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Monkey Resolution of Meiotic Joint Molecules as Recombinants

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Mismatch repair (MMR), a conserved process that involves correcting errors made during DNA synthesis, is crucial to the maintenance of genomic integrity. MLH1 is the human homologue of the E. coli MMR gene mutL. MMR requires recognition of a base mismatch or insertion/deletion loop by a MutS homolog followed by recruitment of a MutL heterodimeric complex consisting of MLH1 and PMS1 (MutL-γ), PMS2 (MutL-α) or MLH3 (MutL-γ). Other factors required for MMR in eukaryotes are EXO1, PCNA, RFC, RPA, DNA polymerases and DNA ligase (reviewed in 1). Inactivation of the MLH1 gene causes genome instability and predisposition to cancer (2-5). The MLH1 gene is frequently mutated in hereditary nonpolyposis colon cancer (HNPCC) (6). MLH1 also plays a role in meiotic recombination (7).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Mismatch repair (MMR), a conserved process that involves correcting errors made during DNA synthesis, is crucial to the maintenance of genomic integrity. MLH1 is the human homologue of the E. coli MMR gene mutL. MMR requires recognition of a base mismatch or insertion/deletion loop by a MutS homolog followed by recruitment of a MutL heterodimeric complex consisting of MLH1 and PMS1 (MutL-γ), PMS2 (MutL-α) or MLH3 (MutL-γ). Other factors required for MMR in eukaryotes are EXO1, PCNA, RFC, RPA, DNA polymerases and DNA ligase (reviewed in 1). Inactivation of the MLH1 gene causes genome instability and predisposition to cancer (2-5). The MLH1 gene is frequently mutated in hereditary nonpolyposis colon cancer (HNPCC) (6). MLH1 also plays a role in meiotic recombination (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: DNA repair systems operate in all living cells to manage a variety of DNA lesions. Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is implemented in cases where bulky helix-distorting lesions occur, such as those brought about by UV and certain chemicals (1). Excision Repair Cross Complementing 4 (ERCC4, XPF) forms a complex with the ERCC1 excision repair protein to create an essential 5’ endonuclease responsible for lesion excision (2). ERCC1-XPF is also required for repair of DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs) (3) and involved in repair of double strand breaks (4). Mutations in the corresponding XPF gene cause specific forms of xeroderma pigmentosum, Cockayne syndrome, and Fanconi anemia, while altered XPF protein levels may be associated with disease progression and response to treatment in specific human cancers (5,6).

$129
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: DNA topoisomerases I and II are nuclear enzymes; type II consists of two highly homologous isoforms: topoisomerase IIα and IIβ. These enzymes regulate the topology of DNA, maintain genomic integrity, and are essential for processes such as DNA replication, recombination, transcription, and chromosome segregation by allowing DNA strands to pass through each other (1). Topoisomerase I nicks and rejoins one strand of the duplex DNA, while topoisomerase II transiently breaks and closes double-stranded DNA (2). Topoisomerases are very susceptible to various stresses. Acidic pH or oxidative stress can convert topoisomerases to DNA-breaking nucleases, causing genomic instability and cell death. DNA-damaging topoisomerase targeting drugs (e.g., etoposide) also convert topoisomerases to nucleases, with the enzyme usually trapped as an intermediate that is covalently bound to the 5+ end of the cleaved DNA strand(s). Research studies have shown that this intermediate leads to genomic instability and cell death. Thus, agents that target topoisomerases are highly sought after cancer chemotherapeutic drugs (3). Ca2+-regulated phosphorylation of topoisomerase IIα at Ser1106 modulates the activity of this enzyme and its sensitivity to targeting drugs (4).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Topoisomerase IIα (D10G9) XP® Rabbit mAb #12286.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: DNA topoisomerases I and II are nuclear enzymes; type II consists of two highly homologous isoforms: topoisomerase IIα and IIβ. These enzymes regulate the topology of DNA, maintain genomic integrity, and are essential for processes such as DNA replication, recombination, transcription, and chromosome segregation by allowing DNA strands to pass through each other (1). Topoisomerase I nicks and rejoins one strand of the duplex DNA, while topoisomerase II transiently breaks and closes double-stranded DNA (2). Topoisomerases are very susceptible to various stresses. Acidic pH or oxidative stress can convert topoisomerases to DNA-breaking nucleases, causing genomic instability and cell death. DNA-damaging topoisomerase targeting drugs (e.g., etoposide) also convert topoisomerases to nucleases, with the enzyme usually trapped as an intermediate that is covalently bound to the 5+ end of the cleaved DNA strand(s). Research studies have shown that this intermediate leads to genomic instability and cell death. Thus, agents that target topoisomerases are highly sought after cancer chemotherapeutic drugs (3). Ca2+-regulated phosphorylation of topoisomerase IIα at Ser1106 modulates the activity of this enzyme and its sensitivity to targeting drugs (4).