20% off purchase of 3 or more products* | Learn More >>

Human Integral to Mitochondrial Outer Membrane

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: PTEN induced putative kinase 1, PINK1, is a mitochondrial serine/threonine kinase involved in the normal function and integrity of mitochondria, as well as in reduction of cytochrome c release from mitochondria (1-3). PINK1 phosphorylates Parkin and promotes its translocation to mitochondria (2). Research studies have shown that mutations in PINK1 are linked to autosomal recessive early onset Parkinson’s disease, and are associated with loss of protective function, mitochondrial dysfunction, aggregation of α-synuclein, as well as proteasome dysfunction (1,3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Bak is a proapoptotic member of the Bcl-2 family (1). This protein is located on the outer membrane of mitochondria and is an essential component for transduction of apoptotic signals through the mitochondrial pathway (2,3). Upon apoptotic stimulation, an upstream stimulator like truncated BID (tBID) induces conformational changes in Bak to form oligomer channels in the mitochondrial membrane for cytochrome c release. The release of cytochrome c to the cytosol activates the caspase-9 pathway and eventually leads to cell death (4,5).

$262
3 nmol
300 µl
SignalSilence® Bak siRNA I from Cell Signaling Technology (CST) allows the researcher to specifically inhibit Bak expression using RNA interference, a method whereby gene expression can be selectively silenced through the delivery of double stranded RNA molecules into the cell. All SignalSilence® siRNA products from CST are rigorously tested in-house and have been shown to reduce target protein expression by western analysis.
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: Bak is a proapoptotic member of the Bcl-2 family (1). This protein is located on the outer membrane of mitochondria and is an essential component for transduction of apoptotic signals through the mitochondrial pathway (2,3). Upon apoptotic stimulation, an upstream stimulator like truncated BID (tBID) induces conformational changes in Bak to form oligomer channels in the mitochondrial membrane for cytochrome c release. The release of cytochrome c to the cytosol activates the caspase-9 pathway and eventually leads to cell death (4,5).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Bak (D4E4) Rabbit mAb #12105.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Bak is a proapoptotic member of the Bcl-2 family (1). This protein is located on the outer membrane of mitochondria and is an essential component for transduction of apoptotic signals through the mitochondrial pathway (2,3). Upon apoptotic stimulation, an upstream stimulator like truncated BID (tBID) induces conformational changes in Bak to form oligomer channels in the mitochondrial membrane for cytochrome c release. The release of cytochrome c to the cytosol activates the caspase-9 pathway and eventually leads to cell death (4,5).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Bak is a proapoptotic member of the Bcl-2 family (1). This protein is located on the outer membrane of mitochondria and is an essential component for transduction of apoptotic signals through the mitochondrial pathway (2,3). Upon apoptotic stimulation, an upstream stimulator like truncated BID (tBID) induces conformational changes in Bak to form oligomer channels in the mitochondrial membrane for cytochrome c release. The release of cytochrome c to the cytosol activates the caspase-9 pathway and eventually leads to cell death (4,5).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Bak is a proapoptotic member of the Bcl-2 family (1). This protein is located on the outer membrane of mitochondria and is an essential component for transduction of apoptotic signals through the mitochondrial pathway (2,3). Upon apoptotic stimulation, an upstream stimulator like truncated BID (tBID) induces conformational changes in Bak to form oligomer channels in the mitochondrial membrane for cytochrome c release. The release of cytochrome c to the cytosol activates the caspase-9 pathway and eventually leads to cell death (4,5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: BNIP3 (Bcl-2/E1B-19kDa interacting protein 3) is a pro-apoptotic mitochondrial protein and Bcl-2 family member that contains a Bcl-2 homology 3 (BH3) domain and a carboxyl-terminal transmembrane (TM) domain (1-3). While BNIP3 has a predicted molecular weight of about 22 kDa, it runs anomalously on SDS-PAGE and includes a band of around 60 kDa that may be a dimeric form that is not reduced (2). BNIP3 associates with anti-apoptotic family members Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, and