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Polyclonal Antibody Ubiquitin Activating Enzyme Activity

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Ubiquitin can be covalently linked to many cellular proteins by the ubiquitination process, which targets proteins for degradation by the 26S proteasome. Three components are involved in the target protein-ubiquitin conjugation process. Ubiquitin is first activated by forming a thiolester complex with the ubiquitin-activating enzyme (UBE1 or E1). The activated ubiquitin is subsequently transferred to the ubiquitin-carrier protein E2, and then from E2 to ubiquitin ligase E3 for final delivery to the ε-amino group of the target protein lysine residue (1-3). Combinatorial interactions of different E2 and E3 proteins result in substrate specificity (4). UBE1 has two isofoms: UBE1a is a nuclear protein of 117 kDa while UBE1b is a nuclear and cytoplasmic protein of 110 kDa (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Ubiquitin can be covalently linked to many cellular proteins by the ubiquitination process, which targets proteins for degradation by the 26S proteasome. Three components are involved in the target protein-ubiquitin conjugation process. Ubiquitin is first activated by forming a thiolester complex with the ubiquitin-activating enzyme (UBE1 or E1). The activated ubiquitin is subsequently transferred to the ubiquitin-carrier protein E2, and then from E2 to ubiquitin ligase E3 for final delivery to the ε-amino group of the target protein lysine residue (1-3). Combinatorial interactions of different E2 and E3 proteins result in substrate specificity (4). UBE1 has two isofoms: UBE1a is a nuclear protein of 117 kDa while UBE1b is a nuclear and cytoplasmic protein of 110 kDa (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Ubiquitin can be covalently linked to many cellular proteins by the ubiquitination process, which targets proteins for degradation by the 26S proteasome. Three components are involved in the target protein-ubiquitin conjugation process. Ubiquitin is first activated by forming a thioester complex with the ubiquitin-activating enzyme (E1). The activated ubiquitin is subsequently transferred to the ubiquitin-carrier protein E2, and then from E2 to ubiquitin ligase E3 for final delivery to the ε-amino group of the target protein lysine residue (1-3).Ubiquitin-activating enzyme E1-like protein 2/Ubiquitin-like modifier-activating enzyme 6 (UBE1L2/UBA6) is ubiquitously expressed in human tissues and functions as an E1 enzyme related to UBE1/UBA1 (40% identity at the protein level). UBE1L2/UBA6 activates both ubiquitin and the ubiquitin-like protein FAT10 through a similar ATP dependent mechanism (4-6). Like other E1 protein family members, UBE1L2/UBA6 contains a conserved ATP-binding adenylation domain and an active site cysteine residue that are critical for enzymatic function (4,5). Research studies have demonstrated that UBE1L2/UBA6 expression is essential during the early stages of embryogenesis in mice (4). Furthermore, loss of neuronal UBE1L2/UBA6 expression promotes significant defects in neuronal structure and function, which contributes to a reduction in body weight and decreased postnatal viability (7).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Autophagy is a catabolic process for the autophagosomic-lysosomal degradation of bulk cytoplasmic contents (1,2). Autophagy is generally activated by conditions of nutrient deprivation but has also been associated with a number of physiological processes including development, differentiation, neurodegeneration, infection, and cancer (3). The molecular machinery of autophagy was largely discovered in yeast and referred to as autophagy-related (Atg) genes. Formation of the autophagosome involves a ubiquitin-like conjugation system in which Atg12 is covalently bound to Atg5 and targeted to autophagosome vesicles (4-6). This conjugation reaction is mediated by the ubiquitin E1-like enzyme Atg7 and the E2-like enzyme Atg10 (7,8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The process of SUMO conjugation to target proteins is similar to the molecular chain of events observed with ubiquitin (1). SUMO is conjugated to target proteins through the coordinated action of the cellular SUMO conjugation machinery, which consists of the E1, E2, and E3 enzymes (2). The canonical SUMO E1 activating enzyme is a heterodimer consisting of Ubiquitin-like 1-activating enzyme E1A (UBLE1A, SAE1) and UBLE1B (SAE2, UBA2) subunits. Mature SUMO is activated by E1 in an ATP-dependent reaction that generates adenylated SUMO, which functions as a high-energy intermediate in the formation of a thioester linkage between SUMO and Cys173 of SAE2 (3,4). SUMO is subsequently transferred from SAE2 to the SUMO E2 conjugating enzyme UBE2I (5). Research studies indicate that UBLE1A (SAE1) is a nuclear protein and c-Myc transcriptional target whose expression is required for Myc-driven tumorigenesis (6-8).