Microsize antibodies for $99 | Learn More >>

Blocking Peptide Cell Adhesion

This peptide is used to specifically block Phospho-MEK1/2 (Ser221) (166F8) Rabbit mAb #2338 reactivity.

Background: MEK1 and MEK2, also called MAPK or Erk kinases, are dual-specificity protein kinases that function in a mitogen activated protein kinase cascade controlling cell growth and differentiation (1-3). Activation of MEK1 and MEK2 occurs through phosphorylation of two serine residues at positions 217 and 221, located in the activation loop of subdomain VIII, by Raf-like molecules. MEK1/2 is activated by a wide variety of growth factors and cytokines and also by membrane depolarization and calcium influx (1-4). Constitutively active forms of MEK1/2 are sufficient for the transformation of NIH/3T3 cells or the differentiation of PC-12 cells (4). MEK activates p44 and p42 MAP kinase by phosphorylating both threonine and tyrosine residues at sites located within the activation loop of kinase subdomain VIII.

This peptide is used to block Phospho-Ezrin (Thr567)/Radixin (Thr564)/Moesin (Thr558) (41A3) Rabbit mAb # 3149 reactivity.

Background: The ezrin, radixin, and moesin (ERM) proteins function as linkers between the plasma membrane and the actin cytoskeleton and are involved in cell adhesion, membrane ruffling, and microvilli formation (1). ERM proteins undergo intra or intermolecular interaction between their amino- and carboxy-terminal domains, existing as inactive cytosolic monomers or dimers (2). Phosphorylation at a carboxy-terminal threonine residue (Thr567 of ezrin, Thr564 of radixin, Thr558 of moesin) disrupts the amino- and carboxy-terminal association and may play a key role in regulating ERM protein conformation and function (3,4). Phosphorylation at Thr567 of ezrin is required for cytoskeletal rearrangements and oncogene-induced transformation (5). Ezrin is also phosphorylated at tyrosine residues upon growth factor stimulation. Phosphorylation of Tyr353 of ezrin transmits a survival signal during epithelial differentiation (6).

This peptide is used to block E-Cadherin (24E10) Rabbit mAb #3195 reactivity, as well as E-Cadherin Antibody #4065.

Background: Cadherins are a superfamily of transmembrane glycoproteins that contain cadherin repeats of approximately 100 residues in their extracellular domain. Cadherins mediate calcium-dependent cell-cell adhesion and play critical roles in normal tissue development (1). The classic cadherin subfamily includes N-, P-, R-, B-, and E-cadherins, as well as about ten other members that are found in adherens junctions, a cellular structure near the apical surface of polarized epithelial cells. The cytoplasmic domain of classical cadherins interacts with β-catenin, γ-catenin (also called plakoglobin), and p120 catenin. β-catenin and γ-catenin associate with α-catenin, which links the cadherin-catenin complex to the actin cytoskeleton (1,2). While β- and γ-catenin play structural roles in the junctional complex, p120 regulates cadherin adhesive activity and trafficking (1-4). Investigators consider E-cadherin an active suppressor of invasion and growth of many epithelial cancers (1-3). Research studies indicate that cancer cells have upregulated N-cadherin in addition to loss of E-cadherin. This change in cadherin expression is called the "cadherin switch." N-cadherin cooperates with the FGF receptor, leading to overexpression of MMP-9 and cellular invasion (3). Research studies have shown that in endothelial cells, VE-cadherin signaling, expression, and localization correlate with vascular permeability and tumor angiogenesis (5,6). Investigators have also demonstrated that expression of P-cadherin, which is normally present in epithelial cells, is also altered in ovarian and other human cancers (7,8).

$320
100 µg
This peptide is used to block HER2/ErbB2 (29D8) Rabbit mAb #2165 reactivity in immunohistochemistry protocols.
APPLICATIONS

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin)

Background: The ErbB2 (HER2) proto-oncogene encodes a 185 kDa transmembrane, receptor-like glycoprotein with intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity (1). While ErbB2 lacks an identified ligand, ErbB2 kinase activity can be activated in the absence of a ligand when overexpressed and through heteromeric associations with other ErbB family members (2). Amplification of the ErbB2 gene and overexpression of its product are detected in almost 40% of human breast cancers (3). Binding of the c-Cbl ubiquitin ligase to ErbB2 at Tyr1112 leads to ErbB2 poly-ubiquitination and enhances degradation of this kinase (4). ErbB2 is a key therapeutic target in the treatment of breast cancer and other carcinomas and targeting the regulation of ErbB2 degradation by the c-Cbl-regulated proteolytic pathway is one potential therapeutic strategy. Phosphorylation of the kinase domain residue Tyr877 of ErbB2 (homologous to Tyr416 of pp60c-Src) may be involved in regulating ErbB2 biological activity. The major autophosphorylation sites in ErbB2 are Tyr1248 and Tyr1221/1222; phosphorylation of these sites couples ErbB2 to the Ras-Raf-MAP kinase signal transduction pathway (1,5).

