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Monoclonal Antibody Flow Cytometry Lipoprotein Metabolic Process

Also showing Monoclonal Antibody Flow Cytometry Glycosaminoglycan Biosynthetic Process, Monoclonal Antibody Flow Cytometry Chondroitin Sulfate Metabolic Process

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Syndecans are a family of type 1 transmembrane heparan sulphate proteoglycans comprising 4 members in mammals (SDC-1 to -4) (1) encoded by four syndecan genes. Syndecans are involved in embryonic development, tumorigenesis, and angiogenesis (2). The extracellular domain harbors attachment sites for heparan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate chains, facilitating interaction with an array of proteins including a plethora of growth factors. In addition, the hydrophobic C-terminal intracellular domain can interact with proteins containing a PDZ domain (2). These interactions place syndecans as important integrators of membrane signaling (3). Syndecans undergo proteolytic cleavage causing the release of their extracellular domain (shedding), converting the membrane-bound proteins into soluble molecular effectors (4).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Syndecan 1 (D4Y7H) Rabbit mAb #12922.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Syndecans are a family of type 1 transmembrane heparan sulphate proteoglycans comprising 4 members in mammals (SDC-1 to -4) (1) encoded by four syndecan genes. Syndecans are involved in embryonic development, tumorigenesis, and angiogenesis (2). The extracellular domain harbors attachment sites for heparan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate chains, facilitating interaction with an array of proteins including a plethora of growth factors. In addition, the hydrophobic C-terminal intracellular domain can interact with proteins containing a PDZ domain (2). These interactions place syndecans as important integrators of membrane signaling (3). Syndecans undergo proteolytic cleavage causing the release of their extracellular domain (shedding), converting the membrane-bound proteins into soluble molecular effectors (4).