the adenovirus homologue E1B-19kDa. BNIP3 is distinct from other Bcl-2 family members that contain only the BH3 domain in that the TM domain, and not the BH3 domain, is required for mitochondrial targeting and pro-apoptotic activity (4). In addition to apoptosis, BNIP3 has been implicated in necrosis (5) and autophagy (6-11). In hypoxic conditions, BNIP3 can induce mitochondrial autophagy (mitophagy) by disrupting the Bcl-2-Beclin-1 complex (9). BNIP3 can also promote mitophagy by triggering the translocation of the E3 ubiquitin ligase Parkin to the mitochondria (10) or by directly binding LC3 on the autophagosome (11). BNIP3 may also localize to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) where it can selectively induce the autophagic clearance of ER (ERphagy) (11). Increased expression of BNIP3 under hypoxic conditions is mainly regulated by the transcription factor HIF-1α (12-14). Silencing of the BNIP3 promoter by methylation has been observed in several types of cancer cells and may play an important role in their survival (14-18).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 (CPT1), localized to the mitochondrial outer membrane, translocates fatty acids across the mitochondrial membranes and catalyzes the rate-limiting step of β-oxidation (1, 2). There are three isoforms of this enzyme: CPT1A (liver), CPT1B (muscle), and CPT1C (brain) (1, 2). Deficiency of CPT1A results in an autosomal recessive mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation disorder (3). Studies have shown that physiological high blood glucose and insulin levels inhibit CPT1B activity in human muscle and therefore divert long-chain fatty acids toward storage in human muscle as triglycerides (4). Furthermore, mice deficient in CPT1C show less food intake and reduced body weight (5). These findings suggest that CPT1 may play a role in metabolic syndromes.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Mitochondrial Rho GTPase 1 (Miro1, RHOT1) and mitochondrial Rho GTPase 2 (Miro2, RHOT2) are atypical Ras GTPase proteins that localize to the outer mitochondrial membrane (1,2). These evolutionarily conserved proteins contain GTP-binding domains and a pair of calcium-binding EF hand domains (1,2). Research studies indicate that Miro1 and Miro2 function in the axonal transport of mitochondria in neurons (2). Both Miro proteins play an essential role in mitochondrial trafficking by attaching mitochondria to essential motor and adaptor proteins (3). Miro GTPase proteins that are anchored to the outer mitochondrial membrane interact with kinesin-binding proteins TRAK1 and TRAK2 to provide a link between mitochondria to microtubules (4). Increased levels of synaptic calcium appears to inhibit mitochondrial trafficking mediated by Miro, suggesting a role for the EF hand as a calcium sensor (5).

$305
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to the carbohydrate groups of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) via its amine groups. The HRP conjugated antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Tom20 (D8T4N) Rabbit mAb #42406.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Mitochondria play a central role in cellular energy metabolism and are essential organelles in eukaryotes. In humans, 13 proteins are encoded by the mitochondrial genome while the vast majority of mitochondrial proteins are encoded by the nuclear genome. As a result, most mitochondrial proteins are synthesized as precursors in the cytoplasm and imported across mitochondrial membranes by one or more translocase protein complexes (1). The translocase of the outer mitochondrial membrane (TOM complex) facilitates the import of proteins through the outer mitochondrial membrane, while the complementary translocase of the inner membrane (TIM complex) is responsible for protein transport to the mitochondrial matrix. The TOM complex consists of the receptors Tom20, Tom22, and Tom70, and the channel-forming protein Tom40 (1). Tom20 is localized in the outer mitochondrial membrane and initially recognizes precursors with a presequence to facilitate protein import across the outer mitochondrial membrane (2). In a sequential process, recognition of the presequence by Tom20 is followed by tethering of the presequence to the Tom40 protein complex for efficient protein import (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Mitochondria play a central role in cellular energy metabolism and are essential organelles in eukaryotes. In humans, 13 proteins are encoded by the mitochondrial genome while the vast majority of mitochondrial proteins are encoded by the nuclear genome. As a result, most mitochondrial proteins are synthesized as precursors