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Human Intercellular Bridge

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
$717
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) is one of the earliest events in a cascade that controls a variety of cellular responses, including secretion, gene expression, proliferation, and muscle contraction (1,2). PKC isoforms belong to three groups based on calcium dependency and activators. Classical PKCs are calcium-dependent via their C2 domains and are activated by phosphatidylserine (PS), diacylglycerol (DAG), and phorbol esters (TPA, PMA) through their cysteine-rich C1 domains. Both novel and atypical PKCs are calcium-independent, but only novel PKCs are activated by PS, DAG, and phorbol esters (3-5). Members of these three PKC groups contain a pseudo-substrate or autoinhibitory domain that binds to substrate-binding sites in the catalytic domain to prevent activation in the absence of cofactors or activators. Control of PKC activity is regulated through three distinct phosphorylation events. Phosphorylation occurs in vivo at Thr500 in the activation loop, at Thr641 through autophosphorylation, and at the carboxy-terminal hydrophobic site Ser660 (2). Atypical PKC isoforms lack hydrophobic region phosphorylation, which correlates with the presence of glutamic acid rather than the serine or threonine residues found in more typical PKC isoforms. The enzyme PDK1 or a close relative is responsible for PKC activation. A recent addition to the PKC superfamily is PKCμ (PKD), which is regulated by DAG and TPA through its C1 domain. PKD is distinguished by the presence of a PH domain and by its unique substrate recognition and Golgi localization (6). PKC-related kinases (PRK) lack the C1 domain and do not respond to DAG or phorbol esters. Phosphatidylinositol lipids activate PRKs, and small Rho-family GTPases bind to the homology region 1 (HR1) to regulate PRK kinase activity (7).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) is one of the earliest events in a cascade that controls a variety of cellular responses, including secretion, gene expression, proliferation, and muscle contraction (1,2). PKC isoforms belong to three groups based on calcium dependency and activators. Classical PKCs are calcium-dependent via their C2 domains and are activated by phosphatidylserine (PS), diacylglycerol (DAG), and phorbol esters (TPA, PMA) through their cysteine-rich C1 domains. Both novel and atypical PKCs are calcium-independent, but only novel PKCs are activated by PS, DAG, and phorbol esters (3-5). Members of these three PKC groups contain a pseudo-substrate or autoinhibitory domain that binds to substrate-binding sites in the catalytic domain to prevent activation in the absence of cofactors or activators. Control of PKC activity is regulated through three distinct phosphorylation events. Phosphorylation occurs in vivo at Thr500 in the activation loop, at Thr641 through autophosphorylation, and at the carboxy-terminal hydrophobic site Ser660 (2). Atypical PKC isoforms lack hydrophobic region phosphorylation, which correlates with the presence of glutamic acid rather than the serine or threonine residues found in more typical PKC isoforms. The enzyme PDK1 or a close relative is responsible for PKC activation. A recent addition to the PKC superfamily is PKCμ (PKD), which is regulated by DAG and TPA through its C1 domain. PKD is distinguished by the presence of a PH domain and by its unique substrate recognition and Golgi localization (6). PKC-related kinases (PRK) lack the C1 domain and do not respond to DAG or phorbol esters. Phosphatidylinositol lipids activate PRKs, and small Rho-family GTPases bind to the homology region 1 (HR1) to regulate PRK kinase activity (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Western Blotting

Background: Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) is one of the earliest events in a cascade that controls a variety of cellular responses, including secretion, gene expression, proliferation, and muscle contraction (1,2). PKC isoforms belong to three groups based on calcium dependency and activators. Classical PKCs are calcium-dependent via their C2 domains and are activated by phosphatidylserine (PS), diacylglycerol (DAG), and phorbol esters (TPA, PMA) through their cysteine-rich C1 domains. Both novel and atypical PKCs are calcium-independent, but only novel PKCs are activated by PS, DAG, and phorbol esters (3-5). Members of these three PKC groups contain a pseudo-substrate or autoinhibitory domain that binds to substrate-binding sites in the catalytic domain to prevent activation in the absence of cofactors or activators. Control of PKC activity is regulated through three distinct phosphorylation events. Phosphorylation occurs in vivo at Thr500 in the activation loop, at Thr641 through autophosphorylation, and at the carboxy-terminal hydrophobic site Ser660 (2). Atypical