Microsize antibodies for $99 | Learn More >>

Hamster Cell Cycle

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: RPA70 (HSSB, REPA1, RF-A, RP-A, p70) is a component of a heterotrimeric complex, composed of 70, 32/30 and 14 kDa subunits, collectively known as RPA. RPA is a single stranded DNA binding protein, whose DNA binding activity is believed to reside entirely in the 70 kDa subunit. The complex is required for almost all aspects of cellular DNA metabolism such as DNA replication (1-3), recombination, cell cycle and DNA damage checkpoints, and all major types of DNA repair including nucleotide excision, base excision, mismatch and double-strand break repairs (4-7). In response to genotoxic stress in eukaryotic cells, RPA has been shown to associate with the Rad9/Rad1/Hus1 (9-1-1) checkpoint complex (8). RPA is hyperphosphorylated upon DNA damage or replication stress by checkpoint kinases including ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), ATM and Rad3-related (ATR), and DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) (9-11). Phosphorylation of RPA32 occurs at serines 4, 8 and 33 (11). Hyperphosphorylation may alter RPA-DNA and RPA-protein interactions. In addition to the checkpoint partners, RPA interacts with a wide variety of protein partners, including proteins required for normal replication such as RCF, PCNA and Pol α, and also proteins involved in SV40 replication, such as DNA polymerase I and SV40 large T antigen (10,12).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The 20S proteasome is the major proteolytic enzyme complex involved in intracellular protein degradation. PA700, PA28, and PA200 are three major protein complexes that function as activators of the 20S proteasome. There are three evolutionarily conserved subunits of PA28: PA28α (PSME1), PA28β (PSME2), and PA28γ (PSME3) (1,2). PA28α and PA28β form a heteroheptameric complex and function by binding to the 20S complex at its opening site(s). The PA28α/β complex is present throughout the cell and participates in MHC class I antigen presentation by promoting the generation of antigenic peptides from foreign proteins (2). PA28γ exists in the form of a homoheptamer and is mainly located in the nucleus. The PA28γ complex exerts its function by binding and guiding specific nuclear target proteins to the 20S proteasome for further degradation (3,4).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Dog, Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The minichromosome maintenance (MCM) 2-7 proteins are a family of six related proteins required for initiation and elongation of DNA replication. MCM2-7 bind together to form the heterohexameric MCM complex that is thought to act as a replicative helicase at the DNA replication fork (1-5). This complex is a key component of the pre-replication complex (pre-RC) (reviewed in 1). Cdc6 and CDT1 recruit the MCM complex to the origin recognition complex (ORC) during late mitosis/early G1 phase forming the pre-RC and licensing the DNA for replication (reviewed in 2). Licensing of the chromatin permits the DNA to replicate only once per cell cycle, thereby helping to ensure that genetic alterations and malignant cell growth do not occur (reviewed in 3). Phosphorylation of the MCM2, MCM3, MCM4, and MCM6 subunits appears to regulate MCM complex activity and the initiation of DNA synthesis (6-8). CDK1 phosphorylation of MCM3 at Ser112 during late mitosis/early G1 phase has been shown to initiate complex formation and chromatin loading in vitro (8). Phosphorylation of MCM2 at serine 139 by cdc7/dbf4 coincides with the initiation of DNA replication (9). MCM proteins are removed during DNA replication, causing chromatin to become unlicensed through inhibition of pre-RC reformation. Studies have shown that the MCM complex is involved in checkpoint control by protecting the structure of the replication fork and assisting in restarting replication by recruiting checkpoint proteins after arrest (reviewed in 3,10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The minichromosome maintenance (MCM) 2-7 proteins are a family of six related proteins required for initiation and elongation of DNA replication. MCM2-7 bind together to form the heterohexameric MCM complex that is thought to act as a replicative helicase at the DNA replication fork (1-5). This complex is a key component of the pre-replication complex (pre-RC) (reviewed in 1). Cdc6 and CDT1 recruit the MCM complex to the origin recognition complex (ORC) during late mitosis/early G1 phase forming the pre-RC and licensing the DNA for replication (reviewed in 2). Licensing of the chromatin permits the DNA to replicate only once per cell cycle, thereby helping to ensure that genetic alterations and