This peptide is used to block Phospho-HER2/ErbB2 (Tyr1221/1222) (6B12) Rabbit mAb #2243 reactivity.

Background: The ErbB2 (HER2) proto-oncogene encodes a 185 kDa transmembrane, receptor-like glycoprotein with intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity (1). While ErbB2 lacks an identified ligand, ErbB2 kinase activity can be activated in the absence of a ligand when overexpressed and through heteromeric associations with other ErbB family members (2). Amplification of the ErbB2 gene and overexpression of its product are detected in almost 40% of human breast cancers (3). Binding of the c-Cbl ubiquitin ligase to ErbB2 at Tyr1112 leads to ErbB2 poly-ubiquitination and enhances degradation of this kinase (4). ErbB2 is a key therapeutic target in the treatment of breast cancer and other carcinomas and targeting the regulation of ErbB2 degradation by the c-Cbl-regulated proteolytic pathway is one potential therapeutic strategy. Phosphorylation of the kinase domain residue Tyr877 of ErbB2 (homologous to Tyr416 of pp60c-Src) may be involved in regulating ErbB2 biological activity. The major autophosphorylation sites in ErbB2 are Tyr1248 and Tyr1221/1222; phosphorylation of these sites couples ErbB2 to the Ras-Raf-MAP kinase signal transduction pathway (1,5).

This peptide is used to block β-Catenin (6B3) Rabbit mAb #9582 and β-Catenin Antibody (Carboxy-terminal Antigen) #9587 reactivity in dot blot protocols.

Background: β-Catenin is a key downstream effector in the Wnt signaling pathway (1). It is implicated in two major biological processes in vertebrates: early embryonic development (2) and tumorigenesis (3). CK1 phosphorylates β-catenin at Ser45. This phosphorylation event primes β-catenin for subsequent phosphorylation by GSK-3β (4-6). GSK-3β destabilizes β-catenin by phosphorylating it at Ser33, Ser37, and Thr41 (7). Mutations at these sites result in the stabilization of β-catenin protein levels and have been found in many tumor cell lines (8).

This peptide is used to block LEF1 (C12A5) Rabbit mAb #2230 reactivity in dot blot protocols.

Background: LEF1 and TCF are members of the high mobility group (HMG) DNA binding protein family of transcription factors that consists of the following: Lymphoid Enhancer Factor 1 (LEF1), T Cell Factor 1 (TCF1/TCF7), TCF3/TCF7L1, and TCF4/TCF7L2 (1). LEF1 and TCF1/TCF7 were originally identified as important factors regulating early lymphoid development (2) and act downstream in Wnt signaling. LEF1 and TCF bind to Wnt response elements to provide docking sites for β-catenin, which translocates to the nucleus to promote the transcription of target genes upon activation of Wnt signaling (3). LEF1 and TCF are dynamically expressed during development and aberrant activation of the Wnt signaling pathway is involved in many types of cancers including colon cancer (4,5).

This peptide is used to block PP2A A Subunit (81G5) Rabbit mAb #2041 reactivity in dot blots or Western immunoblotting.

Background: Protein phosphatase type 2A (PP2A) is an essential protein serine/threonine phosphatase that is conserved in all eukaryotes. PP2A is a key enzyme within various signal transduction pathways as it regulates fundamental cellular activities such as DNA replication, transcription, translation, metabolism, cell cycle progression, cell division, apoptosis and development (1-3). The core enzyme consists of catalytic C and regulatory A (or PR65) subunits, with each subunit represented by α and β isoforms (1). Additional regulatory subunits belong to four different families of unrelated proteins. Both the B (or PR55) and B' regulatory protein families contain α, β, γ and δ isoforms, with the B' family also including an ε protein. B'' family proteins include PR72, PR130, PR59 and PR48 isoforms, while striatin (PR110) and SG2NA (PR93) are both members of the B''' regulatory protein family. These B subunits competitively bind to a shared binding site on the core A subunit (1). This variable array of holoenzyme components, particularly regulatory B subunits, allows PP2A to act in a diverse set of functions. PP2A function is regulated by expression, localization, holoenzyme composition and post-translational modification. Phosphorylation of PP2A at Tyr307 by Src occurs in response to EGF or insulin and results in a substantial reduction of PP2A activity (4). Reversible methylation on the carboxyl group of Leu309 of PP2A has been observed (5,6). Methylation alters the conformation of PP2A, as well as its localization and association with B regulatory subunits (6-8).

