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Antibody Sampler Kit Organelle Organization and Biogenesis

The AMPK Subunit Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means to investigate the role played by all AMPK subunits in cellular energy homeostasis. The kit contains enough primary and secondary antibodies to perform two Western blots with each antibody.

Background: AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is highly conserved from yeast to plants and animals and plays a key role in the regulation of energy homeostasis (1). AMPK is a heterotrimeric complex composed of a catalytic α subunit and regulatory β and γ subunits, each of which is encoded by two or three distinct genes (α1, 2; β1, 2; γ1, 2, 3) (2). The kinase is activated by an elevated AMP/ATP ratio due to cellular and environmental stress, such as heat shock, hypoxia, and ischemia (1). The tumor suppressor LKB1, in association with accessory proteins STRAD and MO25, phosphorylates AMPKα at Thr172 in the activation loop, and this phosphorylation is required for AMPK activation (3-5). AMPKα is also phosphorylated at Thr258 and Ser485 (for α1; Ser491 for α2). The upstream kinase and the biological significance of these phosphorylation events have yet to be elucidated (6). The β1 subunit is post-translationally modified by myristoylation and multi-site phosphorylation including Ser24/25, Ser96, Ser101, Ser108, and Ser182 (6,7). Phosphorylation at Ser108 of the β1 subunit seems to be required for the activation of AMPK enzyme, while phosphorylation at Ser24/25 and Ser182 affects AMPK localization (7). Several mutations in AMPKγ subunits have been identified, most of which are located in the putative AMP/ATP binding sites (CBS or Bateman domains). Mutations at these sites lead to reduction of AMPK activity and cause glycogen accumulation in heart or skeletal muscle (1,2). Accumulating evidence indicates that AMPK not only regulates the metabolism of fatty acids and glycogen, but also modulates protein synthesis and cell growth through EF2 and TSC2/mTOR pathways, as well as blood flow via eNOS/nNOS (1).

The Angiogenesis Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means to investigate the angiogenic pathway downstream of VEGFR2. The kit contains enough primary antibody to perform two western blots per primary antibody.
The Phospho-MAPK Family Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of evaluating the phosphorylation state of p38, p44/42, and SAPK/JNK mitogen-activated protein kinases. The kit contains enough primary and secondary antibodies to perform two western blot experiments.

Background: p44/42 MAPK (Erk1/2), SAPK/JNK, and p38 MAPK function in protein kinase cascades that play a critical role in the regulation of cell growth, differentiation, and control of cellular responses to cytokines and stress. p44/42 MAPK is activated by growth and neurotrophic factors. Activation occurs through phosphorylation of threonine and tyrosine residues (Thr202 and Tyr204 in human Erk1) at the sequence T*EY* by a single upstream MAP kinase kinase (MEK). SAPK/JNK and p38 MAPK are activated by inflammatory cytokines and by a wide variety of cellular stresses. Activation of SAPK/JNK occurs via phosphorylation at Thr183 and Tyr185 by the dual specificity enzyme SEK/MKK4. Both MKK3 and SEK phosphorylate p38 MAPK on tyrosine and threonine at the sequence T*GY* to activate p38 MAP kinase (1-5).

The Phospho-p38 MAPK Pathway Sampler Kit provides an economical means to evaluate the activation status of multiple members of the p38 MAPK pathway, including phosphorylated MSK1, p38 MAPK, MKK3/MKK6, ATF-2, HSP27 and MAPKAPK-2. The kit includes enough primary and secondary antibodies to perform two Western blot experiments.

Background: p38 MAP kinase (MAPK), also called RK (1) or CSBP (2), is the mammalian orthologue of the yeast HOG kinase that participates in a signaling cascade controlling cellular responses to cytokines and stress (1-4). Four isoforms of p38 MAPK, p38α, β, γ (also known as Erk6 or SAPK3), and δ (also known as SAPK4) have been identified. Similar to the SAPK/JNK pathway, p38 MAPK is activated by a variety of cellular stresses including osmotic shock, inflammatory cytokines, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), UV light, and growth factors (1-5). MKK3, MKK6, and SEK activate p38 MAPK by phosphorylation at Thr180 and Tyr182. Activated p38 MAPK has been shown to phosphorylate and activate MAPKAP kinase 2 (3) and to phosphorylate the transcription factors ATF-2 (5), Max (6), and MEF2 (5-8). SB203580 (4-(4-fluorophenyl)-2-(4-methylsulfinylphenyl)-5-(4-pyridyl)-imidazole) is a selective inhibitor of p38 MAPK. This compound inhibits the activation of MAPKAPK-2 by p38 MAPK and subsequent phosphorylation of HSP27 (9). SB203580 inhibits p38 MAPK catalytic activity by binding to the ATP-binding pocket, but does not inhibit phosphorylation of p38 MAPK by upstream kinases (10).

