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Monoclonal Antibody Chromatin Ip Neurogenesis

Also showing Monoclonal Antibody Chromatin Ip Negative Regulation of Neurogenesis, Monoclonal Antibody Chromatin Ip Regulation of Neurogenesis

$129
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: YAP (Yes-associated protein, YAP65) was identified based on its ability to associate with the SH3 domain of Yes. It also binds to other SH3 domain-containing proteins such as Nck, Crk, Src, and Abl (1). In addition to the SH3 binding motif, YAP contains a PDZ interaction motif, a coiled-coil domain, and WW domains (2-4). While initial studies of YAP all pointed towards a role in anchoring and targeting to specific subcellular compartments, subsequent studies showed that YAP is a transcriptional co-activator by virtue of its WW domain interacting with the PY motif (PPxY) of the transcription factor PEBP2 and other transcription factors (5). In its capacity as a transcriptional co-activator, YAP is now widely recognized as a central mediator of the Hippo Pathway, which plays a fundamental and widely conserved role in regulating tissue growth and organ size. Phosphorylation at multiple sites (e.g., Ser109, Ser127) by LATS kinases promotes YAP translocation from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, where it is sequestered through association with 14-3-3 proteins (6-8). These LATS-driven phosphorylation events serve to prime YAP for subsequent phosphorylation by CK1δ/ε in an adjacent phosphodegron, triggering proteosomal degradation of YAP (9).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Bcl-11B (Ctip2) is a COUP-TF interacting protein that belongs to the C2H2 type zinc finger protein family (1). Bcl-11B is highly expressed in the brain and is critical for the development of neurons, as well as other tissues and organs. Bcl-11B also plays an essential role in T cell lineage commitment and maintenance of T cell identity (1-3). Two isoforms of Bcl-11B are found to be encoded by the BCL11B gene, possibly through exon-skipping (4). Bcl-11B is a transcription factor which binds to target genes through the 2nd and 3rd zinc-finger domains of exon 4 (3), while also interacting with various protein partners including COUP-TF proteins (1), the NuRD complex (5,6), HDAC1, HDAC2, and SUV39H1 (7). Research studies have shown that mutations and deletion of Bcl-11B contribute to the development of thymic lymphoma in mice and T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia in humans, indicating a role as a tumor suppressor (4,8). Mechanistic studies have shown that Bcl-11B represses gene expression of the E3 ubiquitin ligase HDM2 in a p53-dependent manner (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Circadian rhythms govern many key physiological processes that fluctuate with a period of approximately 24 hours. These processes include the sleep-wake cycle, glucose, lipid and drug metabolism, heart rate, hormone secretion, renal blood flow, and body temperature, as well as basic cellular processes such as DNA repair and the timing of the cell division cycle (1,2). The mammalian circadian system consists of many individual tissue-specific clocks (peripheral clocks) that are controlled by a master circadian pacemaker residing in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) of the brain (1,2). The periodic circadian rhythm is prominently manifested by the light-dark cycle, which is sensed by the visual system and processed by the SCN. The SCN processes the light-dark information and synchronizes peripheral clocks through neural and humoral output signals (1,2).The cellular circadian clockwork consists of interwoven positive and negative regulatory loops, or limbs (1,2). The positive limb includes the CLOCK and BMAL1 proteins, two basic helix-loop-helix-PAS containing transcription factors that bind E box enhancer elements and activate transcription of their target genes. CLOCK is a histone acetyltransferase (HAT) protein, which acetylates both histone H3 and H4 (3). BMAL1 binds to CLOCK and enhances its HAT activity (3). The CLOCK/BMAL1 dimer exhibits a periodic oscillation in both nuclear/cytoplasmic localization and protein levels, both of which are regulated by phosphorylation (4,5). CLOCK/BMAL1 target genes include the Cry and Per genes, whose proteins form the negative limb of the circadian clockwork system (1,2). CRY and PER proteins (CRY1, CRY2, PER1, PER2 and PER3) form oligomers that also periodically shuttle between the nucleus and cytoplasm. When in the nucleus, CRY/PER proteins inhibit CLOCK/BMAL1-mediated transcriptional activation, thus completing the circadian transcriptional loop (1,2). In tissues, roughly six to eight percent of all genes exhibit a circadian expression pattern (1,2). This 24-hour periodicity in gene expression results from coordination of the positive and negative regulatory limbs of the cellular clockwork system, and is fine-tuned by outside signals received from the SCN.

$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Notch proteins (Notch1-4) are a family of transmembrane receptors that play important roles in development and the determination of cell fate (1). Mature Notch receptors are processed and assembled as heterodimeric proteins, with each dimer comprised of a large extracellular ligand-binding domain, a single-pass transmembrane domain, and a smaller cytoplasmic subunit (Notch intracellular domain, NICD) (2). Binding of Notch receptors to ligands of the Delta-Serrate-Lag2 (DSL) family triggers heterodimer dissociation, exposing the receptors to proteolytic cleavages; these result in release of the NICD, which translocates to the nucleus and activates transcription of downstream target genes (3,4).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Notch proteins (Notch1-4) are a family of transmembrane receptors that play important roles in development and the determination of cell fate (1). Mature Notch receptors are processed and assembled as heterodimeric proteins, with each dimer comprised of a large extracellular ligand-binding domain, a single-pass transmembrane domain, and a smaller cytoplasmic subunit (Notch intracellular domain, NICD) (2). Binding of Notch receptors to ligands of the Delta-Serrate-Lag2 (DSL) family triggers heterodimer dissociation, exposing the receptors to proteolytic cleavages; these result in release of the NICD, which translocates to the nucleus and activates transcription of downstream target genes (3,4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: NeuroD is a member of the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) family of transcription factors. These proteins function by forming heterodimers with E-proteins and binding to the canonical E-box sequence CANNTG (1,2). Neuronal activity results in CaMKII-mediated phosphorylation of NeuroD at Ser336, which is necessary for formation and growth of dendrites (3,4). NeuroD is also phosphorylated at Ser274 though the results are context dependent as phosphorylation by Erk stimulates NeuroD activity in pancreatic β-cells while phosphorylation by GSK-3β inhibits NeuroD in neurons (3). NeuroD is crucially important in both the pancreas and developing nervous system, and plays a large role in the development of the inner ear and mammalian retina (3). Mice lacking NeuroD become severely diabetic and die shortly after birth due to defects in β-cell differentiation (2,3,5,6). The lack of NeuroD in the brain results in severe defects in development (5). Human mutations have been linked to a number of types of diabetes including type I diabetes mellitus and maturity-onset diabetes of the young (1,3).