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) is one of the earliest events in a cascade that controls a variety of cellular responses, including secretion, gene expression, proliferation, and muscle contraction (1,2). PKC isoforms belong to three groups based on calcium dependency and activators. Classical PKCs are calcium-dependent via their C2 domains and are activated by phosphatidylserine (PS), diacylglycerol (DAG), and phorbol esters (TPA, PMA) through their cysteine-rich C1 domains. Both novel and atypical PKCs are calcium-independent, but only novel PKCs are activated by PS, DAG, and phorbol esters (3-5). Members of these three PKC groups contain a pseudo-substrate or autoinhibitory domain that binds to substrate-binding sites in the catalytic domain to prevent activation in the absence of cofactors or activators. Control of PKC activity is regulated through three distinct phosphorylation events. Phosphorylation occurs in vivo at Thr500 in the activation loop, at Thr641 through autophosphorylation, and at the carboxy-terminal hydrophobic site Ser660 (2). Atypical PKC isoforms lack hydrophobic region phosphorylation, which correlates with the presence of glutamic acid rather than the serine or threonine residues found in more typical PKC isoforms. The enzyme PDK1 or a close relative is responsible for PKC activation. A recent addition to the PKC superfamily is PKCμ (PKD), which is regulated by DAG and TPA through its C1 domain. PKD is distinguished by the presence of a PH domain and by its unique substrate recognition and Golgi localization (6). PKC-related kinases (PRK) lack the C1 domain and do not respond to DAG or phorbol esters. Phosphatidylinositol lipids activate PRKs, and small Rho-family GTPases bind to the homology region 1 (HR1) to regulate PRK kinase activity (7).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) is one of the earliest events in a cascade that controls a variety of cellular responses, including secretion, gene expression, proliferation, and muscle contraction (1,2). PKC isoforms belong to three groups based on calcium dependency and activators. Classical PKCs are calcium-dependent via their C2 domains and are activated by phosphatidylserine (PS), diacylglycerol (DAG), and phorbol esters (TPA, PMA) through their cysteine-rich C1 domains. Both novel and atypical PKCs are calcium-independent, but only novel PKCs are activated by PS, DAG, and phorbol esters (3-5). Members of these three PKC groups contain a pseudo-substrate or autoinhibitory domain that binds to substrate-binding sites in the catalytic domain to prevent activation in the absence of cofactors or activators. Control of PKC activity is regulated through three distinct phosphorylation events. Phosphorylation occurs in vivo at Thr500 in the activation loop, at Thr641 through autophosphorylation, and at the carboxy-terminal hydrophobic site Ser660 (2). Atypical PKC isoforms lack hydrophobic region phosphorylation, which correlates with the presence of glutamic acid rather than the serine or threonine residues found in more typical PKC isoforms. The enzyme PDK1 or a close relative is responsible for PKC activation. A recent addition to the PKC superfamily is PKCμ (PKD), which is regulated by DAG and TPA through its C1 domain. PKD is distinguished by the presence of a PH domain and by its unique substrate recognition and Golgi localization (6). PKC-related kinases (PRK) lack the C1 domain and do not respond to DAG or phorbol esters. Phosphatidylinositol lipids activate PRKs, and small Rho-family GTPases bind to the homology region 1 (HR1) to regulate PRK kinase activity (7).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat, Xenopus

