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Rat Dna Damage Response

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Damaged DNA-Binding Protein (DDB) consists of a 127 kDa subunit (DDB-1) and a 48 kDa subunit (DDB-2) that contribute to the formation of the UV-damaged DNA-binding protein complex (UV-DDB) (1-3). In conjunction with CUL4A and ROC-1, the UV-DDB complex forms an E3 ubiquitin ligase that recognizes a broad spectrum of DNA lesions such as cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers, 6-4 photoproducts, apurinic sites and short mismatches. The complex polyubiquitinates components of the nucleotide excision repair pathway (4-6). Loss of DDB activity has been identified in a subset of xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group E (XP-E) patients and has been linked to the deficient repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in cells derived from these patients (7-10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: GADD45 α, β and γ are an evolutionarily conserved, homologous family of nuclear proteins that function as stress sensors for cellular physiological and environmental damage. GADD45 proteins are required for the activation of the G2/M checkpoint induced by UV radiation or alkylating agents (1). GADD45-induced G2/M checkpoint is regulated through inactivation of Cdc2-cyclin B1 kinase (2). GADD45 forms a complex with p21 and Cdc2, and may serve as core for interaction with other cell cycle regulators (3,4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Damaged DNA-Binding Protein (DDB) consists of a 127 kDa subunit (DDB-1) and a 48 kDa subunit (DDB-2) that contribute to the formation of the UV-damaged DNA-binding protein complex (UV-DDB) (1-3). In conjunction with CUL4A and ROC-1, the UV-DDB complex forms an E3 ubiquitin ligase that recognizes a broad spectrum of DNA lesions such as cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers, 6-4 photoproducts, apurinic sites and short mismatches. The complex polyubiquitinates components of the nucleotide excision repair pathway (4-6). Loss of DDB activity has been identified in a subset of xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group E (XP-E) patients and has been linked to the deficient repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in cells derived from these patients (7-10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: RPA70 (HSSB, REPA1, RF-A, RP-A, p70) is a component of a heterotrimeric complex, composed of 70, 32/30 and 14 kDa subunits, collectively known as RPA. RPA is a single stranded DNA binding protein, whose DNA binding activity is believed to reside entirely in the 70 kDa subunit. The complex is required for almost all aspects of cellular DNA metabolism such as DNA replication (1-3), recombination, cell cycle and DNA damage checkpoints, and all major types of DNA repair including nucleotide excision, base excision, mismatch and double-strand break repairs (4-7). In response to genotoxic stress in eukaryotic cells, RPA has been shown to associate with the Rad9/Rad1/Hus1 (9-1-1) checkpoint complex (8). RPA is hyperphosphorylated upon DNA damage or replication stress by checkpoint kinases including ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), ATM and Rad3-related (ATR), and DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) (9-11). Phosphorylation of RPA32 occurs at serines 4, 8 and 33 (11). Hyperphosphorylation may alter RPA-DNA and RPA-protein interactions. In addition to the checkpoint partners, RPA interacts with a wide variety of protein partners, including proteins required for normal replication such as RCF, PCNA and Pol α, and also proteins involved in SV40 replication, such as DNA polymerase I and SV40 large T antigen (10,12).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 488 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry and immunofluorescent analysis in human and mouse cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated p53 (1C12) Mouse mAb #2524.