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Polyclonal Antibody Immunofluorescence Immunocytochemistry Rna Binding

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Ribosomal protein L7a is a highly conserved ribosome protein localized to 60S ribosomal subunit (1). The protein has distinct domains that target the newly synthesized polypeptide to nucleus and the nucleoli, the site of ribosome biosynthesis (2). Ribosomal protein L7a can also interact with RNA in vitro through two distinct RNA-binding domains in the protein (3). Taken together, nucleolar localization and the ability to bind RNA suggests that ribosomal protein L7a may act as an important component for ribosome biosynthesis and function.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) belongs to a family of RNA binding multiprotein complexes (hnRNP proteins) that facilitate pre-mRNA processing and transport of mRNA from the nucleus to cytoplasm (1-3). hnRNP K contains three unique structural motifs termed KH domains that bind poly(C) DNA and RNA sequences (4,5). Intricate architecture enables hnRNP K to facilitate mRNA biosynthesis (6), transcriptional regulation (7), and signal transduction. Research studies have shown that cytoplasmic hnRNP K expression is increased in oral squamous cell carcinoma and pancreatic cancer, and may be a potential prognostic factor (8,9). hnRNP K coordinates with p53 to regulate its target gene transcription in response to DNA damage. Proteasome degradation of hnRNP K is mediated by E3 ligase MDM2 (10). The interaction between hnRNP K and c-Src leads to hnRNP K phosphorylation, which allows for hnRNP K activation of silenced mRNA translation (11).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: PU.1 is a member of the Ets family of transcription factors and activates target genes through the purine-rich PU-box (1). PU.1 plays a pivotal role in the differentiation of myeloid cells and lymphocytes and is expressed in several hematopoietic cells including B lymphocytes, macrophages, neutrophils, mast cells, early erythroid cells, and megakaryocytes (1,2). The concentration of PU.1 is critical for both the determination of hematopoietic cell lineage and the regulation of differentiation versus stem cell proliferation (3,4). In addition, PU.1 activity is influenced by phosphorylation and interactions with other hematopoietic transcription factors. Phosphorylation of PU.1 at Ser146 by CK2 promotes binding to IRF4 and synergistic activation through the immunoglobulin κ 3' enhancer (5). Treatment of pro-B cells with IL-3 leads to phosphorylation of PU.1 at Ser140, resulting in increased PU.1 activity and activation of the anti-apoptotic gene MCL-1 (6). GATA1 binding blocks PU.1 activity during erythroid cell development (7). Overexpression of PU.1 resulting from proviral insertion during Friend virus infection can induce erythroleukemia, while reduced expression has been associated with acute myeloid leukemia (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Clathrin-coated vesicles provide for the intracellular transport of cargo proteins following endocytosis and during multiple vesicle trafficking pathways. Vesicles form at specialized areas of the cell membrane where clathrin and associated proteins form clathrin-coated pits. Invagination of these cell membrane-associated pits internalizes proteins and forms an intracellular clathrin-coated vesicle (1,2). Clathrin is the most abundant protein in these vesicles and is present as a basic assembly unit called a triskelion. Each clathrin triskelion is composed of three clathrin heavy chains and three clathrin light chains. Clathrin heavy chain proteins are composed of several functional domains, including a carboxy-terminal region that permits interaction with other heavy chain proteins within a triskelion, and a globular amino-terminal region that associates with other vesicle proteins (2). Adaptor proteins, such as AP2, epsin and EPS15, are responsible for the recruitment of vesicle proteins to sites of pit formation and the assembly of the clathrin-coated vesicle. Following vesicle invagination, the GTPase dynamin constricts the neck of the nascent vesicle to complete formation of the free, cytosolic vesicle (3,4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A0 (hnRNP A0) is a member of the hnRNP A/B family of related RNA binding proteins that bind pre-mRNA and are involved in the processing, metabolism, and transport of nuclear pre-mRNA transcripts (1). The A/B subfamily of hnRNP includes A1, A2/B1, A3, and A0. hnRNP A0 is phosphorylated at Ser84 by MAPKAPK-2 in response to LPS treatment in mouse macrophage cells, which might play a key role in stimulating translation of the TNF-α message (2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 (hnRNP A1) is a member of the hnRNP A/B family of related RNA binding proteins that bind pre-mRNA and are involved in the processing, metabolism, and transport of nuclear pre-mRNA transcripts (1). hnRNP A1 regulates the alternative splicing of c-Src and c-H-Ras (2,3) and modifies initiation of translation of the fibroblast growth factor 2 mRNA (4). hnRNP A1 expression level is elevated in many cancers; knockdown of hnRNP A1 leads to apoptosis in various cancer cells (5). Although predominantly nuclear, hnRNP A1 is continually transported from the nucleus to the cytoplasm where it disassociates from mRNA and is rapidly re-imported into the nucleus (6,7). hnRNP A1 binds to cis-acting repressive sequences (CRS) of HIV-1 to influence HIV-1 production (8,9). HIV-1 enhances hnRNP A1 expression and promotes the relocalization of hnRNP A1 to the cytoplasm (10).