The MAPK Family Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of evaluating total levels of p38, p44/42, and SAPK/JNK mitogen-activated protein kinases. The kit contains enough primary and secondary antibody to perform two western blot experiments.

Background: p44/42 MAPK (Erk1/2), SAPK/JNK, and p38 MAPK function in protein kinase cascades that play a critical role in the regulation of cell growth, differentiation, and control of cellular responses to cytokines and stress. p44/42 MAPK is activated by growth and neurotrophic factors. Activation occurs through phosphorylation of threonine and tyrosine residues (Thr202 and Tyr204 in human Erk1) at the sequence T*EY* by a single upstream MAP kinase kinase (MEK). SAPK/JNK and p38 MAPK are activated by inflammatory cytokines and by a wide variety of cellular stresses. Activation of SAPK/JNK occurs via phosphorylation at Thr183 and Tyr185 by the dual specificity enzyme SEK/MKK4. Both MKK3 and SEK phosphorylate p38 MAPK on tyrosine and threonine at the sequence T*GY* to activate p38 MAP kinase (1-5).

The Stress and Apoptosis Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of evaluating stress and apoptotic responses of each protein. The kit contains enough primary and secondary antibody to perform two western blot experiments per primary antibody.
The p38 MAPK Isoform Activation Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means to evaluate the activation status of individual isoforms of p38 MAPK through immunoprecipitation of the phosphorylated p38 MAPK followed by western blot using isoform specific antibodies. The kit includes enough primary and secondary antibodies to perform two IP/western blot experiments.

Background: p38 MAP kinase (MAPK), also called RK (1) or CSBP (2), is the mammalian orthologue of the yeast HOG kinase that participates in a signaling cascade controlling cellular responses to cytokines and stress (1-4). Four isoforms of p38 MAPK, p38α, β, γ (also known as Erk6 or SAPK3), and δ (also known as SAPK4) have been identified. Similar to the SAPK/JNK pathway, p38 MAPK is activated by a variety of cellular stresses including osmotic shock, inflammatory cytokines, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), UV light, and growth factors (1-5). MKK3, MKK6, and SEK activate p38 MAPK by phosphorylation at Thr180 and Tyr182. Activated p38 MAPK has been shown to phosphorylate and activate MAPKAP kinase 2 (3) and to phosphorylate the transcription factors ATF-2 (5), Max (6), and MEF2 (5-8). SB203580 (4-(4-fluorophenyl)-2-(4-methylsulfinylphenyl)-5-(4-pyridyl)-imidazole) is a selective inhibitor of p38 MAPK. This compound inhibits the activation of MAPKAPK-2 by p38 MAPK and subsequent phosphorylation of HSP27 (9). SB203580 inhibits p38 MAPK catalytic activity by binding to the ATP-binding pocket, but does not inhibit phosphorylation of p38 MAPK by upstream kinases (10).

The Endosomal Marker Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of distinguishing endosomes in the early, late, and recycling phases. The kit includes enough antibody to perform two western blot experiments with each primary antibody.
The Cell Cycle/Checkpoint Antibody Sampler Kit provides a fast and economical means of evaluating multiple proteins involved in the cell cyle and checkpoint control. The kit contains enough primary and secondary antibody to perform four Western blot experiments.

Background: The cell division cycle demands accuracy to avoid the accumulation of genetic damage. This process is controlled by molecular circuits called "checkpoints" that are common to all eukaryotic cells (1). Checkpoints monitor DNA integrity and cell growth prior to replication and division at the G1/S and G2/M transitions, respectively. The cdc2-cyclin B kinase is pivotal in regulating the G2/M transition (2,3). Cdc2 is phosphorylated at Thr14 and Tyr15 during G2-phase by the kinases Wee1 and Myt1, rendering it inactive. The tumor suppressor protein retinoblastoma (Rb) controls progression through the late G1 restriction point (R) and is a major regulator of the G1/S transition (4). During early and mid G1-phase, Rb binds to and represses the transcription factor E2F (5). The phosphorylation of Rb late in G1-phase by CDKs induces Rb to dissociate from E2F, permitting the transcription of S-phase-promoting genes. In vitro, Rb can be phosphorylated at multiple sites by cdc2, cdk2, and cdk4/6 (6-8). DNA damage triggers both the G2/M and the G1/S checkpoints. DNA damage activates the DNA-PK/ATM/ATR kinases, which phosphorylate Chk at Ser345 (9), Chk2 at Thr68 (10) and p53 (11). The Chk kinases inactivate cdc25 via phosphorylation at Ser216, blocking the activation of cdc2.

The AMPK Substrate Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of detecting total and phosphorylated substrates of AMPK. The kit provides enough antibody to perform two western blots with each primary antibody.