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: The p53 tumor suppressor protein plays a major role in cellular response to DNA damage and other genomic aberrations. Activation of p53 can lead to either cell cycle arrest and DNA repair or apoptosis (1). p53 is phosphorylated at multiple sites in vivo and by several different protein kinases in vitro (2,3). DNA damage induces phosphorylation of p53 at Ser15 and Ser20 and leads to a reduced interaction between p53 and its negative regulator, the oncoprotein MDM2 (4). MDM2 inhibits p53 accumulation by targeting it for ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation (5,6). p53 can be phosphorylated by ATM, ATR, and DNA-PK at Ser15 and Ser37. Phosphorylation impairs the ability of MDM2 to bind p53, promoting both the accumulation and activation of p53 in response to DNA damage (4,7). Chk2 and Chk1 can phosphorylate p53 at Ser20, enhancing its tetramerization, stability, and activity (8,9). p53 is phosphorylated at Ser392 in vivo (10,11) and by CAK in vitro (11). Phosphorylation of p53 at Ser392 is increased in human tumors (12) and has been reported to influence the growth suppressor function, DNA binding, and transcriptional activation of p53 (10,13,14). p53 is phosphorylated at Ser6 and Ser9 by CK1δ and CK1ε both in vitro and in vivo (13,15). Phosphorylation of p53 at Ser46 regulates the ability of p53 to induce apoptosis (16). Acetylation of p53 is mediated by p300 and CBP acetyltransferases. Inhibition of deacetylation suppressing MDM2 from recruiting HDAC1 complex by p19 (ARF) stabilizes p53. Acetylation appears to play a positive role in the accumulation of p53 protein in stress response (17). Following DNA damage, human p53 becomes acetylated at Lys382 (Lys379 in mouse) in vivo to enhance p53-DNA binding (18). Deacetylation of p53 occurs through interaction with the SIRT1 protein, a deacetylase that may be involved in cellular aging and the DNA damage response (19).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: RPA70 (HSSB, REPA1, RF-A, RP-A, p70) is a component of a heterotrimeric complex, composed of 70, 32/30 and 14 kDa subunits, collectively known as RPA. RPA is a single stranded DNA binding protein, whose DNA binding activity is believed to reside entirely in the 70 kDa subunit. The complex is required for almost all aspects of cellular DNA metabolism such as DNA replication (1-3), recombination, cell cycle and DNA damage checkpoints, and all major types of DNA repair including nucleotide excision, base excision, mismatch and double-strand break repairs (4-7). In response to genotoxic stress in eukaryotic cells, RPA has been shown to associate with the Rad9/Rad1/Hus1 (9-1-1) checkpoint complex (8). RPA is hyperphosphorylated upon DNA damage or replication stress by checkpoint kinases including ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), ATM and Rad3-related (ATR), and DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) (9-11). Phosphorylation of RPA32 occurs at serines 4, 8 and 33 (11). Hyperphosphorylation may alter RPA-DNA and RPA-protein interactions. In addition to the checkpoint partners, RPA interacts with a wide variety of protein partners, including proteins required for normal replication such as RCF, PCNA and Pol α, and also proteins involved in SV40 replication, such as DNA polymerase I and SV40 large T antigen (10,12).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The p53 tumor suppressor protein plays a major role in cellular response to DNA damage and other genomic aberrations. Activation of p53 can lead to either cell cycle arrest and DNA repair or apoptosis (1). p53 is phosphorylated at multiple sites in vivo and by several different protein kinases in vitro (2,3). DNA damage induces phosphorylation of p53 at Ser15 and Ser20 and leads to a reduced interaction between p53 and its negative regulator, the oncoprotein MDM2 (4). MDM2 inhibits p53 accumulation by targeting it for ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation (5,6). p53 can be phosphorylated by ATM, ATR, and DNA-PK at Ser15 and Ser37. Phosphorylation impairs the ability of MDM2 to bind p53, promoting both the accumulation and activation of p53 in response to DNA damage (4,7). Chk2 and Chk1 can phosphorylate p53 at Ser20, enhancing its tetramerization, stability, and activity (8,9). p53 is phosphorylated at Ser392 in vivo (10,11) and by CAK in vitro (11). Phosphorylation of p53 at Ser392 is increased in human tumors (12) and has been reported to influence the growth suppressor function, DNA binding, and transcriptional activation of p53 (10,13,14). p53 is phosphorylated at Ser6 and Ser9 by CK1δ and CK1ε both in vitro and in vivo (13,15). Phosphorylation of p53 at Ser46 regulates the ability of p53 to induce apoptosis (16). Acetylation of p53 is mediated by p300 and CBP acetyltransferases. Inhibition of deacetylation suppressing MDM2 from recruiting HDAC1 complex by p19 (ARF) stabilizes p53. Acetylation appears to play a positive role in the accumulation of p53 protein in stress response (17). Following DNA damage, human p53 becomes acetylated at Lys382 (Lys379 in mouse) in vivo to enhance p53-DNA binding (18). Deacetylation of p53 occurs through interaction with the SIRT1 protein, a deacetylase that may be involved in cellular aging and the DNA damage response (19).