malignant cell growth do not occur (reviewed in 3). Phosphorylation of the MCM2, MCM3, MCM4, and MCM6 subunits appears to regulate MCM complex activity and the initiation of DNA synthesis (6-8). CDK1 phosphorylation of MCM3 at Ser112 during late mitosis/early G1 phase has been shown to initiate complex formation and chromatin loading in vitro (8). Phosphorylation of MCM2 at serine 139 by cdc7/dbf4 coincides with the initiation of DNA replication (9). MCM proteins are removed during DNA replication, causing chromatin to become unlicensed through inhibition of pre-RC reformation. Studies have shown that the MCM complex is involved in checkpoint control by protecting the structure of the replication fork and assisting in restarting replication by recruiting checkpoint proteins after arrest (reviewed in 3,10).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The origin recognition complex (ORC) is a highly conserved heterohexameric protein complex that associates with DNA at or near initiation of DNA replication sites. All six ORC subunits are essential for initiation of DNA replication (1-3), and ORC may be involved in regulation of gene expression in response to stress (4). ORC binding to DNA permits the ordered binding of other proteins such as cdc6 and MCMs to form pre-replication complexes (Pre-RCs). Pre-RCs form between telophase and early G1 phase of the cell cycle and are inactivated at the onset of DNA synthesis, allowing coordinated regulation of DNA replication and cell division (5). Modification of one or more of the six ORC subunits may be responsible for its inactivation during S phase, but the chromatin binding behavior of the ORC subunits during the cell division cycle is still under investigation (6-7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The origin recognition complex (ORC) is a highly conserved heterohexameric protein complex that associates with DNA at or near initiation of DNA replication sites. All six ORC subunits are essential for initiation of DNA replication (1-3), and ORC may be involved in regulation of gene expression in response to stress (4). ORC binding to DNA permits the ordered binding of other proteins such as cdc6 and MCMs to form pre-replication complexes (Pre-RCs). Pre-RCs form between telophase and early G1 phase of the cell cycle and are inactivated at the onset of DNA synthesis, allowing coordinated regulation of DNA replication and cell division (5). Modification of one or more of the six ORC subunits may be responsible for its inactivation during S phase, but the chromatin binding behavior of the ORC subunits during the cell division cycle is still under investigation (6-7).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Dog, Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: P-TEFb is a general transcription factor that regulates transcription elongation through phosphorylation of the C-terminal tail domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase II (RNAP II). The P-TEFb complex is composed of a catalytic subunit, CDK9, and its regulatory cyclin partner, which can be cyclin T1, T2a, T2b or K (reviewed in 1,2). P-TEFb is recruited by the HIV Tat protein to allow transcriptional elongation, and subsequent replication of the viral genome. Inhibition of P-TEFb function therefore has potential for HIV therapy. CDK9 exists as two isoforms, an abundant 42 kDa isoform, and a less abundant 55 kDa isoform, which contains an amino-terminal extension (3). The two forms likely have distinct purposes based on differential expression during lymphocyte activation (4,5) and on their localization within the nucleus (5).Cyclin dependent kinases (CDKs) are activated in part by cyclin binding and by phosphorylation of a conserved threonine in the T-loop domain. Phosphorylation of CDK9 at the T-loop Thr186 by an unidentified nuclear kinase may be important in P-TEFb activation (6) and regulation of HIV transcription (7). Acetylation of CDK9 at Lys44 affects its ability to phosphorylate the RNAPII CTD (8).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The entry of eukaryotic cells into mitosis is regulated by cdc2 kinase activation, a process controlled at several steps including cyclin binding and phosphorylation of cdc2 at Thr161 (1). However, the critical regulatory step in activating cdc2 during progression into mitosis appears to be dephosphorylation of cdc2 at Thr14 and Tyr15 (2). Phosphorylation at Thr14 and Tyr15, resulting in inhibition of cdc2, can be carried out by Wee1 and Myt1 protein kinases (3,4). The cdc25 phosphatase may be responsible for removal of phosphates at Thr14 and Tyr15 and subsequent activation of cdc2 (1,5).