in the cytoplasm and imported across mitochondrial membranes by one or more translocase protein complexes (1). The translocase of the outer mitochondrial membrane (TOM complex) facilitates the import of proteins through the outer mitochondrial membrane, while the complementary translocase of the inner membrane (TIM complex) is responsible for protein transport to the mitochondrial matrix. The TOM complex consists of the receptors Tom20, Tom22, and Tom70, and the channel-forming protein Tom40 (1). Tom20 is localized in the outer mitochondrial membrane and initially recognizes precursors with a presequence to facilitate protein import across the outer mitochondrial membrane (2). In a sequential process, recognition of the presequence by Tom20 is followed by tethering of the presequence to the Tom40 protein complex for efficient protein import (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Mitofusins are mitochondrial transmembrane GTPases that function to regulate mitochondrial fusion, a process that occurs in concert with mitochondrial division and is necessary for the maintenance of structural and genetic mitochondrial integrity (1,2). Two mitofusins have been described in mammals, mitofusin-1 and -2, which share 60% amino acid identity and appear to function coordinately to regulate mitochondrial fusion (3). Mitochondrial fusion is widely recognized as important for normal cell growth and development (4), and may have evolved as a mechanism to offset the deleterious effects of mtDNA mutations (3). Null mutations in either mitofusin are embryonic lethal in mice, whereas conditional knockout studies have shown that combined deletion of mitofusin-1 and mitofusin-2 in skeletal muscle results in severe mitochondrial dysfunction (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Mcl-1 is an anti-apoptotic member of the Bcl-2 family originally isolated from the ML-1 human myeloid leukemia cell line during phorbol ester-induced differentiation along the monocyte/macrophage pathway (1). Similar to other Bcl-2 family members, Mcl-1 localizes to the mitochondria (2), interacts with and antagonizes pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members (3), and inhibits apoptosis induced by a number of cytotoxic stimuli (4). Mcl-1 differs from its other family members in its regulation at both the transcriptional and post-translational level. First, Mcl-1 has an extended amino-terminal PEST region, which is responsible for its relatively short half-life (1,2). Second, unlike other family members, Mcl-1 is rapidly transcribed via a PI3K/Akt dependent pathway, resulting in its increased expression during myeloid differentiation and cytokine stimulation (1,5-7). Mcl-1 is phosphorylated in response to treatment with phorbol ester, microtubule-damaging agents, oxidative stress, and cytokine withdrawal (8-11). Phosphorylation at Thr163, the conserved MAP kinase/ERK site located within the PEST region, slows Mcl-1 protein turnover (10) but may prime the GSK-3 mediated phosphorylation at Ser159 that leads to Mcl-1 destabilization (11). Mcl-1 deficiency in mice results in peri-implantation lethality (12). In addition, conditional disruption of the corresponding mcl-1 gene shows that Mcl-1 plays an important role in early lymphoid development and in the maintenance of mature lymphocytes (13).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Mcl-1 is an anti-apoptotic member of the Bcl-2 family originally isolated from the ML-1 human myeloid leukemia cell line during phorbol ester-induced differentiation along the monocyte/macrophage pathway (1). Similar to other Bcl-2 family members, Mcl-1 localizes to the mitochondria (2), interacts with and antagonizes pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members (3), and inhibits apoptosis induced by a number of cytotoxic stimuli (4). Mcl-1 differs from its other family members in its regulation at both the transcriptional and post-translational level. First, Mcl-1 has an extended amino-terminal PEST region, which is responsible for its relatively short half-life (1,2). Second, unlike other family members, Mcl-1 is rapidly transcribed via a PI3K/Akt dependent pathway, resulting in its increased expression during myeloid differentiation and cytokine stimulation (1,5-7). Mcl-1 is phosphorylated in response to treatment with phorbol ester, microtubule-damaging agents, oxidative stress, and cytokine withdrawal (8-11). Phosphorylation at Thr163, the conserved MAP kinase/ERK site located within the PEST region, slows Mcl-1 protein turnover (10) but may prime the GSK-3 mediated phosphorylation at Ser159 that leads to Mcl-1 destabilization (11). Mcl-1 deficiency in mice results in peri-implantation lethality (12). In addition, conditional disruption of the corresponding mcl-1 gene shows that Mcl-1 plays an important role in early lymphoid development and in the maintenance of mature lymphocytes (13).