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) is one of the earliest events in a cascade that controls a variety of cellular responses, including secretion, gene expression, proliferation, and muscle contraction (1,2). PKC isoforms belong to three groups based on calcium dependency and activators. Classical PKCs are calcium-dependent via their C2 domains and are activated by phosphatidylserine (PS), diacylglycerol (DAG), and phorbol esters (TPA, PMA) through their cysteine-rich C1 domains. Both novel and atypical PKCs are calcium-independent, but only novel PKCs are activated by PS, DAG, and phorbol esters (3-5). Members of these three PKC groups contain a pseudo-substrate or autoinhibitory domain that binds to substrate-binding sites in the catalytic domain to prevent activation in the absence of cofactors or activators. Control of PKC activity is regulated through three distinct phosphorylation events. Phosphorylation occurs in vivo at Thr500 in the activation loop, at Thr641 through autophosphorylation, and at the carboxy-terminal hydrophobic site Ser660 (2). Atypical PKC isoforms lack hydrophobic region phosphorylation, which correlates with the presence of glutamic acid rather than the serine or threonine residues found in more typical PKC isoforms. The enzyme PDK1 or a close relative is responsible for PKC activation. A recent addition to the PKC superfamily is PKCμ (PKD), which is regulated by DAG and TPA through its C1 domain. PKD is distinguished by the presence of a PH domain and by its unique substrate recognition and Golgi localization (6). PKC-related kinases (PRK) lack the C1 domain and do not respond to DAG or phorbol esters. Phosphatidylinositol lipids activate PRKs, and small Rho-family GTPases bind to the homology region 1 (HR1) to regulate PRK kinase activity (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The process of SUMO-1 conjugation is similar to that seen with ubiquitin and other forms of post-translational protein modification (1). Like ubiquitin, SUMO-1 is conjugated to its target protein by the coordinated action of ubiquitin conjugation enzymes E1, E2 and E3 (2). Ubc9 (or ube2M) is a highly conserved, 158 amino acid protein that acts as a SUMO-1 conjugating enzyme (3). Ubc9 binds to target proteins through their SUMO-1-CS (consensus sequence) domains and interacts with SUMO via the structurally conserved amino-terminal domain (3,4). Localization of Ubc9 to the nucleus and the nuclear envelope allows this enzyme to catalyze target protein sumoylation and regulate target protein nucleocytoplasmic transport and transcriptional activity (5,6). Ubc9 target proteins include a host of proteins (RAD51, RAD52, p53 and c-Jun) that regulate the cell cycle, DNA repair, and p53-dependent processes (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Protein ubiquitination requires the concerted action of the E1, E2, and E3 ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes. Ubiquitin is first activated through ATP-dependent formation of a thiol ester with ubiquitin-activating enzyme E1. The activated ubiquitin is then transferred to a thiol group of ubiquitin-carrier enzyme E2. The final step is the transfer of ubiquitin from E2 to an ε-amino group of the target protein lysine residue, which is mediated by ubiquitin-ligase enzyme E3 (1).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) protein is a substrate recognition component of an E3 ubiquitin ligase complex containing elongin BC (TCEB1 and TCEB2), cullin 1 (CUL1), and RING-box protein 1 (RBX1) (1,2,3). VHL protein has been shown to exist as three distinct isoforms resulting from alternatively spliced transcript variants (4). Loss of VHL protein function results in a dominantly inherited familial cancer syndrome that manifests as angiomas of the retina, hemangioblastomas of the central nervous system, renal clear-cell carcinomas, and pheochromocytomas (4). Under normoxic conditions, VHL directs the ubiquitylation and subsequent proteosomal degradation of the hypoxia inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α), maintaining very low levels of HIF-1α in the cell. Cellular exposure to hypoxic conditions, or loss of VHL protein function, results in increased HIF-1α protein levels and increased expression of HIF-induced gene products, many of which are angiogenesis factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Thus, loss of VHL protein function is believed to contribute to the formation of highly vascular neoplasias (4). In addition to HIF-1α, VHL is known to regulate the ubiquitylation of several other proteins, including tat-binding protein 1 (TBP-1), the atypical protein kinase C lambda (aPKC), and two subunits of the multiprotein RNA Polymerase II complex (RPB1 and RPB7) (5,6,7,8). Interactions with elongin BC, RPB1, RPB7 and the pVHL-associated KRAB-A domain containing protein (VHLaK) suggest that VHL may also play a more direct role in transcriptional repression.