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Eukaryotic initiation factor 4B (eIF4B) is thought to assist the eIF4F complex in translation initiation. In plants, eIF4B is known to interact with the poly-(A) binding protein, increasing its poly-(A) binding activity (1). Heat shock and serum starvation cause dephosphorylation of eIF4B at multiple sites with kinetics similar to those of the corresponding inhibition of translation, while phosphorylation of eIF4B following insulin treatment correlates well with an observed increase in translation (2-5). Multiple kinases, including p70 S6 kinase, can phosphorylate eIF4B in vitro, and at least one serum-inducible eIF4B phosphorylation site is sensitive to rapamycin and LY294002 (6). Recently, Ser406 was identified as a novel phosphorylation site regulated by mitogens (7), and the phosphorylation of this site is dependent on MEK and mTOR activity (7). This phosphorylation is shown to be essential for the translational activity of eIF4B (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: A variety of factors contribute to the initiation of translation. Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4H (eIF4H) was purified to near homogeneity from rabbit reticulocyte lysate and shown to stimulate translation in an assay deficient in eIF4F and eIF4B (1). eIF4H induces the RNA-dependent ATP hydrolysis catalyzed by the initiation factors eIF4A and eIF4B (1,2). eIF4H was further shown to stimulate the initial rate and extent of eIF4A-mediated mRNA secondary structure unwinding (3). Interaction between eIF4H and the herpes simplex virus shutoff protein (Vhs) appears to be important for Vhs-mediated degradation of mRNA (4). Deletion of a large region of chromosome 7, including the corresponding eIF4H gene, results in Williams-Beuren Syndrome (WBS), an autosomal dominant disorder that can present with cardiovascular problems, mental retardation and distinctive facial features (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: TDP43 (TAR DNA-binding protein 43) is involved in transcriptional regulation and exon splicing (1,2). While normal TDP43 is a nuclear protein, pathological TDP43 is a component of insoluble aggregates in patients with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). In these disorders, TDP43 is abnormally ubiquitinated, phosphorylated and cleaved to generate carboxy-terminal fragments that are sequestered as insoluble aggregates in neuronal nuclei, perikarya, and neurites (3,4). Additionally, TDP43 inhibits the expression of the HIV-1 gene and regulates CFTR gene splicing (1,5).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: microfilaments (actin filaments), intermediate filaments, and microtubules. Major types of intermediate filaments are distinguished by their cell-specific expression: cytokeratins (epithelial cells), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) (glial cells), desmin (skeletal, visceral, and certain vascular smooth muscle cells), vimentin (mesenchyme origin), and neurofilaments (neurons). GFAP and vimentin form intermediate filaments in astroglial cells and modulate their motility and shape (1). In particular, vimentin filaments are present at early developmental stages, while GFAP filaments are characteristic of differentiated and mature brain astrocytes. Thus, GFAP is commonly used as a marker for intracranial and intraspinal tumors arising from astrocytes (2). Research studies have shown that vimentin is present in sarcomas, but not carcinomas, and its expression is examined in conjunction with that of other markers to distinguish between the two (3). Vimentin's dynamic structural changes and spatial re-organization in response to extracellular stimuli help to coordinate various signaling pathways (4). Phosphorylation of vimentin at Ser56 in smooth muscle cells regulates the structural arrangement of vimentin filaments in response to serotonin (5,6). Remodeling of vimentin and other intermediate filaments is important during lymphocyte adhesion and migration through the endothelium (7).During mitosis, CDK1 phosphorylates vimentin at Ser56. This phosphorylation provides a PLK binding site for vimentin-PLK interaction. PLK further phosphorylates vimentin at Ser82, which might serve as memory phosphorylation site and play a regulatory role in vimentin filament disassembly (8,9). Additionally, studies using various soft-tissue sarcoma cells have shown that phosphorylation of vimentin at Ser39 by Akt1 enhances cell migration and survival, suggesting that vimentin could be a potential target for soft-tissue sarcoma targeted therapy (10,11).