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mink, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS) is characterized by growth retardation, mental disability, immunodeficiency, defects in cell cycle checkpoints, an increased propensity for cancer, and sensitivity to ionizing radiation (1). Repair of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks is dependent on the multifunctional MRN complex containing Mre11, Rad50, and the NBS1 gene product p95/NBS1 (also called p95 or nibrin) (2). p95/NBS1 is a protein with a forkhead-associated domain and a BRCT repeat that regulate interaction with MDC1 and are essential for proper G2/M DNA-damage checkpoint function (3). NBS1 is critical for homologous recombination following DNA double strand breaks. This activity requires CDK-dependent association with CtIP and subsequent phosphorylation by ATM (4). ATM interacts with and phosphorylates p95/NBS1 at Ser278 and Ser343 after exposure to ionizing radiation (5,6).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
$717
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The p53 tumor suppressor protein plays a major role in cellular response to DNA damage and other genomic aberrations. Activation of p53 can lead to either cell cycle arrest and DNA repair or apoptosis (1). p53 is phosphorylated at multiple sites in vivo and by several different protein kinases in vitro (2,3). DNA damage induces phosphorylation of p53 at Ser15 and Ser20 and leads to a reduced interaction between p53 and its negative regulator, the oncoprotein MDM2 (4). MDM2 inhibits p53 accumulation by targeting it for ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation (5,6). p53 can be phosphorylated by ATM, ATR, and DNA-PK at Ser15 and Ser37. Phosphorylation impairs the ability of MDM2 to bind p53, promoting both the accumulation and activation of p53 in response to DNA damage (4,7). Chk2 and Chk1 can phosphorylate p53 at Ser20, enhancing its tetramerization, stability, and activity (8,9). p53 is phosphorylated at Ser392 in vivo (10,11) and by CAK in vitro (11). Phosphorylation of p53 at Ser392 is increased in human tumors (12) and has been reported to influence the growth suppressor function, DNA binding, and transcriptional activation of p53 (10,13,14). p53 is phosphorylated at Ser6 and Ser9 by CK1δ and CK1ε both in vitro and in vivo (13,15). Phosphorylation of p53 at Ser46 regulates the ability of p53 to induce apoptosis (16). Acetylation of p53 is mediated by p300 and CBP acetyltransferases. Inhibition of deacetylation suppressing MDM2 from recruiting HDAC1 complex by p19 (ARF) stabilizes p53. Acetylation appears to play a positive role in the accumulation of p53 protein in stress response (17). Following DNA damage, human p53 becomes acetylated at Lys382 (Lys379 in mouse) in vivo to enhance p53-DNA binding (18). Deacetylation of p53 occurs through interaction with the SIRT1 protein, a deacetylase that may be involved in cellular aging and the DNA damage response (19).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS) is characterized by growth retardation, mental disability, immunodeficiency, defects in cell cycle checkpoints, an increased propensity for cancer, and sensitivity to ionizing radiation (1). Repair of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks is dependent on the multifunctional MRN complex containing Mre11, Rad50, and the NBS1 gene product p95/NBS1 (also called p95 or nibrin) (2). p95/NBS1 is a protein with a forkhead-associated domain and a BRCT repeat that regulate interaction with MDC1 and are essential for proper G2/M DNA-damage checkpoint function (3). NBS1 is critical for homologous recombination following DNA double strand breaks. This activity requires CDK-dependent association with CtIP and subsequent phosphorylation by ATM (4). ATM interacts with and phosphorylates p95/NBS1 at Ser278 and Ser343 after exposure to ionizing radiation (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: RPA70 (HSSB, REPA1, RF-A, RP-A, p70) is a component of a heterotrimeric complex, composed of 70, 32/30 and 14 kDa subunits, collectively known as RPA. RPA is a single stranded DNA binding protein, whose DNA binding activity is believed to reside entirely in the 70 kDa subunit. The complex is required for almost all aspects of cellular DNA metabolism such as DNA replication (1-3), recombination, cell cycle and DNA damage checkpoints, and all major types of DNA repair including nucleotide excision, base excision, mismatch and