This peptide is used to specifically block Src Antibody #2108 and Src (36D10) Rabbit mAb #2109 reactivity.

Background: The Src family of protein tyrosine kinases, which includes Src, Lyn, Fyn, Yes, Lck, Blk, and Hck, are important in the regulation of growth and differentiation of eukaryotic cells (1). Src activity is regulated by tyrosine phosphorylation at two sites, but with opposing effects. While phosphorylation at Tyr416 in the activation loop of the kinase domain upregulates enzyme activity, phosphorylation at Tyr527 in the carboxy-terminal tail by Csk renders the enzyme less active (2).

This peptide is used to block PP2A C Subunit (52F8) Rabbit mAb #2259 and PP2A C Subunit Antibody #2038 reactivity in dot blot protocols.

Background: Protein phosphatase type 2A (PP2A) is an essential protein serine/threonine phosphatase that is conserved in all eukaryotes. PP2A is a key enzyme within various signal transduction pathways as it regulates fundamental cellular activities such as DNA replication, transcription, translation, metabolism, cell cycle progression, cell division, apoptosis and development (1-3). The core enzyme consists of catalytic C and regulatory A (or PR65) subunits, with each subunit represented by α and β isoforms (1). Additional regulatory subunits belong to four different families of unrelated proteins. Both the B (or PR55) and B' regulatory protein families contain α, β, γ and δ isoforms, with the B' family also including an ε protein. B'' family proteins include PR72, PR130, PR59 and PR48 isoforms, while striatin (PR110) and SG2NA (PR93) are both members of the B''' regulatory protein family. These B subunits competitively bind to a shared binding site on the core A subunit (1). This variable array of holoenzyme components, particularly regulatory B subunits, allows PP2A to act in a diverse set of functions. PP2A function is regulated by expression, localization, holoenzyme composition and post-translational modification. Phosphorylation of PP2A at Tyr307 by Src occurs in response to EGF or insulin and results in a substantial reduction of PP2A activity (4). Reversible methylation on the carboxyl group of Leu309 of PP2A has been observed (5,6). Methylation alters the conformation of PP2A, as well as its localization and association with B regulatory subunits (6-8).

$320
100 µg
This peptide is used to block Phospho-EGF Receptor (Tyr1068) Antibody #2234 reactivity.
APPLICATIONS

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: The epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor is a transmembrane tyrosine kinase that belongs to the HER/ErbB protein family. Ligand binding results in receptor dimerization, autophosphorylation, activation of downstream signaling, internalization, and lysosomal degradation (1,2). Phosphorylation of EGF receptor (EGFR) at Tyr845 in the kinase domain is implicated in stabilizing the activation loop, maintaining the active state enzyme, and providing a binding surface for substrate proteins (3,4). c-Src is involved in phosphorylation of EGFR at Tyr845 (5). The SH2 domain of PLCγ binds at phospho-Tyr992, resulting in activation of PLCγ-mediated downstream signaling (6). Phosphorylation of EGFR at Tyr1045 creates a major docking site for the adaptor protein c-Cbl, leading to receptor ubiquitination and degradation following EGFR activation (7,8). The GRB2 adaptor protein binds activated EGFR at phospho-Tyr1068 (9). A pair of phosphorylated EGFR residues (Tyr1148 and Tyr1173) provide a docking site for the Shc scaffold protein, with both sites involved in MAP kinase signaling activation (2). Phosphorylation of EGFR at specific serine and threonine residues attenuates EGFR kinase activity. EGFR carboxy-terminal residues Ser1046 and Ser1047 are phosphorylated by CaM kinase II; mutation of either of these serines results in upregulated EGFR tyrosine autophosphorylation (10).

This peptide is used to block Phospho-EGF Receptor (Tyr1173) (53A5) Rabbit mAb #4407 reactivity.

