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Monoclonal Antibody Endonuclease Activity

Also showing Monoclonal Antibody Western Blotting Endonuclease Activity

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Ape1 (Apurinic/Apyrimidic eEndonuclease 1), also known as Ref1 (Redox effector factor 1), is a multifunctional protein with several biological activities. These include roles in DNA repair and in the cellular response to oxidative stress. Ape1 initiates the repair of abasic sites and is essential for the base excision repair (BER) pathway (1). Repair activities of Ape1 are stimulated by interaction with XRCC1 (2), another essential protein in BER. Ape1 functions as a redox factor that maintains transcription factors in an active, reduced state but can also function in a redox-independent manner as a transcriptional cofactor to control different cellular fates such as apoptosis, proliferation and differentiation (3). Increased expression of Ape1 is associated with many types of cancers including cervical, ovarian, prostate, rhabdomyosarcomas and germ cell tumors (4). Ape1 has been shown to stimulate DNA binding of several transcription factors known to be involved in tumor progression such as Fos, Jun, NF-κB, PAX, HIF-1, HLF and p53 (4). Mutation of the Ape1 gene has also been associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The sequences encoding antigen receptors are split into multiple germline segments which are then combined by a process called V(D)J recombination during immune cells development. A variable (V) segment is combined with a joining (J) segment, and in some cases a D (Diversity) segment, to create the antigen-binding portion of the receptor. The recombined V(D)J segment is then spliced into exons that encode the constant region to produce mature mRNA (1,2). This essential process required for the development of functional immune T and B cells creates a vast diversity in these receptors (3,4). Initiation of this process follows binding of RAG1 (recombination activating gene 1) and RAG2 to the conserved recombination signal sequences (RSS) and the introduction of a double-strand break between the RSS and the coding sequence (5,6). RAG1 and RAG2 genes are located immediately adjacent to each other in the genome and lack introns in their coding regions in many species. RAG1 and RAG2 are coexpressed only in the B and T cell lineages and both are required for cleavage activity (7). RAG1 and RAG2 can also function as transposases, contributing to chromosomal translocations and lymphoid malignancy (8,9). Mutations in the RAG genes are associated with a spectrum of combined immune deficiencies in humans (10,11).