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Dog Proteasomal Ubiquitin-Dependent Protein Catabolic Process

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Dog, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Protein ubiquitination and deubiquitination are reversible processes catalyzed by ubiquitinating enzymes (UBEs) and deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) respectively (1,2). DUBs are categorized into five subfamilies-USP, UCH, OTU, MJD, and JAMM. Ubiquitin-specific protease 9, X-linked (USP9X) possesses a well-conserved catalytic domain with cysteine peptidase activity, which allows for cleavage of ubiquitin and polyubiquitin conjugates. USP9X is the mammalian homolog of the Drosophila fat-facets (faf) gene, which is essential for normal eye development and viability of the early fly embryo (3,4). While USP9X expression is also critical for normal mammalian development (5-7), many of its substrates are only beginning to be elucidated. There is mounting evidence that USP9X functions in the formation of epithelial cell-cell contacts through deubiquitination-dependent stabilization of molecules involved in maintaining the integrity of both adherens and tight junctions. Indeed, USP9X has been found to associate with AF-6, the β-catenin-E-cadherin complex, and EFA6 (8-11). Research studies have also demonstrated that USP9X is an integral component of the TGF-β/BMP signaling cascade by opposing TRIM33-mediated monoubiquitination of SMAD4 (12). USP9X is overexpressed in a variety of human cancers and contributes to enhanced cell survival, in part, through its ability to deubiquitinate and stabilize the Mcl-1 oncoprotein (13). There is some evidence, however, that suggests the role of USP9X in tumorigenesis is context dependent. Research studies have implicated USP9X in a tumor suppressor role during the early stages of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and in an oncogenic role during advanced stages of PDAC (14,15).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Chicken, D. melanogaster, Dog, Guinea Pig, Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Pig, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Akt, also referred to as PKB or Rac, plays a critical role in controlling survival and apoptosis (1-3). This protein kinase is activated by insulin and various growth and survival factors to function in a wortmannin-sensitive pathway involving PI3 kinase (2,3). Akt is activated by phospholipid binding and activation loop phosphorylation at Thr308 by PDK1 (4) and by phosphorylation within the carboxy terminus at Ser473. The previously elusive PDK2 responsible for phosphorylation of Akt at Ser473 has been identified as mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in a rapamycin-insensitive complex with rictor and Sin1 (5,6). Akt promotes cell survival by inhibiting apoptosis through phosphorylation and inactivation of several targets, including Bad (7), forkhead transcription factors (8), c-Raf (9), and caspase-9. PTEN phosphatase is a major negative regulator of the PI3 kinase/Akt signaling pathway (10). LY294002 is a specific PI3 kinase inhibitor (11). Another essential Akt function is the regulation of glycogen synthesis through phosphorylation and inactivation of GSK-3α and β (12,13). Akt may also play a role in insulin stimulation of glucose transport (12). In addition to its role in survival and glycogen synthesis, Akt is involved in cell cycle regulation by preventing GSK-3β-mediated phosphorylation and degradation of cyclin D1 (14) and by negatively regulating the cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors p27 Kip1 (15) and p21 Waf1/Cip1 (16). Akt also plays a critical role in cell growth by directly phosphorylating mTOR in a rapamycin-sensitive complex containing raptor (17). More importantly, Akt phosphorylates and inactivates tuberin (TSC2), an inhibitor of mTOR within the mTOR-raptor complex (18,19).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
$717
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, D. melanogaster, Dog, Hamster, Human, Mouse, Pig, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Akt, also referred to as PKB or Rac, plays a critical role in controlling survival and apoptosis (1-3). This protein kinase is activated by insulin and various growth and survival factors to function in a wortmannin-sensitive pathway involving PI3 kinase (2,3). Akt is activated by phospholipid binding and activation loop phosphorylation at Thr308 by PDK1 (4) and by phosphorylation within the carboxy terminus at Ser473. The previously elusive PDK2 responsible for phosphorylation of Akt at Ser473 has been identified as mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in a rapamycin-insensitive complex with rictor and Sin1 (5,6). Akt promotes cell survival by inhibiting apoptosis through phosphorylation and inactivation of several targets, including Bad (7), forkhead transcription factors (8), c-Raf (9), and caspase-9. PTEN phosphatase is a major negative regulator of the PI3 kinase/Akt signaling pathway (10). LY294002 is a specific PI3 kinase inhibitor (11). Another essential Akt function is the regulation of glycogen synthesis through phosphorylation and inactivation of GSK-3α and β (12,13). Akt may also play a role in insulin stimulation of glucose transport (12). In addition to its role in survival and glycogen synthesis, Akt is involved in cell cycle regulation by preventing GSK-3β-mediated phosphorylation and degradation of cyclin D1 (14) and by negatively regulating the cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors p27 Kip1 (15) and p21 Waf1/Cip1 (16). Akt also plays a critical role in cell growth by directly phosphorylating mTOR in a rapamycin-sensitive complex containing raptor (17). More importantly, Akt phosphorylates and inactivates tuberin (TSC2), an inhibitor of mTOR within the mTOR-raptor complex (18,19).