PKC isoforms lack hydrophobic region phosphorylation, which correlates with the presence of glutamic acid rather than the serine or threonine residues found in more typical PKC isoforms. The enzyme PDK1 or a close relative is responsible for PKC activation. A recent addition to the PKC superfamily is PKCμ (PKD), which is regulated by DAG and TPA through its C1 domain. PKD is distinguished by the presence of a PH domain and by its unique substrate recognition and Golgi localization (6). PKC-related kinases (PRK) lack the C1 domain and do not respond to DAG or phorbol esters. Phosphatidylinositol lipids activate PRKs, and small Rho-family GTPases bind to the homology region 1 (HR1) to regulate PRK kinase activity (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin)

Background: CD34 is a type I transmembrane glycophosphoprotein expressed by hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells, vascular endothelium and some fibroblasts (1). CD34 expression has been the hallmark used to identify hematopoietic stem cells for many years. CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells expand and differentiate into all the lymphohematopoietic lineages upon cytokine or growth factor stimulation and lose CD34 expression upon differentiation. However, recent studies performed in various laboratories conflict with that convention (2). The extracellular domain of CD34 is homologous to CD43, a protein involved in cell-cell adhesion, and CD34 has been shown to function as a negative regulator of cell adhesion (3). CD34 associates with CrkL but not CrkII, is a substrate for PKC, and activation of PKC is coupled with surface expression of CD34 (1,4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Western Blotting

Background: SIN3 was originally identified as a negative regulator of transcription in budding yeast (1,2). Since then, three isoforms of the SIN3 proteins have been identified in mammalian cells, as products of two different genes, SIN3A and SIN3B (3,4). Both SIN3A and SIN3B are nuclear proteins that function as scaffolding subunits for the multi-subunit SIN3 transcriptional repressor complex, containing SIN3A or SIN3B, HDAC1, HDAC2, SDS3, RBBP4/RBAP48, RBBP7/RBAP46, SAP30, and SAP18 (3,4). SIN3 proteins contain four paired amphipathic alpha-helix (PAH) motifs that function in the recruitment of the SIN3 complex to target genes by binding a multitude of DNA-binding transcriptional repressor proteins, including Mad1, p53, E2F4, HCF-1, AML1, Elk-1, NRSF, CTCF, ERα, and MeCP2 (3,4). In addition, SIN3 proteins contain an HDAC interaction domain (HID), which mediates binding of HDAC1 and HDAC2 via the SDS3 bridging protein, and a highly conserved region (HCR) at the carboxy terminus, which contributes to repressor protein binding (3,4). RBBP4 and RBBP7 proteins also bind to SDS3 and contribute to nucleosome binding of the complex. The SIN3 complex functions to repress transcription, in part, by deacetylating histones at target gene promoters (3,4). In addition, recent studies have shown that SIN3 is recruited to the coding regions of repressed and active genes, where it deacetylates histones and suppresses spurious transcription by RNA polymerase II (3,5). In addition to histone deacetylase activity, the SIN3 complex associates with histone methyltransferase (ESET), histone demethylase (JARID1A/RBP2), ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling (SWI/SNF), methylcytosine dioxygenase (TET1), and O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) activities, all of which appear to contribute to the regulation of target genes (5-9). The SIN3 complex is critical for proper regulation of embryonic development, cell growth and proliferation, apoptosis, DNA replication, DNA repair, and DNA methylation (imprinting and X-chromosome inactivation) (3,4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Thanatos-associated protein (Thap) proteins are a family of cellular factors that are characterized by an evolutionarily conserved protein motif similar to the DNA-binding domain of Drosophila P element transposase (1). There are 12 known human Thap proteins that all act as site-specific DNA-binding factors involved in transcriptional regulation, cell proliferation, chromatin modification, and apoptosis (2-4). Human Thap11 has been shown to suppress cell growth through transcriptional suppression of c-Myc (5). The mouse homolog of Thap11, Ronin, has been identified as an essential factor underlying embryogenesis in mouse embryonic stem cells (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Western Blotting