double-strand break repairs (4-7). In response to genotoxic stress in eukaryotic cells, RPA has been shown to associate with the Rad9/Rad1/Hus1 (9-1-1) checkpoint complex (8). RPA is hyperphosphorylated upon DNA damage or replication stress by checkpoint kinases including ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), ATM and Rad3-related (ATR), and DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) (9-11). Phosphorylation of RPA32 occurs at serines 4, 8 and 33 (11). Hyperphosphorylation may alter RPA-DNA and RPA-protein interactions. In addition to the checkpoint partners, RPA interacts with a wide variety of protein partners, including proteins required for normal replication such as RCF, PCNA and Pol α, and also proteins involved in SV40 replication, such as DNA polymerase I and SV40 large T antigen (10,12).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 647 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry and immunofluorescent analysis in human and mouse cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated p53 (1C12) Mouse mAb #2524.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: The p53 tumor suppressor protein plays a major role in cellular response to DNA damage and other genomic aberrations. Activation of p53 can lead to either cell cycle arrest and DNA repair or apoptosis (1). p53 is phosphorylated at multiple sites in vivo and by several different protein kinases in vitro (2,3). DNA damage induces phosphorylation of p53 at Ser15 and Ser20 and leads to a reduced interaction between p53 and its negative regulator, the oncoprotein MDM2 (4). MDM2 inhibits p53 accumulation by targeting it for ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation (5,6). p53 can be phosphorylated by ATM, ATR, and DNA-PK at Ser15 and Ser37. Phosphorylation impairs the ability of MDM2 to bind p53, promoting both the accumulation and activation of p53 in response to DNA damage (4,7). Chk2 and Chk1 can phosphorylate p53 at Ser20, enhancing its tetramerization, stability, and activity (8,9). p53 is phosphorylated at Ser392 in vivo (10,11) and by CAK in vitro (11). Phosphorylation of p53 at Ser392 is increased in human tumors (12) and has been reported to influence the growth suppressor function, DNA binding, and transcriptional activation of p53 (10,13,14). p53 is phosphorylated at Ser6 and Ser9 by CK1δ and CK1ε both in vitro and in vivo (13,15). Phosphorylation of p53 at Ser46 regulates the ability of p53 to induce apoptosis (16). Acetylation of p53 is mediated by p300 and CBP acetyltransferases. Inhibition of deacetylation suppressing MDM2 from recruiting HDAC1 complex by p19 (ARF) stabilizes p53. Acetylation appears to play a positive role in the accumulation of p53 protein in stress response (17). Following DNA damage, human p53 becomes acetylated at Lys382 (Lys379 in mouse) in vivo to enhance p53-DNA binding (18). Deacetylation of p53 occurs through interaction with the SIRT1 protein, a deacetylase that may be involved in cellular aging and the DNA damage response (19).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Chk2 is the mammalian orthologue of the budding yeast Rad53 and fission yeast Cds1 checkpoint kinases (1-3). The amino-terminal domain of Chk2 contains a series of seven serine or threonine residues (Ser19, Thr26, Ser28, Ser33, Ser35, Ser50, and Thr68) each followed by glutamine (SQ or TQ motif). These are known to be preferred sites for phosphorylation by ATM/ATR kinases (4,5). After DNA damage by ionizing radiation (IR), UV irradiation, or hydroxyurea treatment, Thr68 and other sites in this region become phosphorylated by ATM/ATR (5-7). The SQ/TQ cluster domain, therefore, seems to have a regulatory function. Phosphorylation at Thr68 is a prerequisite for the subsequent activation step, which is attributable to autophosphorylation of Chk2 at residues Thr383 and Thr387 in the activation loop of the kinase domain (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The p53 tumor suppressor protein plays a major role in cellular response to DNA damage and other genomic aberrations. Activation of p53 can lead to either cell cycle arrest and DNA repair or apoptosis (1). p53 is phosphorylated at multiple sites in vivo and by several different protein kinases in vitro (2,3). DNA damage induces phosphorylation of p53 at Ser15 and Ser20 and leads to a reduced interaction between p53 and its negative regulator, the oncoprotein MDM2 (4). MDM2 inhibits p53 accumulation by targeting it for ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation (5,6). p53 can be phosphorylated by ATM, ATR, and DNA-PK at Ser15 and