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Polyclonal Antibody Gaba Receptor Binding

Also showing Polyclonal Antibody Western Blotting Gaba Receptor Binding

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: JAKMIP1, or Janus kinase and microtubule interactin protein 1, localizes in mitrotubules and the plasma membrane, which associates with microtubules and plays a role in migration of pyramidal neurons (1). JAKMIP1 participates in the microtubule-dependent transport of GABA-B receptor (2). It is also linked to autistic-spectrum disorders (3,4). JAKMIP1 may participate in the JAK1 pathway (5).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
D. melanogaster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Protein phosphatase type 2A (PP2A) is an essential protein serine/threonine phosphatase that is conserved in all eukaryotes. PP2A is a key enzyme within various signal transduction pathways as it regulates fundamental cellular activities such as DNA replication, transcription, translation, metabolism, cell cycle progression, cell division, apoptosis and development (1-3). The core enzyme consists of catalytic C and regulatory A (or PR65) subunits, with each subunit represented by α and β isoforms (1). Additional regulatory subunits belong to four different families of unrelated proteins. Both the B (or PR55) and B' regulatory protein families contain α, β, γ and δ isoforms, with the B' family also including an ε protein. B'' family proteins include PR72, PR130, PR59 and PR48 isoforms, while striatin (PR110) and SG2NA (PR93) are both members of the B''' regulatory protein family. These B subunits competitively bind to a shared binding site on the core A subunit (1). This variable array of holoenzyme components, particularly regulatory B subunits, allows PP2A to act in a diverse set of functions. PP2A function is regulated by expression, localization, holoenzyme composition and post-translational modification. Phosphorylation of PP2A at Tyr307 by Src occurs in response to EGF or insulin and results in a substantial reduction of PP2A activity (4). Reversible methylation on the carboxyl group of Leu309 of PP2A has been observed (5,6). Methylation alters the conformation of PP2A, as well as its localization and association with B regulatory subunits (6-8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid) is the primary inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system and interacts with three different receptors: GABA(A), GABA(B) and GABA(C) receptor. The ionotropic GABA(A) and GABA(C) receptors are ligand-gated ion channels that produce fast inhibitory synaptic transmission. In contrast, the metabotropic GABA(B) receptor is coupled to G proteins that modulate slow inhibitory synaptic transmission (1). Functional GABA(B) receptors form heterodimers of GABA(B)R1 and GABA(B)R2 where GABA(B)R1 binds the ligand and GABA(B)R2 is the primary G protein contact site (2). Two isoforms of GABA(B)R1 have been cloned: GABA(B)R1a is a 130 kD protein and GABA(B)R1b is a 95 kD protein (3). G proteins subsequently inhibit adenyl cylase activity and modulate inositol phospholipid hydrolysis. GABA(B) receptors have both pre- and postsynaptic inhibitions: presynaptic GABA(B) receptors inhibit neurotransmitter release through suppression of high threshold calcium channels, while postsynaptic GABA(B) receptors inhibit through coupled activation of inwardly rectifying potassium channels. In addition to synaptic inhibition, GABA(B) receptors may also be involved in hippocampal long-term potentiation, slow wave sleep and muscle relaxation (1).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid) is the primary inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system and interacts with three different receptors: GABA(A), GABA(B) and GABA(C) receptor. The ionotropic GABA(A) and GABA(C) receptors are ligand-gated ion channels that produce fast inhibitory synaptic transmission. In contrast, the metabotropic GABA(B) receptor is coupled to G proteins that modulate slow inhibitory synaptic transmission (1). Functional GABA(B) receptors form heterodimers of GABA(B)R1 and GABA(B)R2 where GABA(B)R1 binds the ligand and GABA(B)R2 is the primary G protein contact site (2). Two isoforms of GABA(B)R1 have been cloned: GABA(B)R1a is a 130 kD protein and GABA(B)R1b is a 95 kD protein (3). G proteins subsequently inhibit adenyl cylase activity and modulate inositol phospholipid hydrolysis. GABA(B) receptors have both pre- and postsynaptic inhibitions: presynaptic GABA(B) receptors inhibit neurotransmitter release through suppression of high threshold calcium channels, while postsynaptic GABA(B) receptors inhibit through coupled activation of inwardly rectifying potassium channels. In addition to synaptic inhibition, GABA(B) receptors may also be involved in hippocampal long-term potentiation, slow wave sleep and muscle relaxation (1).