20% off purchase of 3 or more products* | Learn More >>

Human Heat Shock Protein Binding

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Pig, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: HSPA8, alternately known as HSC70 or HSP73, is a constitutively expressed member of the HSP70 superfamily (1). Although its primary role in cells appears to be that of a general chaperone for unfolded proteins, HSPA8 has also been identified as the uncoating ATPase responsible for removing clathrin from coated vesicles and may also play a role in stabilizing untranslated mRNAs (1-5). In addition to these "housekeeping" functions, HSPA8 may also have an important role in inducible cellular stress responses. For example, oxidative or thermal stress promotes the nuclear/nucleolar accumulation of HSPA8, where it forms a complex with the topoisomerase I complex and likely protects it from heat inactivation (6,7). HSPA8 is reportedly phosphorylated in response to DNA damage, but it remains unclear what effect, if any, this has on HSPA8 function (8-10). Numerous high throughput studies support this observation. For more information, please see the HSPA8 page in PhosphoSitePlus® at www.phosphosite.org.

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: HSP70 and HSP90 are molecular chaperones expressed constitutively under normal conditions to maintain protein homeostasis and are induced upon environmental stress (1). Both HSP70 and HSP90 are able to interact with unfolded proteins to prevent irreversible aggregation and catalyze the refolding of their substrates in an ATP- and co-chaperone-dependent manner (1). HSP70 has a broad range of substrates including newly synthesized and denatured proteins, while HSP90 tends to have a more limited subset of substrates, most of which are signaling molecules. HSP70 and HSP90 often function collaboratively in a multi-chaperone system, which requires a minimal set of co-chaperones: HSP40, Hop, and p23 (2,3). The co-chaperones either regulate the intrinsic ATPase activity of the chaperones or recruit chaperones to specific substrates or subcellular compartments (1,4). When the ubiquitin ligase CHIP associates with the HSP70/HSP90 complex as a cofactor, the unfolded substrates are subjected to degradation by the proteasome (4). The biological functions of HSP70/HSP90 extend beyond their chaperone activity. They are essential for the maturation and inactivation of nuclear hormones and other signaling molecules (1,3). They also play a role in vesicle formation and protein trafficking (2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: HSP70 and HSP90 are molecular chaperones expressed constitutively under normal conditions to maintain protein homeostasis and are induced upon environmental stress (1). Both HSP70 and HSP90 are able to interact with unfolded proteins to prevent irreversible aggregation and catalyze the refolding of their substrates in an ATP- and co-chaperone-dependent manner (1). HSP70 has a broad range of substrates including newly synthesized and denatured proteins, while HSP90 tends to have a more limited subset of substrates, most of which are signaling molecules. HSP70 and HSP90 often function collaboratively in a multi-chaperone system, which requires a minimal set of co-chaperones: HSP40, Hop, and p23 (2,3). The co-chaperones either regulate the intrinsic ATPase activity of the chaperones or recruit chaperones to specific substrates or subcellular compartments (1,4). When the ubiquitin ligase CHIP associates with the HSP70/HSP90 complex as a cofactor, the unfolded substrates are subjected to degradation by the proteasome (4). The biological functions of HSP70/HSP90 extend beyond their chaperone activity. They are essential for the maturation and inactivation of nuclear hormones and other signaling molecules (1,3). They also play a role in vesicle formation and protein trafficking (2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: HSP70 and HSP90 are molecular chaperones expressed constitutively under normal conditions to maintain protein homeostasis and are induced upon environmental stress (1). Both HSP70 and HSP90 are able to interact with unfolded proteins to prevent irreversible aggregation and catalyze the refolding of their substrates in an ATP- and co-chaperone-dependent manner (1). HSP70 has a broad range of substrates including newly synthesized and denatured proteins, while HSP90 tends to have a more limited subset of substrates, most of which are signaling molecules. HSP70 and HSP90 often function collaboratively in a multi-chaperone system, which requires a minimal set of co-chaperones: HSP40, Hop, and p23 (2,3). The co-chaperones either regulate the intrinsic ATPase activity of the chaperones or recruit chaperones to specific substrates or subcellular compartments (1,4). When the ubiquitin ligase CHIP associates with the HSP70/HSP90 complex as a cofactor, the unfolded substrates are subjected to degradation by the proteasome (4). The biological functions of HSP70/HSP90 extend beyond their chaperone activity. They are essential for the maturation and inactivation of nuclear hormones and other signaling molecules (1,3). They also play a role in vesicle formation and protein trafficking (2).