Background: The estrogen-related receptor (ERR) subfamily of orphan nuclear receptors include three protein receptors, ERRα/NR3B1, ERRβ/NR3B2, and ERRγ/NR3B3, that have yet to be associated with natural ligands. PGC-1 coactivators regulate ERR transcription activation ability and receptor-induced transcription of genes involved in lipid metabolism, glucose metabolism, and mitochondrial biogenesis (1).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated CD34 (ICO115) Mouse mAb #3569.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: CD34 is a type I transmembrane glycophosphoprotein expressed by hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells, vascular endothelium and some fibroblasts (1). CD34 expression has been the hallmark used to identify hematopoietic stem cells for many years. CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells expand and differentiate into all the lymphohematopoietic lineages upon cytokine or growth factor stimulation and lose CD34 expression upon differentiation. However, recent studies performed in various laboratories conflict with that convention (2). The extracellular domain of CD34 is homologous to CD43, a protein involved in cell-cell adhesion, and CD34 has been shown to function as a negative regulator of cell adhesion (3). CD34 associates with CrkL but not CrkII, is a substrate for PKC, and activation of PKC is coupled with surface expression of CD34 (1,4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The expansion of hexanucleotide GGGGCC repeats in the C9orf72 gene causes chromosome 9p-linked neurodegenerative diseases amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) (1,2). The specific mechanism by which of these repeats contributes to disease etiology is currently an active area of investigation (3). Several gain of function mechanisms have been proposed. These mechanisms include toxicity from C9orf72 RNA containing the hexanucleotide repeats (4) and toxicity generated from dipeptide repeat proteins produced by repeat-associated non-ATG translation (5). In addition to gain of function mechanisms, the genetic hexanucleotide repeat expansions may cause a loss of function of the C9orf72 protein. C9orf72 contains a predicted DENN (differentially expressed in normal and neoplastic cells) domain that typically functions as guanine exchange factors for Rab GTPases, proteins that play key regulatory roles in membrane trafficking (6). Consistent with C9orf72 normally functioning in membrane trafficking, biochemical and genetic studies revealed that C9orf72 forms a protein complex with Sim-Magenis chromosome region 8 (SMCR8) and WD repeat-containing protein 41 (WDR41) to regulate the autophagy-lysosomal pathway (7), suggesting that C9orf72-dependent alterations in the autophagy-lysosomal pathway might contribute to ALS/FTD pathology.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The initiation of DNA replication in mammalian cells is a highly coordinated process that ensures duplication of the genome only once per cell division cycle. Origins of replication are dispersed throughout the genome, and their activities are regulated via the sequential binding of pre-replication and replication factors. The origin recognition complex (ORC) is thought to be bound to chromatin throughout the cell cycle (1,2). The pre-replication complex (Pre-RC) forms in late mitosis/early G1 phase beginning with the binding of cdt1 and cdc6 to the origin, which allows binding of the heterohexameric MCM2-7 complex. The MCM complex is thought to be the replicative helicase, and formation of the pre-RC is referred to as chromatin licensing. Subsequent initiation of DNA replication requires the activation of the S-phase promoting kinases cdk2 and cdc7. Cdc7, which is active only in complex with its regulatory subunit dbf4, phosphorylates MCM proteins bound to chromatin and allows binding of the replication factor cdc45 and DNA polymerase (3,4).The import of cdc7 to the nucleus is regulated by importin-β (5) and its binding to the origin of replication is dependent on the regulation of its localization via three domains, a nuclear localization sequence (NLS), a nuclear retention sequence (NRS) and a nuclear export sequence (NES) (6).Expression of cdc7 and dbf4 has been shown to be increased in human cancer cell lines and tissue (7); a chemical inhibitor of cdc7 blocks initiation of DNA replication and causes apoptosis in cancer cells (8).Cdc7 is also involved in activating ATR/Chk1 in response to DNA damage (9,10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: SIN3 was originally identified as a negative regulator of transcription in budding yeast (1,2). Since then, three isoforms of the SIN3 proteins have been identified in mammalian cells, as products of two different genes, SIN3A and SIN3B (3,4). Both SIN3A and SIN3B are nuclear proteins that function as scaffolding subunits for the multi-subunit SIN3 transcriptional repressor complex, containing SIN3A or SIN3B, HDAC1, HDAC2, SDS3, RBBP4/RBAP48, RBBP7/RBAP46, SAP30, and SAP18 (3,4). SIN3 proteins contain four paired amphipathic alpha-helix (PAH) motifs that function in the recruitment of the SIN3 complex to target genes by binding a multitude of DNA-binding transcriptional repressor