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Monoclonal Antibody Flow Cytometry Rna Binding

$270
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Western Blotting

Background: Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A2/B1 (hnRNP A2/B1) is a member of the hnRNP A/B family of related RNA binding proteins that bind pre-mRNA and are involved in the processing, metabolism and transport of nuclear pre-mRNA transcripts (1). Alternative splicing produces transcripts that encode two homologous hnRNP proteins, hnRNPA2 and hnRNPB1, from a single gene sequence (2). Studies demonstrate hnRNP A2/B1 splicing repression across multiple targets (3,4) and that both proteins can bind and protect telomere repeat sequences from DNase digestion (5,6). Altered expression of hnRNP B1 is seen in several forms of cancer, including squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, and various forms of lung cancer (7). Over expression of hnRNP B1 may be associated with inhibition of DNA-PK activity and impaired DNA repair during early stages of cancer development (8). Autoantigens to hnRNP A2/B1 (termed RA33) are associated with rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythromatosus and mixed connective tissue disease (9-11).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated PU.1 (9G7) Rabbit mAb #2258.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: PU.1 is a member of the Ets family of transcription factors and activates target genes through the purine-rich PU-box (1). PU.1 plays a pivotal role in the differentiation of myeloid cells and lymphocytes and is expressed in several hematopoietic cells including B lymphocytes, macrophages, neutrophils, mast cells, early erythroid cells, and megakaryocytes (1,2). The concentration of PU.1 is critical for both the determination of hematopoietic cell lineage and the regulation of differentiation versus stem cell proliferation (3,4). In addition, PU.1 activity is influenced by phosphorylation and interactions with other hematopoietic transcription factors. Phosphorylation of PU.1 at Ser146 by CK2 promotes binding to IRF4 and synergistic activation through the immunoglobulin κ 3' enhancer (5). Treatment of pro-B cells with IL-3 leads to phosphorylation of PU.1 at Ser140, resulting in increased PU.1 activity and activation of the anti-apoptotic gene MCL-1 (6). GATA1 binding blocks PU.1 activity during erythroid cell development (7). Overexpression of PU.1 resulting from proviral insertion during Friend virus infection can induce erythroleukemia, while reduced expression has been associated with acute myeloid leukemia (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 (hnRNP A1) is a member of the hnRNP A/B family of related RNA binding proteins that bind pre-mRNA and are involved in the processing, metabolism, and transport of nuclear pre-mRNA transcripts (1). hnRNP A1 regulates the alternative splicing of c-Src and c-H-Ras (2,3) and modifies initiation of translation of the fibroblast growth factor 2 mRNA (4). hnRNP A1 expression level is elevated in many cancers; knockdown of hnRNP A1 leads to apoptosis in various cancer cells (5). Although predominantly nuclear, hnRNP A1 is continually transported from the nucleus to the cytoplasm where it disassociates from mRNA and is rapidly re-imported into the nucleus (6,7). hnRNP A1 binds to cis-acting repressive sequences (CRS) of HIV-1 to influence HIV-1 production (8,9). HIV-1 enhances hnRNP A1 expression and promotes the relocalization of hnRNP A1 to the cytoplasm (10).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: PR domain zinc finger protein 14 (PRDM14) is a likely protein lysine methyltransferase that is primarily expressed in primordial germ cells and pluripotent embryonic stem cells. It is essential for the establishment and maintenance of primordial germ cells and critical for the maintenance of pluripotency in embryonic stem cells (1-3). PRDM14 represses genes involved in the differentiation of stem cells into various cell lineages, likely via a combination of interactions with TET proteins, the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2), and CBFA2T2 (3-8). In addition, overexpression of PRDM14 in combination with Jarid2 promotes induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) formation (9). PRDM14 protein levels are overexpressed in certain cancers, including breast, leukemia (T-ALL), and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) (10-13), and PRDM14 overexpression may serve as a novel prognostic marker in NSCLC (14). Targeting PRDM14 overexpression with a siRNA-based therapy was shown to decrease liver metastasis in a murine pancreatic cancer model, suggesting potential as a therapeutic option for cancers where this protein is abnormally expressed (15).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 488 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis of human cells. The unconjugated antibody #2258 reacts with human and mouse PU.1 protein. CST expects that PU.1 (9G7) Rabbit mAb (Alexa Fluor® 488 Conjugate) will also recognize PU.1 in these species.