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: HSP70 and HSP90 are molecular chaperones expressed constitutively under normal conditions to maintain protein homeostasis and are induced upon environmental stress (1). Both HSP70 and HSP90 are able to interact with unfolded proteins to prevent irreversible aggregation and catalyze the refolding of their substrates in an ATP- and co-chaperone-dependent manner (1). HSP70 has a broad range of substrates including newly synthesized and denatured proteins, while HSP90 tends to have a more limited subset of substrates, most of which are signaling molecules. HSP70 and HSP90 often function collaboratively in a multi-chaperone system, which requires a minimal set of co-chaperones: HSP40, Hop, and p23 (2,3). The co-chaperones either regulate the intrinsic ATPase activity of the chaperones or recruit chaperones to specific substrates or subcellular compartments (1,4). When the ubiquitin ligase CHIP associates with the HSP70/HSP90 complex as a cofactor, the unfolded substrates are subjected to degradation by the proteasome (4). The biological functions of HSP70/HSP90 extend beyond their chaperone activity. They are essential for the maturation and inactivation of nuclear hormones and other signaling molecules (1,3). They also play a role in vesicle formation and protein trafficking (2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Grp75, also known as mortalin, is a member of Hsp70 family of chaperone proteins that is not heat-inducible (1,2). This protein is essential for transporting many mitochondrial proteins from the cytoplasm to mitochondria (3). Grp75 inactivates the tumor suppressor p53 (4). Studies found that Grp75 is overexpressed in many tumor tissues and immortalized human cell lines, suggesting its role in the tumor formation (5). Grp75 is also implicated in cell aging, as its overexpression appears to prolong the life span of human fibroblasts (6).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Grp75, also known as mortalin, is a member of Hsp70 family of chaperone proteins that is not heat-inducible (1,2). This protein is essential for transporting many mitochondrial proteins from the cytoplasm to mitochondria (3). Grp75 inactivates the tumor suppressor p53 (4). Studies found that Grp75 is overexpressed in many tumor tissues and immortalized human cell lines, suggesting its role in the tumor formation (5). Grp75 is also implicated in cell aging, as its overexpression appears to prolong the life span of human fibroblasts (6).

$108
250 PCR reactions
500 µl
SimpleChIP® Human HSPA6 Promoter Primers contain a mix of forward and reverse PCR primers that are specific to a region of the human heat shock protein 6 promoter bound by HSF1. These primers can be used to amplify DNA that has been isolated using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP). Primers have been optimized for use in SYBR® Green quantitative real-time PCR and have been tested in conjunction with SimpleChIP® Enzymatic Chromatin IP Kits #9002 and #9003 and ChIP-validated antibodies from Cell Signaling Technology®. The HSPA6 gene is rapidly induced by heat shock factors to help in refolding denatured proteins.
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: The chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay is a powerful and versatile technique used for probing protein-DNA interactions within the natural chromatin context of the cell (1,2). This assay can be used to either identify multiple proteins associated with a specific region of the genome or to identify the many regions of the genome bound by a particular protein (3-6). ChIP can be used to determine the specific order of recruitment of various proteins to a gene promoter or to "measure" the relative amount of a particular histone modification across an entire gene locus (3,4). In addition to histone proteins, the ChIP assay can be used to analyze binding of transcription factors and co-factors, DNA replication factors, and DNA repair proteins. When performing the ChIP assay, cells are first fixed with formaldehyde, a reversible protein-DNA cross-linking agent that "preserves" the protein-DNA interactions occurring in the cell (1,2). Cells are lysed and chromatin is harvested and fragmented using either sonication or enzymatic digestion. Fragmented chromatin is then immunoprecipitated with antibodies specific to a particular protein or histone modification. Any DNA sequences that are associated with the protein or histone modification of interest will co-precipitate as part of the cross-linked chromatin complex and the relative amount of that DNA sequence will be enriched by the immunoselection process. After immunoprecipitation, the protein-DNA cross-links are reversed and the DNA is purified. Standard PCR or quantitative real-time PCR are often used to measure the amount of enrichment of a particular DNA sequence by a protein-specific immunoprecipitation (1,2). Alternatively, the ChIP assay can be combined with genomic tiling micro-array (ChIP on chip) techniques, high throughput sequencing (ChIP-Seq), or cloning strategies, all of which allow for genome-wide analysis of protein-DNA interactions and histone modifications (5-8). SimpleChIP® primers have been optimized for amplification of ChIP-isolated DNA using real-time quantitative PCR and provide important positive and negative controls that can be used to confirm a successful ChIP experiment.

$108
250 PCR reactions
500 µl
SimpleChIP® Human HSP70 Intron 1 Primers contain a mix of forward and reverse PCR primers that are specific to intron 1 of the human heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) gene. These primers can be used to amplify DNA that has been isolated using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP). Primers have been optimized for use in SYBR® Green quantitative real-time PCR and have been tested in conjunction with SimpleChIP® Enzymatic Chromatin IP Kits #9002 and #9003 and ChIP-validated antibodies from Cell Signaling Technology®. The molecular chaperone HSP70 maintains protein homeostasis by interacting with newly synthesized and denatured unfolded proteins, preventing irreversible aggregation and catalyzing the refolding of their substrates in an ATP- and co-chaperone-dependent manner.