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: The Y-box binding protein 1 (YB1) belongs to a family of evolutionarily conserved, multifunctional Y-box proteins that bind single-stranded DNA and RNA and function as regulators of transcription, RNA metabolism, and protein synthesis (1). YB1 binds to Y-box sequences (TAACC) found in multiple gene promoters and can positively or negatively regulate transcription. YB1 activates genes associated with proliferation and cancer, such as cyclin A, cyclin B1, matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), and the multi-drug resistance 1 (MDR1) gene (2-4). YB1 represses genes associated with cell death, including the Fas cell death-associated receptor and the p53 tumor suppressor gene (5-7). It also interacts with the RNA-splicing factor SRp30c and stabilizes interleukin-2 (IL-2) mRNA upon induction of T lymphocytes by IL-2 (8,9). The majority of YB1 protein localizes to the cytoplasm, with a minor pool found in the nucleus; however, nuclear localization appears to be critical for its role in promoting proliferation. Nuclear translocation is cell cycle regulated, with YB1 protein accumulating in the nucleus during G1/S phase (2). In addition, nuclear translocation is induced in response to extracellular stimuli such as hyperthermia and UV irradiation, or treatment of cells with thrombin, interferons, or insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I) (2,10). Treatment of the MCF7 breast cancer cell line with IGF-I results in Akt-mediated phosphorylation of YB1 at Ser102, which is required for nuclear translocation of YB1 and its ability to promote anchorage-independent growth (10). Research studies have shown that YB1 is overexpressed in many malignant tissues, including breast cancer, non-small cell lung carcinoma, ovarian adenocarcinomas, human osteosarcomas, colorectal carcinomas, and malignant melanomas. Investigators have shown that nuclear YB1 expression correlates with high levels of proliferation, drug resistance, and poor tumor prognosis (2,7,10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: TIAR is a member of the RNA-recognition motif (RRM) family of RNA-binding proteins (1,2). It functions as a translational repressor under conditions of cellular damage (3,4). In response to cellular stress, TIAR associates with eIF1, eIF3, and the 40S ribosomal subunit and forms noncanonical preinitiation complexes that are translationally inactive (3,4). TIAR then aggregates with its family member TIA1 and facilitates the accumulation of the translationally inactive preinitiation complexes into discrete cytoplasmic foci called stress granules. The two major isoforms of TIAR are the products of alternative mRNA splicing (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: α-Actinin belongs to the spectrin family of cytoskeletal proteins. It was first recognized as an actin cross-linking protein, forming an antiparallel homodimer with an actin binding head at the amino terminus of each monomer. The α-actinin protein interacts with a large number of proteins involved in signaling to the cytoskeleton, including those involved in cellular adhesion, migration, and immune cell targeting (1). The interaction of α-actinin with intercellular adhesion molecule-5 (ICAM-5) helps to promote neurite outgrowth (2). In osteoblasts, interaction of α-actinin with integrins stabilizes focal adhesions and may protect cells from apoptosis (3). The cytoskeletal α-actinin isoforms 1 and 4 (ACTN1, ACTN4) are non-muscle proteins that are present in stress fibers, sites of adhesion and intercellular contacts, filopodia, and lamellipodia. The muscle isoforms 2 and 3 (ACTN2, ACTN3) localize to the Z-discs of striated muscle and to dense bodies and plaques in smooth muscle (1).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: TDP43 (TAR DNA-binding protein 43) is involved in transcriptional regulation and exon splicing (1,2). While normal TDP43 is a nuclear protein, pathological TDP43 is a component of insoluble aggregates in patients with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). In these disorders, TDP43 is abnormally ubiquitinated, phosphorylated and cleaved to generate carboxy-terminal fragments that are sequestered as insoluble aggregates in neuronal nuclei, perikarya, and neurites (3,4). Additionally, TDP43 inhibits the expression of the HIV-1 gene and regulates CFTR gene splicing (1,5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: LIN28A and LIN28B are conserved, developmentally regulated RNA binding proteins