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Mcl-1 is an anti-apoptotic member of the Bcl-2 family originally isolated from the ML-1 human myeloid leukemia cell line during phorbol ester-induced differentiation along the monocyte/macrophage pathway (1). Similar to other Bcl-2 family members, Mcl-1 localizes to the mitochondria (2), interacts with and antagonizes pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members (3), and inhibits apoptosis induced by a number of cytotoxic stimuli (4). Mcl-1 differs from its other family members in its regulation at both the transcriptional and post-translational level. First, Mcl-1 has an extended amino-terminal PEST region, which is responsible for its relatively short half-life (1,2). Second, unlike other family members, Mcl-1 is rapidly transcribed via a PI3K/Akt dependent pathway, resulting in its increased expression during myeloid differentiation and cytokine stimulation (1,5-7). Mcl-1 is phosphorylated in response to treatment with phorbol ester, microtubule-damaging agents, oxidative stress, and cytokine withdrawal (8-11). Phosphorylation at Thr163, the conserved MAP kinase/ERK site located within the PEST region, slows Mcl-1 protein turnover (10) but may prime the GSK-3 mediated phosphorylation at Ser159 that leads to Mcl-1 destabilization (11). Mcl-1 deficiency in mice results in peri-implantation lethality (12). In addition, conditional disruption of the corresponding mcl-1 gene shows that Mcl-1 plays an important role in early lymphoid development and in the maintenance of mature lymphocytes (13).

$262
3 nmol
300 µl
SignalSilence® Mcl-1 siRNA I from Cell Signaling Technology (CST) allows the researcher to specifically inhibit Mcl-1 expression using RNA interference, a method whereby gene expression can be selectively silenced through the delivery of double stranded RNA molecules into the cell. All SignalSilence® siRNA products from CST are rigorously tested in-house and have been shown to reduce target protein expression by western analysis.
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: Mcl-1 is an anti-apoptotic member of the Bcl-2 family originally isolated from the ML-1 human myeloid leukemia cell line during phorbol ester-induced differentiation along the monocyte/macrophage pathway (1). Similar to other Bcl-2 family members, Mcl-1 localizes to the mitochondria (2), interacts with and antagonizes pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members (3), and inhibits apoptosis induced by a number of cytotoxic stimuli (4). Mcl-1 differs from its other family members in its regulation at both the transcriptional and post-translational level. First, Mcl-1 has an extended amino-terminal PEST region, which is responsible for its relatively short half-life (1,2). Second, unlike other family members, Mcl-1 is rapidly transcribed via a PI3K/Akt dependent pathway, resulting in its increased expression during myeloid differentiation and cytokine stimulation (1,5-7). Mcl-1 is phosphorylated in response to treatment with phorbol ester, microtubule-damaging agents, oxidative stress, and cytokine withdrawal (8-11). Phosphorylation at Thr163, the conserved MAP kinase/ERK site located within the PEST region, slows Mcl-1 protein turnover (10) but may prime the GSK-3 mediated phosphorylation at Ser159 that leads to Mcl-1 destabilization (11). Mcl-1 deficiency in mice results in peri-implantation lethality (12). In addition, conditional disruption of the corresponding mcl-1 gene shows that Mcl-1 plays an important role in early lymphoid development and in the maintenance of mature lymphocytes (13).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Mitofusins are mitochondrial transmembrane GTPases that function to regulate mitochondrial fusion, a process that occurs in concert with mitochondrial division and is necessary for the maintenance of structural and genetic mitochondrial integrity (1,2). Two mitofusins have been described in mammals, mitofusin-1 and -2, which share 60% amino acid identity and appear to function coordinately to regulate mitochondrial fusion (3). Mitochondrial fusion is widely recognized as important for normal cell growth and development (4), and may have evolved as a mechanism to offset the deleterious effects of mtDNA mutations (3). Null mutations in either mitofusin are embryonic lethal in mice, whereas conditional knockout studies have shown that combined deletion of mitofusin-1 and mitofusin-2 in skeletal muscle results in severe mitochondrial dysfunction (3).