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: The chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay is a powerful and versatile technique used for probing protein-DNA interactions within the natural chromatin context of the cell (1,2). This assay can be used to either identify multiple proteins associated with a specific region of the genome or to identify the many regions of the genome bound by a particular protein (3-6). ChIP can be used to determine the specific order of recruitment of various proteins to a gene promoter or to "measure" the relative amount of a particular histone modification across an entire gene locus (3,4). In addition to histone proteins, the ChIP assay can be used to analyze binding of transcription factors and co-factors, DNA replication factors, and DNA repair proteins. When performing the ChIP assay, cells are first fixed with formaldehyde, a reversible protein-DNA cross-linking agent that "preserves" the protein-DNA interactions occurring in the cell (1,2). Cells are lysed and chromatin is harvested and fragmented using either sonication or enzymatic digestion. Fragmented chromatin is then immunoprecipitated with antibodies specific to a particular protein or histone modification. Any DNA sequences that are associated with the protein or histone modification of interest will co-precipitate as part of the cross-linked chromatin complex and the relative amount of that DNA sequence will be enriched by the immunoselection process. After immunoprecipitation, the protein-DNA cross-links are reversed and the DNA is purified. Standard PCR or quantitative real-time PCR are often used to measure the amount of enrichment of a particular DNA sequence by a protein-specific immunoprecipitation (1,2). Alternatively, the ChIP assay can be combined with genomic tiling micro-array (ChIP on chip) techniques, high throughput sequencing (ChIP-Seq), or cloning strategies, all of which allow for genome-wide analysis of protein-DNA interactions and histone modifications (5-8). SimpleChIP® primers have been optimized for amplification of ChIP-isolated DNA using real-time quantitative PCR and provide important positive and negative controls that can be used to confirm a successful ChIP experiment.

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex is a rate-regulating enzyme in the Krebs Cycle (1). Dihydrolipoamide succinyltransferase (DLST) is a key subunit in this complex (2). Reduction of DLST increases reactive oxygen species production, suggesting its role in oxidative stress (2). Research has shown that deficiency of DLST in mice is linked to increased oxidative stress in mitochondria, a process that may be involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex is a rate-regulating enzyme in the Krebs Cycle (1). Dihydrolipoamide succinyltransferase (DLST) is a key subunit in this complex (2). Reduction of DLST increases reactive oxygen species production, suggesting its role in oxidative stress (2). Research has shown that deficiency of DLST in mice is linked to increased oxidative stress in mitochondria, a process that may be involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex is a rate-regulating enzyme in the Krebs Cycle (1). Dihydrolipoamide succinyltransferase (DLST) is a key subunit in this complex (2). Reduction of DLST increases reactive oxygen species production, suggesting its role in oxidative stress (2). Research has shown that deficiency of DLST in mice is linked to increased oxidative stress in mitochondria, a process that may be involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase (OGDH) is one of three enzymes in the α ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (OGDC) that is responsible for catalyzing a rate-regulating step of the tricarboxylic acid (Krebs) cycle. Together with dihydrolipoamide S-succinyltransferase (DLST) and dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (DLD), OGDH helps to convert 2-oxoglutarate to succinyl-CoA and CO2 within eukaryotic mitochondria (1). Regulation of this enzyme complex is important for mitochondrial energy metabolism within cells (2). Research studies indicate that OGDH activity within the mitochondrial matrix is regulated by multiple factors, including calcium, the adenine nucleotides ATP and ADP, and NADH (2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: TFAM (Transcription Factor A, Mitochondrial; aka TCF6) is a member of the high-mobility group (HMG) proteins because it contains two HMG boxes. TFAM is a transcription factor for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), and enhances mtDNA transcription in a promoter-specific fashion in the presence of mitochondrial RNA polymerase and transcription factor B (1). Because the majority of ATP production depends on the mitochondrial respiratory chain, maintenance of the mitochondrial genome is critical for normal health. TFAM plays an essential role in the maintenance of mtDNA and thus, ATP production (2). TFAM binds to mtDNA both nonspecifically and in a sequence-specific manner. It is known to have a dual effect on mtDNA: protection of mtDNA and initiation of transcription from mtDNA (3). TFAM attenuates age-dependent impairment of the brain by preventing oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunctions in microglia (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: TFAM (Transcription Factor A, Mitochondrial; aka TCF6) is a member of the high-mobility group (HMG) proteins because it contains two HMG boxes. TFAM is a transcription factor for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), and enhances mtDNA transcription in a promoter-specific fashion in the presence of mitochondrial RNA polymerase and transcription factor B (1). Because the majority of ATP production depends on the mitochondrial respiratory chain, maintenance of the mitochondrial genome is critical for normal health. TFAM plays an essential role in the maintenance of mtDNA and thus, ATP production (2). TFAM binds to mtDNA both nonspecifically and in a sequence-specific manner. It is known to have a dual effect on mtDNA: protection of mtDNA and initiation of transcription from mtDNA (3). TFAM attenuates age-dependent impairment of the brain by preventing oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunctions in microglia (4).