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) is a ubiquitous eukaryotic protein serine/threonine phosphatase involved in the regulation of various cell functions. Substrate specificity is determined by the binding of a regulatory subunit to the PP1 catalytic subunit (PP1c). It is estimated that over fifty different regulatory subunits exist (1).The myosin phosphatase holoenzyme is composed of three subunits: PP1c, a targeting/regulatory subunit (MYPT/myosin-binding subunit of myosin phosphatase), and a 20 kDa subunit of unknown function (M20). MYPT binding to PP1cδ alters the conformation of the catalytic cleft and increases enzyme activity and specificity (2). Two MYPT isoforms that are 61% identical have been described. MYPT1 is widely expressed, while MYPT2 expression appears to be exclusive to heart and brain (3). Related family members include MBS85, MYPT3, and TIMAP (4).Myosin phosphatase regulates the interaction of actin and myosin in response to signaling through the small GTPase Rho. Rho activity inhibits myosin phosphatase via Rho-associated kinase (ROCK). Phosphorylation of MYPT1 at Thr696 and Thr853 results in phosphatase inhibition and cytoskeletal reorganization (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The Mitotic Checkpoint Complex (MCC), which contains Bub1, Bub1b, Bub3, Mad2, and Cdc20, controls chromosome segregation and monitors kinetochore-microtubule interactions (1). During mitosis, the MCC complex inhibits the ubiquitin ligase activity of the Anaphase Promoting Complex/Cyclosome (APC/C), thereby preventing cells with unaligned chromosomes from prematurely entering anaphase (2). Research studies have shown that Bub1b and Bub1 kinases are mutated in several types of human malignancies including hematopoietic, colorectal, lung, and breast cancers (3). Biallelic mutations in Bub1b have been found in mosaic variegated aneuploidy syndrome and premature chromatid separation syndrome (4). Bub1b mouse germline knockouts are embryonic lethal with heterozygous animals displaying genetic instability, early aging phenotypes, and increased cancer susceptibility (5). Bub3 binds both Bub1 and Bub1b, facilitating their recruitment to kinetochores (6), and is required for functional microtubule-kinetochore interactions (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The minichromosome maintenance (MCM) 2-7 proteins are a family of six related proteins required for initiation and elongation of DNA replication. MCM2-7 bind together to form the heterohexameric MCM complex that is thought to act as a replicative helicase at the DNA replication fork (1-5). This complex is a key component of the pre-replication complex (pre-RC) (reviewed in 1). Cdc6 and CDT1 recruit the MCM complex to the origin recognition complex (ORC) during late mitosis/early G1 phase forming the pre-RC and licensing the DNA for replication (reviewed in 2). Licensing of the chromatin permits the DNA to replicate only once per cell cycle, thereby helping to ensure that genetic alterations and malignant cell growth do not occur (reviewed in 3). Phosphorylation of the MCM2, MCM3, MCM4, and MCM6 subunits appears to regulate MCM complex activity and the initiation of DNA synthesis (6-8). CDK1 phosphorylation of MCM3 at Ser112 during late mitosis/early G1 phase has been shown to initiate complex formation and chromatin loading in vitro (8). Phosphorylation of MCM2 at serine 139 by cdc7/dbf4 coincides with the initiation of DNA replication (9). MCM proteins are removed during DNA replication, causing chromatin to become unlicensed through inhibition of pre-RC reformation. Studies have shown that the MCM complex is involved in checkpoint control by protecting the structure of the replication fork and assisting in restarting replication by recruiting checkpoint proteins after arrest (reviewed in 3,10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The minichromosome maintenance (MCM) 2-7 proteins are a family of six related proteins required for initiation and elongation of DNA replication. MCM2-7 bind together to form the heterohexameric MCM complex that is thought to act as a replicative helicase at the DNA replication fork (1-5). This complex is a key component of the pre-replication complex (pre-RC) (reviewed in 1). Cdc6 and CDT1 recruit the MCM complex to the origin recognition complex (ORC) during late mitosis/early G1 phase forming the pre-RC and licensing the DNA for replication (reviewed in 2). Licensing of the chromatin permits the DNA to replicate only once per cell cycle, thereby helping to ensure that genetic alterations and malignant cell growth do not occur (reviewed in 3). Phosphorylation of the MCM2, MCM3, MCM4, and MCM6 subunits appears to regulate MCM complex activity and the initiation of DNA synthesis (6-8). CDK1 phosphorylation of MCM3 at Ser112 during late mitosis/early G1 phase has been shown to initiate complex formation and chromatin loading in vitro (8). Phosphorylation of MCM2 at serine 139 by cdc7/dbf4 coincides with the initiation of DNA replication (9). MCM proteins are removed during DNA replication, causing chromatin to become unlicensed through inhibition of pre-RC reformation. Studies have shown that the MCM complex is involved in checkpoint control by protecting the structure of the replication fork and assisting in restarting replication by recruiting checkpoint proteins after arrest (reviewed in 3,10).