Background: AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is highly conserved from yeast to plants and animals and plays a key role in the regulation of energy homeostasis (1). AMPK is a heterotrimeric complex composed of a catalytic α subunit and regulatory β and γ subunits, each of which is encoded by two or three distinct genes (α1, 2; β1, 2; γ1, 2, 3) (2). The kinase is activated by an elevated AMP/ATP ratio due to cellular and environmental stress, such as heat shock, hypoxia, and ischemia (1). The tumor suppressor LKB1, in association with accessory proteins STRAD and MO25, phosphorylates AMPKα at Thr172 in the activation loop, and this phosphorylation is required for AMPK activation (3-5).AMPK phosphorylates a number of targets controlling cellular processes such as metabolism, cell growth, and autophagy (6). It suppresses the activity of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), that plays a key role in promoting cell growth. The regulatory associated protein of mTOR (Raptor) was identified as an mTOR binding partner that mediates mTOR signaling to downstream targets (7,8). Raptor binds to mTOR substrates, including 4E-BP1 and p70 S6 kinase, through their TOR signaling (TOS) motifs and is required for mTOR-mediated phosphorylation of these substrates (9,10). AMPK directly phosphorylates Raptor at Ser722/Ser792, and this phosphorylation is essential for inhibition of the raptor-containing mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) and induces cell cycle arrest when cells are stressed for energy (11). AMPK also promotes autophagy by directly phosphorylating ULK1 (11,12). ULK1 is a Ser/Thr kinase required for the Initiation and formation of the autophagosome. AMPK, activated during low nutrient conditions, directly phosphorylates ULK1 at multiple sites including Ser317, Ser555, and Ser777 (11,12). Conversely, mTOR, which is a regulator of cell growth and an inhibitor of autophagy, phosphorylates ULK1 at Ser757 and disrupts the interaction between ULK1 and AMPK (11). AMPK can also directly phosphorylate Beclin-1, a component of the complex downstream of ULK1 in autophagosome formation that activates the class III phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase VPS34. AMPK phosphorylates Beclin-1 at Ser93 and Ser96 residues in human, which correspond to murine Ser91 and Ser94 (14).

The Sirtuin Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of evaluating total levels of sirtuin proteins. The kit includes enough antibody to perform at least two western blot experiments with each primary antibody.
The CDK Antbody Sampler Kit provides and economical means of evaluating Cdk proteins. The kit contains enough primary and secondary antibodies to perform two western blot experiments.
The ULK1 Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical way to investigate ULK1 signaling. The kit contains enough primary antibody to perform two western blots with each primary antibody.

Background: Two related serine/threonine kinases, UNC-51-like kinase 1 and 2 (ULK1, ULK2), were discovered as mammalian homologs of the C. elegans gene UNC-51 in which mutants exhibited abnormal axonal extension and growth (1-4). Both proteins are widely expressed and contain an amino-terminal kinase domain followed by a central proline/serine rich domain and a highly conserved carboxy-terminal domain. The roles of ULK1 and ULK2 in axon growth have been linked to studies showing that the kinases are localized to neuronal growth cones and are involved in endocytosis of critical growth factors, such as NGF (5). Yeast two-hybrid studies found ULK1/2 associated with modulators of the endocytic pathway, SynGAP and syntenin (6). Structural similarity of ULK1/2 has also been recognized with the yeast autophagy protein Atg1/Apg1 (7). Knockdown experiments using siRNA demonstrated that ULK1 is essential for autophagy (8), a catabolic process for the degradation of bulk cytoplasmic contents (9,10). It appears that Atg1/ULK1 can act as a convergence point for multiple signals that control autophagy (11), and can bind to several autophagy-related (Atg) proteins, regulating phosphorylation states and protein trafficking (12-16).

The Mitochondrial Marker Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means to evaluate relevant mitochondial proteins. This kit contains enough primary antibody to perform two western blots per primary.
The Rab Family Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means to evaluate the presence and status of Rab proteins in cells. This kit provides enough primary and secondary antibodies to perform two Western blot experiments per primary antibody.
The 14-3-3 Family Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means to investigate the expression of various 14-3-3 isoforms within the cell. The kit contains enough primary and secondary antibodies to perform two Western blot experiments.