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Cofilin is a conserved actin-severing protein required for processes that rely on actin dynamics, including cytokinesis and cell motility (reviewed in 1). Regulation of actin dynamics requires the controlled cycling between the phosphorylated and unphosphorylated forms of cofilin (2). The severing activity of cofilin is inhibited by LIMK or TESK phosphorylation at the conserved amino-terminal Ser3 of cofilin (3,4). Slingshot (SSH) phosphatase, for which there have been three mammalian isoforms identified, dephosphorylates cofilin in vivo (5). Chronophin (CIN, PDXP) is a haloacid dehalogenase phosphatase that also dephosphorylates cofilin. Alteration of CIN activity through overexpression of either the wildtype or phosphatase-inactive mutant CIN interferes with actin dynamics, cell morphology and cytokinesis (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Human Tid-1 is a human orthologue of the Drosophila tumor suppressor lethal (2) tumorous imaginal discs, l (2) tid and is a member of the DnaJ family of proteins that serve as co-chaperones to Hsp70 proteins (1). These proteins are characterized by a J domain, a highly conserved tetrahelical domain that binds to Hsp70 chaperones and activates their ATPase activity. Hsp70 and their associated chaperones mediate a variety of activities including the folding of newly synthesized polypeptides, the translocation of proteins across membranes and assembly of multimeric protein complexes. Two alternatively spliced variants exist for human Tid-1 ,designated hTID-1s and hTID-1L, both which contain the J domain, localize to the mitochondrial matrix, and co-immunoprecipitate with Hsp70. Expression of Tid-1L increases apoptosis induced by the DNA damaging agent mitomycin c (MMC) and by TNF-alpha, and that activity is dependent on its J domain. In contrast, expression of Tid-1S reduces apoptosis by these agents. Tid-1 orthologues are also found in mouse (mTid-1) and rat (rTid-1) (2,3). The mouse orthologue was originally identified though its interaction with p120 GTPase-activating protein (GAP), raising the possiblity that Tid-1 helps regulates the confirmation, activity, or subcellular localization of GAP (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Apoptotic protease activating factor 1 (Apaf-1), originally identified as the mammalian homolog of the C. elegans apoptotic regulatory protein CED-4, is an important signaling protein involved in the activation of caspase-9 during apoptosis (1). Cytosolic Apaf-1 forms a complex with caspase-9 in the presence of cytochrome c and dATP, ultimately leading to caspase-9 activation and subsequent activation of caspase-3 (2,3). The protein contains an amino-terminal CARD domain, a central CED-4 homology domain, and multiple WD-40 repeats at the carboxy-terminus. Several isoforms of Apaf-1 are expressed through alternative splicing generating a small insert following the CARD domain as well as an extra WD-40 repeat (4). Apaf-1 knock-out mice display widespread defects in apoptosis and resistance to a variety of apoptotic stimuli (5,6).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Apoptotic protease activating factor 1 (Apaf-1), originally identified as the mammalian homolog of the C. elegans apoptotic regulatory protein CED-4, is an important signaling protein involved in the activation of caspase-9 during apoptosis (1). Cytosolic Apaf-1 forms a complex with caspase-9 in the presence of cytochrome c and dATP, ultimately leading to caspase-9 activation and subsequent activation of caspase-3 (2,3). The protein contains an amino-terminal CARD domain, a central CED-4 homology domain, and multiple WD-40 repeats at the carboxy-terminus. Several isoforms of Apaf-1 are expressed through alternative splicing generating a small insert following the CARD domain as well as an extra WD-40 repeat (4). Apaf-1 knock-out mice display widespread defects in apoptosis and resistance to a variety of apoptotic stimuli (5,6).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Apoptotic protease activating factor 1 (Apaf-1), originally identified as the mammalian homolog of the C. elegans apoptotic regulatory protein CED-4, is an important signaling protein involved in the activation of caspase-9 during apoptosis (1). Cytosolic Apaf-1 forms a complex with caspase-9 in the presence of cytochrome c and dATP, ultimately leading to caspase-9 activation and subsequent activation of caspase-3 (2,3). The protein contains an amino-terminal CARD domain, a central CED-4 homology domain, and multiple WD-40 repeats at the carboxy-terminus. Several isoforms of Apaf-1 are expressed through alternative splicing generating a small insert following the CARD domain as well as an extra WD-40 repeat (4). Apaf-1 knock-out mice display widespread defects in apoptosis and resistance to a variety of apoptotic stimuli (5,6).