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: PU.1 is a member of the Ets family of transcription factors and activates target genes through the purine-rich PU-box (1). PU.1 plays a pivotal role in the differentiation of myeloid cells and lymphocytes and is expressed in several hematopoietic cells including B lymphocytes, macrophages, neutrophils, mast cells, early erythroid cells, and megakaryocytes (1,2). The concentration of PU.1 is critical for both the determination of hematopoietic cell lineage and the regulation of differentiation versus stem cell proliferation (3,4). In addition, PU.1 activity is influenced by phosphorylation and interactions with other hematopoietic transcription factors. Phosphorylation of PU.1 at Ser146 by CK2 promotes binding to IRF4 and synergistic activation through the immunoglobulin κ 3' enhancer (5). Treatment of pro-B cells with IL-3 leads to phosphorylation of PU.1 at Ser140, resulting in increased PU.1 activity and activation of the anti-apoptotic gene MCL-1 (6). GATA1 binding blocks PU.1 activity during erythroid cell development (7). Overexpression of PU.1 resulting from proviral insertion during Friend virus infection can induce erythroleukemia, while reduced expression has been associated with acute myeloid leukemia (8).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 647 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis of human cells. The unconjugated antibody #2258 reacts with human and mouse PU.1 protein. CST expects that PU.1 (9G7) Rabbit mAb (Alexa Fluor® 647 Conjugate) will also recognize PU.1 in these species.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: PU.1 is a member of the Ets family of transcription factors and activates target genes through the purine-rich PU-box (1). PU.1 plays a pivotal role in the differentiation of myeloid cells and lymphocytes and is expressed in several hematopoietic cells including B lymphocytes, macrophages, neutrophils, mast cells, early erythroid cells, and megakaryocytes (1,2). The concentration of PU.1 is critical for both the determination of hematopoietic cell lineage and the regulation of differentiation versus stem cell proliferation (3,4). In addition, PU.1 activity is influenced by phosphorylation and interactions with other hematopoietic transcription factors. Phosphorylation of PU.1 at Ser146 by CK2 promotes binding to IRF4 and synergistic activation through the immunoglobulin κ 3' enhancer (5). Treatment of pro-B cells with IL-3 leads to phosphorylation of PU.1 at Ser140, resulting in increased PU.1 activity and activation of the anti-apoptotic gene MCL-1 (6). GATA1 binding blocks PU.1 activity during erythroid cell development (7). Overexpression of PU.1 resulting from proviral insertion during Friend virus infection can induce erythroleukemia, while reduced expression has been associated with acute myeloid leukemia (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: PU.1 is a member of the Ets family of transcription factors and activates target genes through the purine-rich PU-box (1). PU.1 plays a pivotal role in the differentiation of myeloid cells and lymphocytes and is expressed in several hematopoietic cells including B lymphocytes, macrophages, neutrophils, mast cells, early erythroid cells, and megakaryocytes (1,2). The concentration of PU.1 is critical for both the determination of hematopoietic cell lineage and the regulation of differentiation versus stem cell proliferation (3,4). In addition, PU.1 activity is influenced by phosphorylation and interactions with other hematopoietic transcription factors. Phosphorylation of PU.1 at Ser146 by CK2 promotes binding to IRF4 and synergistic activation through the immunoglobulin κ 3' enhancer (5). Treatment of pro-B cells with IL-3 leads to phosphorylation of PU.1 at Ser140, resulting in increased PU.1 activity and activation of the anti-apoptotic gene MCL-1 (6). GATA1 binding blocks PU.1 activity during erythroid cell development (7). Overexpression of PU.1 resulting from proviral insertion during Friend virus infection can induce erythroleukemia, while reduced expression has been associated with acute myeloid leukemia (8).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 488 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated α-Tubulin (DM1A) Mouse mAb #3873.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: microtubules, microfilaments (actin filaments), and intermediate filaments. Globular tubulin subunits comprise the microtubule building block, with α/β-tubulin heterodimers forming the tubulin subunit common to all eukaryotic cells. γ-tubulin is required to nucleate polymerization of tubulin subunits to form microtubule polymers. Many cell movements are mediated by microtubule action, including the beating of cilia and flagella, cytoplasmic transport of membrane vesicles, chromosome alignment during meiosis/mitosis, and nerve-cell axon migration. These movements result from competitive microtubule polymerization and depolymerization or through the actions of microtubule motor proteins (1).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: YY1 (Yin Yang1) is a ubiquitously expressed transcription factor with fundamental roles in embryogenesis, differentiation, replication and proliferation. YY1 contains four zinc finger motifs of the Cys-Cys-His-His type and can activate different eukaryotic genes (such as CREB, c-myc, Histone H4, p53 and PARP-1) or repress different eukaryotic genes (such as α-actin, IFN-β and IFN-γ) as well as regulate some viral promoters (1). YY1 deficient embryos die approximately at the time of implantation, suggesting that YY1 has an essential role in embryonic development (2). YY1 is overexpressed in cancer cells such as prostate cancer and therefore may be considered a prognostic marker (1).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, D. melanogaster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Pig, Rat, Zebrafish

