Microsize antibodies for $99 | Learn More >>

Polyclonal Antibody Immunohistochemistry Paraffin Microtubule Polymerization

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Hamster, Human, Mouse, Pig, Rat, Zebrafish

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The 21-24 kDa integral proteins, caveolins, are the principal structural components of the cholesterol/sphingolipid-enriched plasma membrane microdomain caveolae. Three members of the caveolin family (caveolin-1, -2, and -3) have been identified with different tissue distributions. Caveolins form hetero- and homo-oligomers that interact with cholesterol and other lipids (1). Caveolins are involved in diverse biological functions, including vesicular trafficking, cholesterol homeostasis, cell adhesion, and apoptosis, and are also implicated in neurodegenerative disease (2). Caveolins interact with multiple signaling molecules such as Gα subunit, tyrosine kinase receptors, PKCs, Src family tyrosine kinases, and eNOS (1,2). It is believed that caveolins serve as scaffolding proteins for the integration of signal transduction. Phosphorylation at Tyr14 is essential for caveolin association with SH2 or PTB domain-containing adaptor proteins such as GRB7 (3-5). Phosphorylation at Ser80 regulates caveolin binding to the ER membrane and entry into the secretory pathway (6).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Stathmin is a ubiquitously expressed microtubule destabilizing phosphoprotein that is upregulated in a number of cancers. The amino terminus of the protein contains multiple phosphorylation sites and is involved in the promotion of tubulin filament depolymerization. Phosphorylation at these sites inactivates the protein and stabilizes microtubules. Ser16 phosphorylation by CaM kinases II and IV (1,2) increases during G2/M-phase and is involved in mitotic spindle regulation (3,4). Ser38 is a target for cdc2 kinase (5) and TNF-induced cell death gives rise to reactive oxygen intermediates leading to hyperphosphorylation of stathmin (6). EGF receptor activation of Rac and cdc42 also increases phosphorylation of stathmin on Ser16 and Ser38 (7). Other closely related family members are neuronally expressed and include SCG10, SCLIP, RB3 and its splice variants RB3' and RB3''. Stathmin and SCG10 have been shown to play roles in neuronal-like development in PC-12 cells (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat, Zebrafish

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: microtubules, microfilaments (actin filaments), and intermediate filaments. Globular tubulin subunits comprise the microtubule building block, with α/β-tubulin heterodimers forming the tubulin subunit common to all eukaryotic cells. γ-tubulin is required to nucleate polymerization of tubulin subunits to form microtubule polymers. Many cell movements are mediated by microtubule action, including the beating of cilia and flagella, cytoplasmic transport of membrane vesicles, chromosome alignment during meiosis/mitosis, and nerve-cell axon migration. These movements result from competitive microtubule polymerization and depolymerization or through the actions of microtubule motor proteins (1).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, D. melanogaster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: microtubules, microfilaments (actin filaments), and intermediate filaments. Globular tubulin subunits comprise the microtubule building block, with α/β-tubulin heterodimers forming the tubulin subunit common to all eukaryotic cells. γ-tubulin is required to nucleate polymerization of tubulin subunits to form microtubule polymers. Many cell movements are mediated by microtubule action, including the beating of cilia and flagella, cytoplasmic transport of membrane vesicles, chromosome alignment during meiosis/mitosis, and nerve-cell axon migration. These movements result from competitive microtubule polymerization and depolymerization or through the actions of microtubule motor proteins (1).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat, Zebrafish

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: microtubules, microfilaments (actin filaments), and intermediate filaments. Globular tubulin subunits comprise the microtubule building block, with α/β-tubulin heterodimers forming the tubulin subunit common to all eukaryotic cells. γ-tubulin is required to nucleate polymerization of tubulin subunits to form microtubule polymers. Many cell movements are mediated by microtubule action, including the beating of cilia and flagella, cytoplasmic transport of membrane vesicles, chromosome alignment during meiosis/mitosis, and nerve-cell axon migration. These movements result from competitive microtubule polymerization and depolymerization or through the actions of microtubule motor proteins (1).