Background: The 14-3-3 family of proteins plays a key regulatory role in signal transduction, checkpoint control, apoptotic and nutrient-sensing pathways (1,2). 14-3-3 proteins are highly conserved and ubiquitously expressed. There are at least seven isoforms, β, γ, ε, σ, ζ, τ, and η that have been identified in mammals. The initially described α and δ isoforms are confirmed to be phosphorylated forms of β and ζ, respectively (3). Through their amino-terminal α helical region, 14-3-3 proteins form homo- or heterodimers that interact with a wide variety of proteins: transcription factors, metabolic enzymes, cytoskeletal proteins, kinases, phosphatases, and other signaling molecules (3,4). The interaction of 14-3-3 proteins with their targets is primarily through a phospho-Ser/Thr motif. However, binding to divergent phospho-Ser/Thr motifs, as well as phosphorylation independent interactions has been observed (4). 14-3-3 binding masks specific sequences of the target protein, and therefore, modulates target protein localization, phosphorylation state, stability, and molecular interactions (1-4). 14-3-3 proteins may also induce target protein conformational changes that modify target protein function (4,5). Distinct temporal and spatial expression patterns of 14-3-3 isoforms have been observed in development and in acute response to extracellular signals and drugs, suggesting that 14-3-3 isoforms may perform different functions despite their sequence similarities (4). Several studies suggest that 14-3-3 isoforms are differentially regulated in cancer and neurological syndromes (2,3).

The HSP/Chaperone Sampler Kit provides an economical means to investigate protein folding within the cell. The kit contains enough primary and secondary antibodies to perform two Western blot experiments with each antibody.
The PP2A Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of evaluating PP2A protein. The kit contains enough primary and secondary antibodies to perform two western blots with each antibody.

Background: Protein phosphatase type 2A (PP2A) is an essential protein serine/threonine phosphatase that is conserved in all eukaryotes. PP2A is a key enzyme within various signal transduction pathways as it regulates fundamental cellular activities such as DNA replication, transcription, translation, metabolism, cell cycle progression, cell division, apoptosis and development (1-3). The core enzyme consists of catalytic C and regulatory A (or PR65) subunits, with each subunit represented by α and β isoforms (1). Additional regulatory subunits belong to four different families of unrelated proteins. Both the B (or PR55) and B' regulatory protein families contain α, β, γ and δ isoforms, with the B' family also including an ε protein. B'' family proteins include PR72, PR130, PR59 and PR48 isoforms, while striatin (PR110) and SG2NA (PR93) are both members of the B''' regulatory protein family. These B subunits competitively bind to a shared binding site on the core A subunit (1). This variable array of holoenzyme components, particularly regulatory B subunits, allows PP2A to act in a diverse set of functions. PP2A function is regulated by expression, localization, holoenzyme composition and post-translational modification. Phosphorylation of PP2A at Tyr307 by Src occurs in response to EGF or insulin and results in a substantial reduction of PP2A activity (4). Reversible methylation on the carboxyl group of Leu309 of PP2A has been observed (5,6). Methylation alters the conformation of PP2A, as well as its localization and association with B regulatory subunits (6-8).

The Histone Deacetylase (HDAC) Antibody Sampler Kit provides a fast and economical means to evaluate the endogenous levels of HDACs. The kit contains enough primary and secondary antibodies to perform two Western blot experiments.

Background: Acetylation of the histone tail causes chromatin to adopt an "open" conformation, allowing increased accessibility of transcription factors to DNA. The identification of histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and their large multiprotein complexes has yielded important insights into how these enzymes regulate transcription (1,2). HAT complexes interact with sequence-specific activator proteins to target specific genes. In addition to histones, HATs can acetylate nonhistone proteins, suggesting multiple roles for these enzymes (3). In contrast, histone deacetylation promotes a "closed" chromatin conformation and typically leads to repression of gene activity (4). Mammalian histone deacetylases can be divided into three classes on the basis of their similarity to various yeast deacetylases (5). Class I proteins (HDACs 1, 2, 3, and 8) are related to the yeast Rpd3-like proteins, those in class II (HDACs 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, and 10) are related to yeast Hda1-like proteins, and class III proteins are related to the yeast protein Sir2. Inhibitors of HDAC activity are now being explored as potential therapeutic cancer agents (6,7).

The Class II HDAC Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of detecting Class II HDAC proteins using control antibodies against HDAC4, HDAC5, HDAC6, and HDAC7. The kit contains enough primary antibodies to perform at least two western blot experiments.

Background: Acetylation of the histone tail causes chromatin to adopt an "open" conformation, allowing increased accessibility of transcription factors to DNA. The identification of histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and their large multiprotein complexes has yielded important insights into how these enzymes regulate transcription (1,2). HAT complexes interact with sequence-specific activator proteins to target specific genes. In addition to histones, HATs can acetylate nonhistone proteins, suggesting multiple roles for these enzymes (3). In contrast, histone deacetylation promotes a "closed" chromatin conformation and typically leads to repression of gene activity (4). Mammalian histone deacetylases can be divided into three classes on the basis of their similarity to various yeast deacetylases (5). Class I proteins (HDACs 1, 2, 3, and 8) are related to the yeast Rpd3-like proteins, those in class II (HDACs 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, and 10) are related to yeast Hda1-like proteins, and class III proteins are related to the yeast protein Sir2. Inhibitors of HDAC activity are now being explored as potential therapeutic cancer agents (6,7).