Background: The epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor is a transmembrane tyrosine kinase that belongs to the HER/ErbB protein family. Ligand binding results in receptor dimerization, autophosphorylation, activation of downstream signaling, internalization, and lysosomal degradation (1,2). Phosphorylation of EGF receptor (EGFR) at Tyr845 in the kinase domain is implicated in stabilizing the activation loop, maintaining the active state enzyme, and providing a binding surface for substrate proteins (3,4). c-Src is involved in phosphorylation of EGFR at Tyr845 (5). The SH2 domain of PLCγ binds at phospho-Tyr992, resulting in activation of PLCγ-mediated downstream signaling (6). Phosphorylation of EGFR at Tyr1045 creates a major docking site for the adaptor protein c-Cbl, leading to receptor ubiquitination and degradation following EGFR activation (7,8). The GRB2 adaptor protein binds activated EGFR at phospho-Tyr1068 (9). A pair of phosphorylated EGFR residues (Tyr1148 and Tyr1173) provide a docking site for the Shc scaffold protein, with both sites involved in MAP kinase signaling activation (2). Phosphorylation of EGFR at specific serine and threonine residues attenuates EGFR kinase activity. EGFR carboxy-terminal residues Ser1046 and Ser1047 are phosphorylated by CaM kinase II; mutation of either of these serines results in upregulated EGFR tyrosine autophosphorylation (10).

This peptide is used to block Phospho-HER3/ErbB3 (Tyr1289) (21D3) Rabbit mAb #4791 reactivity.

Background: HER3/ErbB3 is a member of the ErbB receptor protein tyrosine kinase family, but it lacks tyrosine kinase activity. Tyrosine phosphorylation of ErbB3 depends on its association with other ErbB tyrosine kinases. Upon ligand binding, heterodimers form between ErbB3 and other ErbB proteins, and ErbB3 is phosphorylated on tyrosine residues by the activated ErbB kinase (1,2). There are at least 9 potential tyrosine phosphorylation sites in the carboxy-terminal tail of ErbB3. These sites serve as consensus binding sites for signal transducing proteins, including Src family members, Grb2, and the p85 subunit of PI3 kinase, which mediate ErbB downstream signaling (3). Both Tyr1222 and Tyr1289 of ErbB3 reside within a YXXM motif and participate in signaling to PI3K (4).Investigators have found that ErbB3 is highly expressed in many cancer cells (5) and activation of the ErbB3/PI3K pathway is correlated with malignant phenotypes of adenocarcinomas (6). Research studies have demonstrated that in tumor development, ErbB3 may function as an oncogenic unit together with other ErbB members (e.g. ErbB2 requires ErbB3 to drive breast tumor cell proliferation) (7). Thus, investigators view inhibiting interaction between ErbB3 and ErbB tyrosine kinases as a novel strategy for anti-tumor therapy.

This peptide is used to specifically block Jak2 (D2E12) Rabbit mAb #3230 reactivity.

Background: Members of the Janus family of tyrosine kinases (Jak1, Jak2, Jak3, and Tyk2) are activated by ligands binding to a number of associated cytokine receptors (1). Upon cytokine receptor activation, Jak proteins become autophosphorylated and phosphorylate their associated receptors to provide multiple binding sites for signaling proteins. These associated signaling proteins, such as Stats (2), Shc (3), insulin receptor substrates (4), and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) (5), typically contain SH2 or other phospho-tyrosine-binding domains.

This peptide is used specifically to block GSK-3β (27C10) Rabbit mAb #9315 reactivity.

Background: Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) was initially identified as an enzyme that regulates glycogen synthesis in response to insulin (1). GSK-3 is a ubiquitously expressed serine/threonine protein kinase that phosphorylates and inactivates glycogen synthase. GSK-3 is a critical downstream element of the PI3K/Akt cell survival pathway whose activity can be inhibited by Akt-mediated phosphorylation at Ser21 of GSK-3α and Ser9 of GSK-3β (2,3). GSK-3 has been implicated in the regulation of cell fate in Dictyostelium and is a component of the Wnt signaling pathway required for Drosophila, Xenopus, and mammalian development (4). GSK-3 has been shown to regulate cyclin D1 proteolysis and subcellular localization (5).

$320
100 µg
This peptide is used to block PTEN (D4.3) XP Rabbit mAb # 9188 reactivity.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome ten), also referred to as MMAC (mutated in multiple advanced cancers) phosphatase, is a tumor suppressor implicated in a wide variety of human cancers (1). PTEN encodes a 403 amino acid polypeptide originally described as a dual-specificity protein phosphatase (2). The main substrates of PTEN are inositol phospholipids generated by the activation of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) (3). PTEN is a major negative regulator of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway (1,4,5). PTEN possesses a carboxy-terminal, noncatalytic regulatory domain with three phosphorylation sites (Ser380, Thr382, and Thr383) that regulate PTEN stability and may affect its biological activity (6,7). PTEN regulates p53 protein levels and activity (8) and is involved in G protein-coupled signaling during chemotaxis (9,10).