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Human Anterograde Axon Cargo Transport

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: actin microfilaments, intermediate filaments, and microtubules. Neurofilaments are the major intermediate filaments found in neurons and consist of light (NFL), medium (NFM), and heavy (NFH) subunits (1). Similar in structure to other intermediate filament proteins, neurofilaments have a globular amino-terminal head, a central α-helical rod domain, and a carboxy-terminal tail. A heterotetrameric unit (NFL-NFM and NFL-NFH) forms a protofilament, with eight protofilaments comprising the typical 10 nm intermediate filament (2). While neurofilaments are critical for radial axon growth and determine axon caliber, microtubules are involved in axon elongation. PKA phosphorylates the head domain of NFL and NFM to inhibit neurofilament assembly (3,4). Research studies have shown neurofilament accumulations in many human neurological disorders including Parkinson's disease (in Lewy bodies along with α-synuclein), Alzheimer's disease, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) (1).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: actin microfilaments, intermediate filaments, and microtubules. Neurofilaments are the major intermediate filaments found in neurons and consist of light (NFL), medium (NFM), and heavy (NFH) subunits (1). Similar in structure to other intermediate filament proteins, neurofilaments have a globular amino-terminal head, a central α-helical rod domain, and a carboxy-terminal tail. A heterotetrameric unit (NFL-NFM and NFL-NFH) forms a protofilament, with eight protofilaments comprising the typical 10 nm intermediate filament (2). While neurofilaments are critical for radial axon growth and determine axon caliber, microtubules are involved in axon elongation. PKA phosphorylates the head domain of NFL and NFM to inhibit neurofilament assembly (3,4). Research studies have shown neurofilament accumulations in many human neurological disorders including Parkinson's disease (in Lewy bodies along with α-synuclein), Alzheimer's disease, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) (1).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Dysbindin, or dystrobrevin-binding protein 1, is a coiled-coil-containing protein expressed in muscle and brain that was identified as a binding partner of dystrobrevin (1). Dysbindin upregulates expression of the pre-synaptic proteins SNAP25 and synapsin I, thereby increasing glutamate release and promoting neuronal viability through Akt signaling. In particular, Akt phosphorylation is suppressed with downregulation of dysbindin and increased with upregulation of dysbindin (2). A nonsense mutation of dysbindin causes Hermansky-Pudlak disease, an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by lysosomal storage defects and prolonged bleeding. (2). Genetic variation in the gene encoding dysbindin is strongly associated with schizophrenia and protein levels are reduced in the prefrontal cortex, midbrain and hippocampus of brains from patients with schizophrenia (3,4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Western Blotting

Background: SOD1, Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase, is a major antioxidant enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of superoxide anion to hydrogen peroxide and molecular oxygen (1). SOD1 is ubiquitously expressed and is localized in the cytosol, nucleus and mitochondrial intermembrane space. The SOD1 gene locus is on chromosome 21 in a region affected in Down Syndrome (2). In addition, over 100 distinct SOD1 inherited mutations have been identified in the familial form of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a progressive degenerative disease of motor neurons (3-5). Despite the fact that SOD1 helps to eliminate toxic reactive species, its mutations in ALS have been described as gain-of-function (5). The mechanism by which mutant SOD1 induces the neurodegeneration observed in ALS is still unclear. Mutant SOD1 proteins become misfolded and consequently oligomerize into high molecular weight species that aggregate and end up in proteinaceous inclusions (5).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: SOD1, Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase, is a major antioxidant enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of superoxide anion to hydrogen peroxide and molecular oxygen (1). SOD1 is ubiquitously expressed and is localized in the cytosol, nucleus and mitochondrial intermembrane space. The SOD1 gene locus is on chromosome 21 in a region affected in Down Syndrome (2). In addition, over 100 distinct SOD1 inherited mutations have been identified in the familial form of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a progressive degenerative disease of motor neurons (3-5). Despite the fact that SOD1 helps to eliminate toxic reactive species, its mutations in ALS have been described as gain-of-function (5). The mechanism by which mutant SOD1 induces the neurodegeneration observed in ALS is still unclear. Mutant SOD1 proteins become misfolded and consequently oligomerize into high molecular weight species that aggregate and end up in proteinaceous inclusions (5).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Kinesin-like protein KIF1B is a member of the kinesin 3 family of C-kinesins that are characterized by a kinesin-motor domain in the carboxy-terminal region. As part of the general mechanism of kinesin-mediated cellular transport, C-kinesins are known to drive microtubule plus and minus end motilities (1-3). KIF1B is implicated in the transport of synaptic proteins to the cell periphery in neuronal cell axons by interaction with Rab3 guanine nucleotide exchange factor (3). Mitochondria are also often transported in axons by KIF1B (3-4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Kinesin superfamily proteins (KIFs) are molecular motors that drive directional, microtubule-dependent intracellular transport of membrane-bound organelles and other macromolecules (e.g. proteins, nucleic acids). The intracellular transport functions of KIFs are fundamentally important for a variety of cellular functions, including mitotic and meiotic division, motility/migration, hormone and neurotransmitter release, and differentiation (1-4). Disruptions to KIF-mediated intracellular transport have been linked with a variety of pathologies, ranging from tumorigenesis to defects in higher order brain function such as learning and memory (4-6).