes with H2A.X and 53BP1 at sites of DNA damage (16). Phosphorylation at Ser2056 occurs in response to double-stranded DNA breaks and ATM activation (17).

$129
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: NKX3.1 is a homeobox transcription factor that in mammals plays a defining role in embryonic prostate morphogenesis. The expression of mammalian NKX3.1 is androgen-dependent, restricted primarily to developing and mature prostate epithelium, and is frequently reduced or lost in prostate cancer (1-3). The human NKX3.1 gene is located on chromsome 8p21.2, within a region that shows loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in >50% of prostate cancer cases (2). Allelic loss at the NKX3.1 locus is also common in high grade Prostate Intraepithelial Neoplasia (PIN), thought to be a putative precursor lesion to invasive prostate adenocarcinomas, suggesting that LOH at the NKX3.1 locus is a critical early step in prostate cancer development (4). Notably, the remaining NKX3.1 allele is intact in the majority of LOH cases, leading to the suggestion that NKX3.1 functions as a haploinsufficient tumor suppressor (4-6). Due to its highly restricted expression in prostate epithelial cells, NKX3.1 has been suggested as a diagnostic marker of prostate carcinoma (7), and may have additional utility as a biomarker of metastatic lesions originating in the prostate (8).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The p53 tumor suppressor protein plays a major role in cellular response to DNA damage and other genomic aberrations. Activation of p53 can lead to either cell cycle arrest and DNA repair or apoptosis (1). p53 is phosphorylated at multiple sites in vivo and by several different protein kinases in vitro (2,3). DNA damage induces phosphorylation of p53 at Ser15 and Ser20 and leads to a reduced interaction between p53 and its negative regulator, the oncoprotein MDM2 (4). MDM2 inhibits p53 accumulation by targeting it for ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation (5,6). p53 can be phosphorylated by ATM, ATR, and DNA-PK at Ser15 and Ser37. Phosphorylation impairs the ability of MDM2 to bind p53, promoting both the accumulation and activation of p53 in response to DNA damage (4,7). Chk2 and Chk1 can phosphorylate p53 at Ser20, enhancing its tetramerization, stability, and activity (8,9). p53 is phosphorylated at Ser392 in vivo (10,11) and by CAK in vitro (11). Phosphorylation of p53 at Ser392 is increased in human tumors (12) and has been reported to influence the growth suppressor function, DNA binding, and transcriptional activation of p53 (10,13,14). p53 is phosphorylated at Ser6 and Ser9 by CK1δ and CK1ε both in vitro and in vivo (13,15). Phosphorylation of p53 at Ser46 regulates the ability of p53 to induce apoptosis (16). Acetylation of p53 is mediated by p300 and CBP acetyltransferases. Inhibition of deacetylation suppressing MDM2 from recruiting HDAC1 complex by p19 (ARF) stabilizes p53. Acetylation appears to play a positive role in the accumulation of p53 protein in stress response (17). Following DNA damage, human p53 becomes acetylated at Lys382 (Lys379 in mouse) in vivo to enhance p53-DNA binding (18). Deacetylation of p53 occurs through interaction with the SIRT1 protein, a deacetylase that may be involved in cellular aging and the DNA damage response (19).