Ser37. Phosphorylation impairs the ability of MDM2 to bind p53, promoting both the accumulation and activation of p53 in response to DNA damage (4,7). Chk2 and Chk1 can phosphorylate p53 at Ser20, enhancing its tetramerization, stability, and activity (8,9). p53 is phosphorylated at Ser392 in vivo (10,11) and by CAK in vitro (11). Phosphorylation of p53 at Ser392 is increased in human tumors (12) and has been reported to influence the growth suppressor function, DNA binding, and transcriptional activation of p53 (10,13,14). p53 is phosphorylated at Ser6 and Ser9 by CK1δ and CK1ε both in vitro and in vivo (13,15). Phosphorylation of p53 at Ser46 regulates the ability of p53 to induce apoptosis (16). Acetylation of p53 is mediated by p300 and CBP acetyltransferases. Inhibition of deacetylation suppressing MDM2 from recruiting HDAC1 complex by p19 (ARF) stabilizes p53. Acetylation appears to play a positive role in the accumulation of p53 protein in stress response (17). Following DNA damage, human p53 becomes acetylated at Lys382 (Lys379 in mouse) in vivo to enhance p53-DNA binding (18). Deacetylation of p53 occurs through interaction with the SIRT1 protein, a deacetylase that may be involved in cellular aging and the DNA damage response (19).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Ubiquitin is a conserved polypeptide unit that plays an important role in the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Ubiquitin can be covalently linked to many cellular proteins by the ubiquitination process, which targets proteins for degradation by the 26S proteasome. Three components are involved in the target protein-ubiquitin conjugation process. Ubiquitin is first activated by forming a thiolester complex with the activation component E1; the activated ubiquitin is subsequently transferred to the ubiquitin-carrier protein E2, then from E2 to ubiquitin ligase E3 for final delivery to the epsilon-NH2 of the target protein lysine residue (1-3). The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway has been implicated in a wide range of normal biological processes and in disease-related abnormalities. Several proteins such as IκB, p53, cdc25A, and Bcl-2 have been shown to be targets for the ubiquitin-proteasome process as part of regulation of cell cycle progression, differentiation, cell stress response, and apoptosis (4-7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The 14-3-3 family of proteins plays a key regulatory role in signal transduction, checkpoint control, apoptotic and nutrient-sensing pathways (1,2). 14-3-3 proteins are highly conserved and ubiquitously expressed. There are at least seven isoforms, β, γ, ε, σ, ζ, τ, and η that have been identified in mammals. The initially described α and δ isoforms are confirmed to be phosphorylated forms of β and ζ, respectively (3). Through their amino-terminal α helical region, 14-3-3 proteins form homo- or heterodimers that interact with a wide variety of proteins: transcription factors, metabolic enzymes, cytoskeletal proteins, kinases, phosphatases, and other signaling molecules (3,4). The interaction of 14-3-3 proteins with their targets is primarily through a phospho-Ser/Thr motif. However, binding to divergent phospho-Ser/Thr motifs, as well as phosphorylation independent interactions has been observed (4). 14-3-3 binding masks specific sequences of the target protein, and therefore, modulates target protein localization, phosphorylation state, stability, and molecular interactions (1-4). 14-3-3 proteins may also induce target protein conformational changes that modify target protein function (4,5). Distinct temporal and spatial expression patterns of 14-3-3 isoforms have been observed in development and in acute response to extracellular signals and drugs, suggesting that 14-3-3 isoforms may perform different functions despite their sequence similarities (4). Several studies suggest that 14-3-3 isoforms are differentially regulated in cancer and neurological syndromes (2,3).