proteins, including Mad1, p53, E2F4, HCF-1, AML1, Elk-1, NRSF, CTCF, ERα, and MeCP2 (3,4). In addition, SIN3 proteins contain an HDAC interaction domain (HID), which mediates binding of HDAC1 and HDAC2 via the SDS3 bridging protein, and a highly conserved region (HCR) at the carboxy terminus, which contributes to repressor protein binding (3,4). RBBP4 and RBBP7 proteins also bind to SDS3 and contribute to nucleosome binding of the complex. The SIN3 complex functions to repress transcription, in part, by deacetylating histones at target gene promoters (3,4). In addition, recent studies have shown that SIN3 is recruited to the coding regions of repressed and active genes, where it deacetylates histones and suppresses spurious transcription by RNA polymerase II (3,5). In addition to histone deacetylase activity, the SIN3 complex associates with histone methyltransferase (ESET), histone demethylase (JARID1A/RBP2), ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling (SWI/SNF), methylcytosine dioxygenase (TET1), and O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) activities, all of which appear to contribute to the regulation of target genes (5-9). The SIN3 complex is critical for proper regulation of embryonic development, cell growth and proliferation, apoptosis, DNA replication, DNA repair, and DNA methylation (imprinting and X-chromosome inactivation) (3,4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Rab35 belongs to the small GTPase superfamily. By interacting with its specific GEF or GAP, Rab35 regulates cargo-specific endocytosis at the vesicle recycling step or mediates exocytosis at the exosome docking/tethering step (1-4). During cytokinesis, Rab35 interacts with OCRL phosphatase and is essential for maintaining intercellular bridge stability and abscission by controlling the concentration of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) and SEPT2 localization at the intercellular bridge (5,6). Rab35 also plays a role in actin assembly and the recruitment of Cdc42 and Rac1 to the site of filopodium by its direct interaction with actin-bundling protein fascin and actin-binding protein connecdenn 3 (7-9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: ETS-1 is a proto-oncoprotein that belongs to the E26 Transformation-specific Sequence (ETS) family of transcription factors that share a unique and highly conserved DNA binding domain (1). ETS-1 plays important roles in vascular development and angiogenesis (2), and vascular inflammation and remodeling (3). The target genes of ETS-1 include receptor tyrosine kinases, MMPs, and cell adhesion molecules (4-6). In addition, ETS-1 is involved in regulation of energy metabolism in cancer cells (7). ETS-1 activity is regulated by two different types of phosphorylation sites. While phosphorylation at a cluster of serine residues in the exon VII domain by CaMKII inhibits ETS-1 DNA binding activity (8), phosphorylation at its Thr38 site by Ras activates ETS-1 (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is a process by which cells identify and repair DNA lesions that result from chemical and radiation exposure (1). The DNA binding protein XPA is an essential part of a pre-incision complex that forms at sites of damage, and is necessary for the initiation of nucleotide excision repair (2). XPA is one of eight NER proteins (XPA-G, XPV) encoded by genes that are defective in cases of xeroderma pigmentosum, a disorder characterized by sensitivity to sunlight, predisposition to exposed tissue cancers, and neurological defects in some patients (3). Activation of XPA follows phosphorylation at Ser196 and results in increased NER activity. Phosphorylation of XPA at Ser196 is induced by UV exposure in an ATR-dependant fashion (4) and promotes nuclear accumulation of XPA (5). Research studies suggest that XPA may be a direct substrate of the serine/threonine kinase ATR (4) and that NER activity may be negatively regulated through dephosphorylation of Ser196 by the phosphatase WIP1 (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The 55 kDa centrosomal protein (CEP55) is a widely expressed centrosome and midbody-associated protein that regulates cytokinesis, including completion of the final step during cytokinesis known as abscission (1,2). CEP55 activity during abscission is negatively regulated by p53 through Polo-like kinase 1 (3,4). The breast and ovarian cancer DNA repair protein BRCA2 interacts with CEP55 and plays a regulatory role during abscission (5). Research studies demonstrate that CEP55 is also involved in the regulation of Akt signaling, autophagy, and may be a biomarker in human cancer (reviewed in 6). The correlated overexpression of CEP55, the transcription factor FoxM1, and the HELLS helicase is seen in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (7,8). Additional studies demonstrate that CEP55 expression regulates cell proliferation in gastric carcinoma (9).