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Monkey Steroid Hormone Receptor Complex Assembly

Also showing Polyclonal Antibody Steroid Hormone Receptor Complex Assembly

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: FKBP4 (also known as FKBP52) is a member of the immunophilin protein family. FKBP4 does not demonstrate appreciable immunosuppressant activity typical of this family, despite its ability to bind the immunosuppressants FK506 and rapamycin (1,2). While FKBP4 plays an important role in immunoregulatory gene expression in B and T lymphocytes, its role in regulating steroid hormone receptor signaling and cytoskeletal dynamics is garnering significant interest. FKBP4 contains two petidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase (PPIase) domains, the first of which is implicated in steroid receptor signaling while the second interacts with tubulin and other cytoskeletal components. The maturation of cytoplasmic steroid hormone receptors into a functional conformation requires multiple chaperone and co-chaperone components, including HSP90, p23, and FKBP4 (3,4). FKBP4 interacts with HSP90 to facilitate the folding of androgen, glucocorticoid, and progesterone steroid hormone receptors. Indeed, the functionality of these receptors is impaired in the absence of FKBP4, and research studies have found that null mice demonstrate signs of androgen insensitivity syndrome (5). In addition, FKBP4, which is expressed at high levels in the brain, interacts with hyperphosphorylated Tau and antagonizes Tau's ability to promote microtubule polymerization (6). FKBP4 can also suppress amyloid β toxicity in Drosophila by processing APP (Alzheimer's Amyloid Precursor Protein) to unfold aggregates (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Calcium is a universal signaling molecule involved in many cellular functions such as cell motility, metabolism, protein modification, protein folding, and apoptosis. Calcium is stored in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), where it is buffered by calcium binding chaperones such as calnexin and calreticulin, and is released via the IP3 Receptor channel (1). Calreticulin also functions as an ER chaperone that ensures proper folding and quality control of newly synthesized glycoproteins. As such, calreticulin presumably does not alter protein folding but regulates proper timing for efficient folding and subunit assembly. Furthermore, calreticulin retains proteins in non-native conformation within the ER and targets them for degradation (2,3).