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Tuberin is a product of the TSC2 tumor suppressor gene and an important regulator of cell proliferation and tumor development (1). Mutations in either TSC2 or the related TSC1 (hamartin) gene cause tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by development of multiple, widespread non-malignant tumors (2). Tuberin is directly phosphorylated at Thr1462 by Akt/PKB (3). Phosphorylation at Thr1462 and Tyr1571 regulates tuberin-hamartin complexes and tuberin activity (3-5). In addition, tuberin inhibits the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), which promotes inhibition of p70 S6 kinase, activation of eukaryotic initiation factor 4E binding protein 1 (4E-BP1, an inhibitor of translation initiation), and eventual inhibition of translation (3,6,7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Initiation of eukaryotic DNA replication is a stringently regulated process that requires the cooperation of many proteins and protein complexes to occur efficiently, at the origins of replication, and once per cell cycle. The initiation of DNA replication requires a protein complex composed of two DNA polymerase α subunits and a pair of primase subunits. Primase activity catalyzes de novo synthesis of an RNA/DNA primer (initiator DNA) on the leading and lagging strands, while polymerase activity extends the initiator DNA (1). The 48 and 58 kDa primase subunits cooperate in the synthesis of small RNA primers. p48 is the catalytically active subunit (2), while p58 couples p48 to the polymerase to allow the transfer of primers to the active site. The p58 subunit may also play a role in regulation of primer length (3,4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The methylation of deoxyuridine monophosphate (dUMP) to deoxythymidine monophosphate (dTMP) is an essential step in the formation of thymine nucleotides (1,2, reviewed in 3). This process is catalyzed by thymidylate synthase (TS or TYMS), a homodimer composed of two 30 kDa subunits. TS is an intracellular enzyme that provides the sole de novo source of thymidylate, making it a required enzyme in DNA biosynthesis with activity highest in proliferating cells (1). Being the exclusive source of dTMP, investigators have concluded that TS is also an important target for anticancer agents such as 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) (1-5). 5-FU acts as a TS inhibitor and is active against solid tumors such as colon, breast, head, and neck. Research studies have demonstrated that patients with metastases expressing lower levels of TS have a higher response rate to treatment with 5-FU than patients with tumors that have increased levels of TS (5). Researchers continue to investigate TS expression in different types of cancers (6-10).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The second messenger cyclic AMP (cAMP) activates cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA or cAPK) in mammalian cells and controls many cellular mechanisms such as gene transcription, ion transport, and protein phosphorylation (1). Inactive PKA is a heterotetramer composed of a regulatory subunit (R) dimer and a catalytic subunit (C) dimer. In this inactive state, the pseudosubstrate sequences on the R subunits block the active sites on the C subunits. Three C subunit isoforms (C-α, C-β, and C-γ) and two families of regulatory subunits (RI and RII) with distinct cAMP binding properties have been identified. The two R families exist in two isoforms, α and β (RI-α, RI-β, RII-α, and RII-β). Upon binding of cAMP to the R subunits, the autoinhibitory contact is eased and active monomeric C subunits are released. PKA shares substrate specificity with Akt (PKB) and PKC, which are characterized by an arginine at position -3 relative to the phosphorylated serine or threonine residue (2). Substrates that present this consensus sequence and have been shown to be phosphorylated by PKA are Bad (Ser155), CREB (Ser133), and GSK-3 (GSK-3α Ser21 and GSK-3β Ser9) (3-5). In addition, combined knock-down of PKA C-α and -β blocks cAMP-mediated phosphorylation of Raf (Ser43 and Ser259) (6). Autophosphorylation and phosphorylation by