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: microtubules, microfilaments (actin filaments), and intermediate filaments. Globular tubulin subunits comprise the microtubule building block, with α/β-tubulin heterodimers forming the tubulin subunit common to all eukaryotic cells. γ-tubulin is required to nucleate polymerization of tubulin subunits to form microtubule polymers. Many cell movements are mediated by microtubule action, including the beating of cilia and flagella, cytoplasmic transport of membrane vesicles, chromosome alignment during meiosis/mitosis, and nerve-cell axon migration. These movements result from competitive microtubule polymerization and depolymerization or through the actions of microtubule motor proteins (1).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 647 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry and immunofluorescent analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated α-Tubulin (11H10) Rabbit mAb #2125.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, D. melanogaster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Pig, Rat, Zebrafish

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: microtubules, microfilaments (actin filaments), and intermediate filaments. Globular tubulin subunits comprise the microtubule building block, with α/β-tubulin heterodimers forming the tubulin subunit common to all eukaryotic cells. γ-tubulin is required to nucleate polymerization of tubulin subunits to form microtubule polymers. Many cell movements are mediated by microtubule action, including the beating of cilia and flagella, cytoplasmic transport of membrane vesicles, chromosome alignment during meiosis/mitosis, and nerve-cell axon migration. These movements result from competitive microtubule polymerization and depolymerization or through the actions of microtubule motor proteins (1).

$134
20 µl
$336
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat, Zebrafish

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: microtubules, microfilaments (actin filaments), and intermediate filaments. Globular tubulin subunits comprise the microtubule building block, with α/β-tubulin heterodimers forming the tubulin subunit common to all eukaryotic cells. γ-tubulin is required to nucleate polymerization of tubulin subunits to form microtubule polymers. Many cell movements are mediated by microtubule action, including the beating of cilia and flagella, cytoplasmic transport of membrane vesicles, chromosome alignment during meiosis/mitosis, and nerve-cell axon migration. These movements result from competitive microtubule polymerization and depolymerization or through the actions of microtubule motor proteins (1).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: TIAR is a member of the RNA-recognition motif (RRM) family of RNA-binding proteins (1,2). It functions as a translational repressor under conditions of cellular damage (3,4). In response to cellular stress, TIAR associates with eIF1, eIF3, and the 40S ribosomal subunit and forms noncanonical preinitiation complexes that are translationally inactive (3,4). TIAR then aggregates with its family member TIA1 and facilitates the accumulation of the translationally inactive preinitiation complexes into discrete cytoplasmic foci called stress granules. The two major isoforms of TIAR are the products of alternative mRNA splicing (5,6).

$364
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Acetyl-α-Tubulin (Lys40) (D20G3) XP® Rabbit mAb #5335.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat, Zebrafish