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Mcl-1 is an anti-apoptotic member of the Bcl-2 family originally isolated from the ML-1 human myeloid leukemia cell line during phorbol ester-induced differentiation along the monocyte/macrophage pathway (1). Similar to other Bcl-2 family members, Mcl-1 localizes to the mitochondria (2), interacts with and antagonizes pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members (3), and inhibits apoptosis induced by a number of cytotoxic stimuli (4). Mcl-1 differs from its other family members in its regulation at both the transcriptional and post-translational level. First, Mcl-1 has an extended amino-terminal PEST region, which is responsible for its relatively short half-life (1,2). Second, unlike other family members, Mcl-1 is rapidly transcribed via a PI3K/Akt dependent pathway, resulting in its increased expression during myeloid differentiation and cytokine stimulation (1,5-7). Mcl-1 is phosphorylated in response to treatment with phorbol ester, microtubule-damaging agents, oxidative stress, and cytokine withdrawal (8-11). Phosphorylation at Thr163, the conserved MAP kinase/ERK site located within the PEST region, slows Mcl-1 protein turnover (10) but may prime the GSK-3 mediated phosphorylation at Ser159 that leads to Mcl-1 destabilization (11). Mcl-1 deficiency in mice results in peri-implantation lethality (12). In addition, conditional disruption of the corresponding mcl-1 gene shows that Mcl-1 plays an important role in early lymphoid development and in the maintenance of mature lymphocytes (13).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Mcl-1 is an anti-apoptotic member of the Bcl-2 family originally isolated from the ML-1 human myeloid leukemia cell line during phorbol ester-induced differentiation along the monocyte/macrophage pathway (1). Similar to other Bcl-2 family members, Mcl-1 localizes to the mitochondria (2), interacts with and antagonizes pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members (3), and inhibits apoptosis induced by a number of cytotoxic stimuli (4). Mcl-1 differs from its other family members in its regulation at both the transcriptional and post-translational level. First, Mcl-1 has an extended amino-terminal PEST region, which is responsible for its relatively short half-life (1,2). Second, unlike other family members, Mcl-1 is rapidly transcribed via a PI3K/Akt dependent pathway, resulting in its increased expression during myeloid differentiation and cytokine stimulation (1,5-7). Mcl-1 is phosphorylated in response to treatment with phorbol ester, microtubule-damaging agents, oxidative stress, and cytokine withdrawal (8-11). Phosphorylation at Thr163, the conserved MAP kinase/ERK site located within the PEST region, slows Mcl-1 protein turnover (10) but may prime the GSK-3 mediated phosphorylation at Ser159 that leads to Mcl-1 destabilization (11). Mcl-1 deficiency in mice results in peri-implantation lethality (12). In addition, conditional disruption of the corresponding mcl-1 gene shows that Mcl-1 plays an important role in early lymphoid development and in the maintenance of mature lymphocytes (13).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Mcl-1 is an anti-apoptotic member of the Bcl-2 family originally isolated from the ML-1 human myeloid leukemia cell line during phorbol ester-induced differentiation along the monocyte/macrophage pathway (1). Similar to other Bcl-2 family members, Mcl-1 localizes to the mitochondria (2), interacts with and antagonizes pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members (3), and inhibits apoptosis induced by a number of cytotoxic stimuli (4). Mcl-1 differs from its other family members in its regulation at both the transcriptional and post-translational level. First, Mcl-1 has an extended amino-terminal PEST region, which is responsible for its relatively short half-life (1,2). Second, unlike other family members, Mcl-1 is rapidly transcribed via a PI3K/Akt dependent pathway, resulting in its increased expression during myeloid differentiation and cytokine stimulation (1,5-7). Mcl-1 is phosphorylated in response to treatment with phorbol ester, microtubule-damaging agents, oxidative stress, and cytokine withdrawal (8-11). Phosphorylation at Thr163, the conserved MAP kinase/ERK site located within the PEST region, slows Mcl-1 protein turnover (10) but may prime the GSK-3 mediated phosphorylation at Ser159 that leads to Mcl-1 destabilization (11). Mcl-1 deficiency in mice results in peri-implantation lethality (12). In addition, conditional disruption of the corresponding mcl-1 gene shows that Mcl-1 plays an important role in early lymphoid development and in the maintenance of mature lymphocytes (13).