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase ARIH2 (TRIAD1) is an Ariadne subfamily ligase involved in the polyubiquitination of proteins designated for proteasomal degradation. The TRIAD1 nuclear protein contains an amino-terminal acidic region, a pair of RING fingers, two carboxyl-terminal coiled coil domains and a novel C6HC DRIL/IBR domain located between the RING fingers. Together, the paired RING fingers and DRIL/IBR domain form a highly conserved TRIAD (two RING fingers and DRIL) domain (1). Research studies suggest that TRIAD1 mediates both Lys48 and Lys63 protein polyubiquitination and acts as a negative regulator of myelopoiesis. TRIAD1 ubiquitin ligase inhibits myeloid cell proliferation by mediating protein ubiquitination through the ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes UbcH7 and UbcH13 (2,3). Experimental deletion of TRIAD1 in mice has a lethal effect, leading to death at the embryonic stage or later due to a severe, multi-organ inflammatory response. Results indicate that TRIAD1 binds IκBβ in dendritic cells and promotes the degradation of the NF-κB inhibitor (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Parkin is a protein of 465 amino acids with an amino-terminal ubiquitin domain and a carboxy-terminal RING-box (1). In the case of autosomal recessive juvenile Parkinsonism (AR-JP), deletions have been found in the gene on chromosome 6 encoding the protein Parkin (2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Members of the Toll-like receptor (TLR) family, named for the closely related Toll receptor in Drosophila, play a pivotal role in innate immune responses (1-4). TLRs recognize conserved motifs found in various pathogens and mediate defense responses (5-7). Triggering of the TLR pathway leads to the activation of NF-κB and subsequent regulation of immune and inflammatory genes (4). The TLRs and members of the IL-1 receptor family share a conserved stretch of approximately 200 amino acids known as the Toll/Interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain (1). Upon activation, TLRs associate with a number of cytoplasmic adaptor proteins containing TIR domains, including myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88), MyD88-adaptor-like/TIR-associated protein (MAL/TIRAP), Toll-receptor-associated activator of interferon (TRIF), and Toll-receptor-associated molecule (TRAM) (8-10). This association leads to the recruitment and activation of IRAK1 and IRAK4, which form a complex with TRAF6 to activate TAK1 and IKK (8,11-14). Activation of IKK leads to the degradation of IκB, which normally maintains NF-κB in an inactive state by sequestering it in the cytoplasm.

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: MDM2, a ubiquitin ligase for p53, plays a central role in regulation of the stability of p53 (1). Akt-mediated phosphorylation of MDM2 at Ser166 and Ser186 increases its interaction with p300, allowing MDM2-mediated ubiquitination and degradation of p53 (2-4). Phosphorylation of MDM2 also blocks its binding to p19ARF, increasing the degradation of p53 (3).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The breast cancer susceptibility proteins BRCA1 and BRCA2 are frequently mutated in cases of hereditary breast and ovarian cancers and have roles in multiple processes related to DNA damage, repair, cell cycle progression, transcription, ubiquitination, and apoptosis (1-4). BRCA2 has been shown to be required for localization of Rad51 to sites of double stranded breaks (DSBs) in DNA, and cells lacking BRCA1 and BRCA2 cannot repair DSBs through the Rad51-dependent process of homologous recombination (HR) (5). Numerous DNA damage-induced phosphorylation sites on BRCA1 have been identified, including Ser988, 1189, 1387, 1423, 1457, 1524, and 1542, and kinases activated in a cell cycle-dependent manner, including Aurora A and CDK2, can also phosphorylate BRCA1 at Ser308 and Ser1497, respectively (6-10). Cell cycle-dependent phosphorylation of BRCA2 at Ser3291 by CDKs has been proposed as a mechanism to switch off HR as cells progress beyond S-phase by blocking the carboxy terminal Rad51 binding site (11).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The breast cancer susceptibility proteins BRCA1 and BRCA2 are frequently mutated in cases of hereditary breast and ovarian cancers and have roles in multiple processes related to DNA damage, repair, cell cycle progression, transcription, ubiquitination, and apoptosis (1-4). BRCA2 has been shown to be required for localization of Rad51 to sites of double stranded breaks (DSBs) in DNA, and cells lacking BRCA1 and BRCA2 cannot repair DSBs through the Rad51-dependent process of homologous recombination (HR) (5). Numerous DNA damage-induced phosphorylation sites on BRCA1 have been identified, including Ser988, 1189, 1387, 1423, 1457, 1524, and 1542, and kinases activated in a cell cycle-dependent manner, including Aurora A and CDK2, can also phosphorylate BRCA1 at Ser308 and Ser1497, respectively (6-10). Cell cycle-dependent phosphorylation of BRCA2 at Ser3291 by CDKs has been proposed as a mechanism to switch off HR as cells progress beyond S-phase by blocking the carboxy terminal Rad51 binding site (11).