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Ataxia telangiectasia mutated kinase (ATM) and ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related kinase (ATR) are PI3 kinase-related kinase (PIKK) family members that phosphorylate multiple substrates on serine or threonine residues that are followed by a glutamine in response to DNA damage or replication blocks (1-3). Despite the essential role of ATR in cell cycle signaling and DNA repair processes, little is known about its activation. ATR was long thought to exist in a constitutively active state in cells, with DNA damage-induced signaling occurring via recruitment of ATR to single stranded DNA and sites of replication stress. Phosphorylation of ATR at serine 428 in response to UV-induced DNA damage has been suggested as a means of activating ATR (4,5). Recent work has shown autophosphorylation of ATR at threonine 1989. Like ATM Ser1981, phosphorylation of ATR Thr1989 occurs in response to DNA damage, indicating that phosphorylation at this site is important in ATR-mediated signaling (6,7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Members of the homeodomain-interacting protein kinase (HIPK1-4) family of serine/threonine kinases regulate gene transcription with effects on cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis (1-3). HIPK1-3 are nuclear proteins that were originally described as co-repressors for homeobox transcription factors (1). HIPK proteins can interact with and/or phosphorylate many transcriptional regulators (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Pig, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The 14-3-3 family of proteins plays a key regulatory role in signal transduction, checkpoint control, apoptotic and nutrient-sensing pathways (1,2). 14-3-3 proteins are highly conserved and ubiquitously expressed. There are at least seven isoforms, β, γ, ε, σ, ζ, τ, and η that have been identified in mammals. The initially described α and δ isoforms are confirmed to be phosphorylated forms of β and ζ, respectively (3). Through their amino-terminal α helical region, 14-3-3 proteins form homo- or heterodimers that interact with a wide variety of proteins: transcription factors, metabolic enzymes, cytoskeletal proteins, kinases, phosphatases, and other signaling molecules (3,4). The interaction of 14-3-3 proteins with their targets is primarily through a phospho-Ser/Thr motif. However, binding to divergent phospho-Ser/Thr motifs, as well as phosphorylation independent interactions has been observed (4). 14-3-3 binding masks specific sequences of the target protein, and therefore, modulates target protein localization, phosphorylation state, stability, and molecular interactions (1-4). 14-3-3 proteins may also induce target protein conformational changes that modify target protein function (4,5). Distinct temporal and spatial expression patterns of 14-3-3 isoforms have been observed in development and in acute response to extracellular signals and drugs, suggesting that 14-3-3 isoforms may perform different functions despite their sequence similarities (4). Several studies suggest that 14-3-3 isoforms are differentially regulated in cancer and neurological syndromes (2,3).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
$717
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The p53 tumor suppressor protein plays a major role in cellular response to DNA damage and other genomic aberrations. Activation of p53 can lead to either cell cycle arrest and DNA repair or apoptosis (1). p53 is phosphorylated at multiple sites in vivo and by several different protein kinases in vitro (2,3). DNA damage induces phosphorylation of p53 at Ser15 and Ser20 and leads to a reduced interaction between p53 and its negative regulator, the oncoprotein MDM2 (4). MDM2 inhibits p53 accumulation by targeting it for ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation (5,6). p53 can be phosphorylated by ATM, ATR, and DNA-PK at Ser15 and Ser37. Phosphorylation impairs the ability of MDM2 to bind p53, promoting both the accumulation and activation of p53 in response to DNA damage (4,7). Chk2 and Chk1 can phosphorylate p53 at Ser20, enhancing its tetramerization, stability, and activity (8,9). p53 is phosphorylated at Ser392 in vivo (10,11) and by CAK in vitro (11). Phosphorylation of p53 at Ser392 is increased in human tumors (12) and has been reported to influence the growth suppressor function, DNA binding, and transcriptional activation of p53 (10,13,14). p53 is phosphorylated at Ser6 and Ser9 by CK1δ and CK1ε both in vitro and in vivo (13,15). Phosphorylation of p53 at Ser46 regulates the ability of p53 to induce apoptosis (16). Acetylation of p53 is mediated by p300 and CBP acetyltransferases. Inhibition of deacetylation suppressing MDM2 from recruiting HDAC1 complex by p19 (ARF) stabilizes p53. Acetylation appears to play a positive role in the accumulation of p53 protein in stress response (17). Following DNA damage, human p53 becomes acetylated at Lys382 (Lys379 in mouse) in vivo to enhance p53-DNA binding (18). Deacetylation of p53 occurs through interaction with the SIRT1 protein, a deacetylase that may be involved in cellular aging and the DNA damage response (19).