that inhibit the processing and maturation of the let-7 family of miRNAs (1,2). The let-7 miRNAs have been implicated in repression of oncogenes such as Ras, Myc, and HMGA2 (3). It has recently been shown that upregulation of LIN28A and LIN28B in primary human tumors and human cancer cell lines is correlated with downregulation of let-7 miRNAs (4). LIN28 genes are reported to be involved in primordial germ cell development and germ cell malignancy (5). In addition, allelic variation in LIN28B is associated with regulating the timing of puberty in humans (6). Overexpression of LIN28A, in conjunction with Oct-4, Sox2, and Nanog, can reprogram human fibroblasts to pluripotent, ES-like cells (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Fragile X syndrome, a frequent cause of inherited mental retardation, often results from expansion of the CGG trinucleotide repeat in the gene that encodes the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) (1). FMRP (also known as FMR1) and its two autosomal homologs (FXR1 and FXR2) all bind RNA and play a role in the pathogenesis of fragile X syndrome (1-3). Each of these related proteins can associate with one another as well as form homodimers (3). FMRP can act as a translation regulator and is a component of RNAi effector complexes (RISC), suggesting a role in gene silencing (4). In Drosophila, dFMRP associates with Argonaute 2 (Ago2) and Dicer and coimmunoprecipitates with miRNA and siRNA. These results suggest that fragile X syndrome is related to abnormal translation caused by a defect in RNAi-related pathways (5). In addition, FMRP, FXR1, and FXR2 are components of stress granules (SG) and have been implicated in the translational regulation of mRNAs (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, D. melanogaster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: microtubules, microfilaments (actin filaments), and intermediate filaments. Globular tubulin subunits comprise the microtubule building block, with α/β-tubulin heterodimers forming the tubulin subunit common to all eukaryotic cells. γ-tubulin is required to nucleate polymerization of tubulin subunits to form microtubule polymers. Many cell movements are mediated by microtubule action, including the beating of cilia and flagella, cytoplasmic transport of membrane vesicles, chromosome alignment during meiosis/mitosis, and nerve-cell axon migration. These movements result from competitive microtubule polymerization and depolymerization or through the actions of microtubule motor proteins (1).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: The ezrin, radixin, and moesin (ERM) proteins function as linkers between the plasma membrane and the actin cytoskeleton and are involved in cell adhesion, membrane ruffling, and microvilli formation (1). ERM proteins undergo intra or intermolecular interaction between their amino- and carboxy-terminal domains, existing as inactive cytosolic monomers or dimers (2). Phosphorylation at a carboxy-terminal threonine residue (Thr567 of ezrin, Thr564 of radixin, Thr558 of moesin) disrupts the amino- and carboxy-terminal association and may play a key role in regulating ERM protein conformation and function (3,4). Phosphorylation at Thr567 of ezrin is required for cytoskeletal rearrangements and oncogene-induced transformation (5). Ezrin is also phosphorylated at tyrosine residues upon growth factor stimulation. Phosphorylation of Tyr353 of ezrin transmits a survival signal during epithelial differentiation (6).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Nucleophosmin (NPM; also known as B23, numatrin or NO38) is an abundant phosphoprotein primarily found in nucleoli. It has been implicated in several distinct cellular functions, including assembly and transport of ribosomes, cytoplasmic/nuclear trafficking, regulation of DNA polymerase α activity, centrosome duplication and molecular chaperoning activities (1,2). The NPM gene is also known for its fusion with the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) receptor tyrosine kinase. The NPM portion contributes to transformation by providing a dimerization domain, which results in activation of the fused kinase (3,4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
D. melanogaster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: In both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells the misfolding and aggregation of proteins during biogenesis and under conditions of cellular stress are prevented by molecular chaperones (1-3). HSP60 has primarily been known as a mitochondrial protein that is important for folding key proteins after import into the mitochondria (4). Research studies have shown that a significant amount of HSP60 is also present in the cytosol of many cells, and that it is induced by stress, inflammatory and immune responses, and autoantibodies correlated with Alzheimer's, coronary artery diseases, MS, and diabetes (5-8).