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: HSP70 and HSP90 are molecular chaperones expressed constitutively under normal conditions to maintain protein homeostasis and are induced upon environmental stress (1). Both HSP70 and HSP90 are able to interact with unfolded proteins to prevent irreversible aggregation and catalyze the refolding of their substrates in an ATP- and co-chaperone-dependent manner (1). HSP70 has a broad range of substrates including newly synthesized and denatured proteins, while HSP90 tends to have a more limited subset of substrates, most of which are signaling molecules. HSP70 and HSP90 often function collaboratively in a multi-chaperone system, which requires a minimal set of co-chaperones: HSP40, Hop, and p23 (2,3). The co-chaperones either regulate the intrinsic ATPase activity of the chaperones or recruit chaperones to specific substrates or subcellular compartments (1,4). When the ubiquitin ligase CHIP associates with the HSP70/HSP90 complex as a cofactor, the unfolded substrates are subjected to degradation by the proteasome (4). The biological functions of HSP70/HSP90 extend beyond their chaperone activity. They are essential for the maturation and inactivation of nuclear hormones and other signaling molecules (1,3). They also play a role in vesicle formation and protein trafficking (2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: HSP70 and HSP90 are molecular chaperones expressed constitutively under normal conditions to maintain protein homeostasis and are induced upon environmental stress (1). Both HSP70 and HSP90 are able to interact with unfolded proteins to prevent irreversible aggregation and catalyze the refolding of their substrates in an ATP- and co-chaperone-dependent manner (1). HSP70 has a broad range of substrates including newly synthesized and denatured proteins, while HSP90 tends to have a more limited subset of substrates, most of which are signaling molecules. HSP70 and HSP90 often function collaboratively in a multi-chaperone system, which requires a minimal set of co-chaperones: HSP40, Hop, and p23 (2,3). The co-chaperones either regulate the intrinsic ATPase activity of the chaperones or recruit chaperones to specific substrates or subcellular compartments (1,4). When the ubiquitin ligase CHIP associates with the HSP70/HSP90 complex as a cofactor, the unfolded substrates are subjected to degradation by the proteasome (4). The biological functions of HSP70/HSP90 extend beyond their chaperone activity. They are essential for the maturation and inactivation of nuclear hormones and other signaling molecules (1,3). They also play a role in vesicle formation and protein trafficking (2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Pig, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The 14-3-3 family of proteins plays a key regulatory role in signal transduction, checkpoint control, apoptotic and nutrient-sensing pathways (1,2). 14-3-3 proteins are highly conserved and ubiquitously expressed. There are at least seven isoforms, β, γ, ε, σ, ζ, τ, and η that have been identified in mammals. The initially described α and δ isoforms are confirmed to be phosphorylated forms of β and ζ, respectively (3). Through their amino-terminal α helical region, 14-3-3 proteins form homo- or heterodimers that interact with a wide variety of proteins: transcription factors, metabolic enzymes, cytoskeletal proteins, kinases, phosphatases, and other signaling molecules (3,4). The interaction of 14-3-3 proteins with their targets is primarily through a phospho-Ser/Thr motif. However, binding to divergent phospho-Ser/Thr motifs, as well as phosphorylation independent interactions has been observed (4). 14-3-3 binding masks specific sequences of the target protein, and therefore, modulates target protein localization, phosphorylation state, stability, and molecular interactions (1-4). 14-3-3 proteins may also induce target protein conformational changes that modify target protein function (4,5). Distinct temporal and spatial expression patterns of 14-3-3 isoforms have been observed in development and in acute response to extracellular signals and drugs, suggesting that 14-3-3 isoforms may perform different functions despite their sequence similarities (4). Several studies suggest that 14-3-3 isoforms are differentially regulated in cancer and neurological syndromes (2,3).