PDK-1 are two known mechanisms responsible for phosphorylation of the C subunit at Thr197 (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Hamster, Human, Monkey, Pig, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: HSP70 and HSP90 are molecular chaperones expressed constitutively under normal conditions to maintain protein homeostasis and are induced upon environmental stress (1). Both HSP70 and HSP90 are able to interact with unfolded proteins to prevent irreversible aggregation and catalyze the refolding of their substrates in an ATP- and co-chaperone-dependent manner (1). HSP70 has a broad range of substrates including newly synthesized and denatured proteins, while HSP90 tends to have a more limited subset of substrates, most of which are signaling molecules. HSP70 and HSP90 often function collaboratively in a multi-chaperone system, which requires a minimal set of co-chaperones: HSP40, Hop, and p23 (2,3). The co-chaperones either regulate the intrinsic ATPase activity of the chaperones or recruit chaperones to specific substrates or subcellular compartments (1,4). When the ubiquitin ligase CHIP associates with the HSP70/HSP90 complex as a cofactor, the unfolded substrates are subjected to degradation by the proteasome (4). The biological functions of HSP70/HSP90 extend beyond their chaperone activity. They are essential for the maturation and inactivation of nuclear hormones and other signaling molecules (1,3). They also play a role in vesicle formation and protein trafficking (2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Mitofusins are mitochondrial transmembrane GTPases that function to regulate mitochondrial fusion, a process that occurs in concert with mitochondrial division and is necessary for the maintenance of structural and genetic mitochondrial integrity (1,2). Two mitofusins have been described in mammals, mitofusin-1 and -2, which share 60% amino acid identity and appear to function coordinately to regulate mitochondrial fusion (3). Mitochondrial fusion is widely recognized as important for normal cell growth and development (4), and may have evolved as a mechanism to offset the deleterious effects of mtDNA mutations (3). Null mutations in either mitofusin are embryonic lethal in mice, whereas conditional knockout studies have shown that combined deletion of mitofusin-1 and mitofusin-2 in skeletal muscle results in severe mitochondrial dysfunction (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: CYLD is a cytoplasmic deubiquitinating enzyme encoded by a tumor suppressor gene altered in individuals diagnosed with cylindromatosis, a genetic condition characterized by benign tumors of skin appendages (1,2). Functional CYLD deubiquitinase regulates inflammation and cell proliferation by down regulating NF-κB signaling through removal of ubiquitin chains from several NF-κB pathway proteins (3,4). CYLD is a negative regulator of proximal events in Wnt/β-catenin signaling and is a critical regulator of natural killer T cell development (5,6). The transcription factor Snail can inhibit CYLD expression, resulting in melanoma cell proliferation (7).

$336
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Dog, Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The minichromosome maintenance (MCM) 2-7 proteins are a family of six related proteins required for initiation and elongation of DNA replication. MCM2-7 bind together to form the heterohexameric MCM complex that is thought to act as a replicative helicase at the DNA replication fork (1-5). This complex is a key component of the pre-replication complex (pre-RC) (reviewed in 1). Cdc6 and CDT1 recruit the MCM complex to the origin recognition complex (ORC) during late mitosis/early G1 phase forming the pre-RC and licensing the DNA for replication (reviewed in 2). Licensing of the chromatin permits the DNA to replicate only once per cell cycle, thereby helping to ensure that genetic alterations and malignant cell growth do not occur (reviewed in 3). Phosphorylation of the MCM2, MCM3, MCM4, and MCM6 subunits appears to regulate MCM complex activity and the initiation of DNA synthesis (6-8). CDK1 phosphorylation of MCM3 at Ser112 during late mitosis/early G1 phase has been shown to initiate complex formation and chromatin loading in vitro (8). Phosphorylation of MCM2 at serine 139 by cdc7/dbf4 coincides with the initiation of DNA replication (9). MCM proteins are removed during DNA replication, causing chromatin to become unlicensed through inhibition of pre-RC reformation. Studies have shown that the MCM complex is involved in checkpoint control by protecting the structure of the replication fork and assisting in restarting replication by recruiting checkpoint proteins after arrest (reviewed in 3,10).