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: microtubules, microfilaments (actin filaments), and intermediate filaments. Globular tubulin subunits comprise the microtubule building block, with α/β-tubulin heterodimers forming the tubulin subunit common to all eukaryotic cells. γ-tubulin is required to nucleate polymerization of tubulin subunits to form microtubule polymers. Many cell movements are mediated by microtubule action, including the beating of cilia and flagella, cytoplasmic transport of membrane vesicles, chromosome alignment during meiosis/mitosis, and nerve-cell axon migration. These movements result from competitive microtubule polymerization and depolymerization or through the actions of microtubule motor proteins (1).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Apoptosis repressor with caspase recruitment domain (ARC), also independently identified as muscle-enriched cytoplasmic protein (MYP), is a CARD domain protein that regulates apoptosis (1). The ARC protein CARD domain is highly homologous to those in other cell death regulators, including caspase-2, caspase-9, RAIDD, and Apaf-1 (2). The NOL3 gene encodes both the cytoplasmic ARC protein and a 30 kDa nucleolar protein (Nop30) that is involved in RNA splicing. ARC is encoded from isoform 2 of NOL3, while isoform 1 produced by alternative splicing encodes Nop30. Both ARC and Nop30 proteins share common amino-terminal sequences (3). Research studies show that ARC can bind to caspase-8 and caspase-2 and inhibit apoptosis through extrinsic pathways that involve the receptor proteins Fas, TNFR1, and DR3 (1). Additional research indicates that the ARC anti-apoptotic mechanism may include both intrinsic (mitochondrial) and extrinsic (death receptor) pathways (4). In addition to binding caspases, ARC can disrupt the interaction with the death domains of Fas and FADD, which inhibits death-inducing signaling complex (DISC) assembly. The CARD domain of ARC can inhibit intrinsic apoptosis through binding to the pro-apoptotic Bax protein (5). Phosphorylation of ARC at Thr149 by CK2 is required for targeting of ARC to the mitochondria (6). ARC is able to suppress necroptosis, a programmed pathway of necrosis triggered by blocking the recruitment of RIP1 to TNFR1 (7). Expression of ARC protein is predominantly seen in terminally differentiated cells under normal conditions and is markedly induced in a variety of cancers including pancreatic, colorectal, breast, lung, glioblastoma, liver, kidney, melanoma, and acute myeloid leukemia (1, 8-12).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: YY1 (Yin Yang1) is a ubiquitously expressed transcription factor with fundamental roles in embryogenesis, differentiation, replication and proliferation. YY1 contains four zinc finger motifs of the Cys-Cys-His-His type and can activate different eukaryotic genes (such as CREB, c-myc, Histone H4, p53 and PARP-1) or repress different eukaryotic genes (such as α-actin, IFN-β and IFN-γ) as well as regulate some viral promoters (1). YY1 deficient embryos die approximately at the time of implantation, suggesting that YY1 has an essential role in embryonic development (2). YY1 is overexpressed in cancer cells such as prostate cancer and therefore may be considered a prognostic marker (1).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated SUZ12 (D39F6) XP® Rabbit mAb #3737.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: The polycomb group (PcG) proteins contribute to the maintenance of cell identity, stem cell self-renewal, cell cycle regulation and oncogenesis by maintaining the silenced state of genes that promote cell lineage specification, cell death and cell-cycle arrest (1-4). PcG proteins exist in two complexes that cooperate to maintain long-term gene silencing through epigenetic chromatin modifications. The first complex, EED-EZH2, is recruited to genes by DNA-binding transcription factors and methylates histone H3 on Lys27. Methylation of Lys27 facilitates the recruitment of the second complex, PRC1, which ubiquitinylates histone H2A on Lys119 (5). Suppressor of Zeste 12 (SUZ12) is a component of the PRC2 complex, which together with Ezh2 and Eed is absolutely required for histone methyl-transferase activity (6). SUZ12 contains a C2H2 zinc finger domain similar to the zinc finger domains found in sequence-specific DNA binding proteins and may mediate the interaction between EZH2 and nucleosomes (6). SUZ12 is overexpressed in several human tumors, including tumors of the colon, breast and liver (7,8).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated 4F2hc/CD98 (D3F9D) XP® Rabbit mAb #47213.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: 4F2hc is a transmembrane protein that belongs to the solute carrier family. 4F2hc forms heterodimeric complexes with various amino acid transporters such as LAT1 and LAT2 and regulates uptake of amino acids (1-5). 4F2hc is one of the earliest expressed antigens on the surface of activated human lymphocytes (6), hence it is also named CD98. 4F2hc is expressed in all cell types with the exception of platelets, and is expressed at highest levels in the tubules of the kidney and the gastrointestinal tract (7,8). It is localized at the plasma membrane when associated with LAT1 or LAT2 (9) and at the apical membrane of placenta (10). Research studies have shown that 4F2hc is highly expressed in various tumors including glioma (11), ovarian cancer (12), and astrocytomas (13), and it has been implicated in tumor progression and correlated with poor outcome in patients with pulmonary neuroendocrine tumors (14). 4F2hc is also involved in integrin trafficking through association with β1 and β4 integrins, and regulates keratinocyte adhesion and differentiation (15).

$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: LIN28A and LIN28B are conserved, developmentally regulated RNA binding proteins that inhibit the processing and maturation of the let-7 family of miRNAs (1,2). The let-7 miRNAs have been implicated in repression of oncogenes such as Ras, Myc, and HMGA2 (3). It has recently been shown that upregulation of LIN28A and LIN28B in primary human tumors and human cancer cell lines is correlated with downregulation of let-7 miRNAs (4). LIN28 genes are reported to be involved in primordial germ cell development and germ cell malignancy (5). In addition, allelic variation in LIN28B is associated with regulating the timing of puberty in humans (6). Overexpression of LIN28A, in conjunction with Oct-4, Sox2, and Nanog, can reprogram human fibroblasts to pluripotent, ES-like cells (7).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Vimentin (D21H3) XP® Rabbit mAb #5741.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: microfilaments (actin filaments), intermediate filaments, and microtubules. Major types of intermediate filaments are distinguished by their cell-specific expression: cytokeratins (epithelial cells), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) (glial cells), desmin (skeletal, visceral, and certain vascular smooth muscle cells), vimentin (mesenchyme origin), and neurofilaments (neurons). GFAP and vimentin form intermediate filaments in astroglial cells and modulate their motility and shape (1). In particular, vimentin filaments are present at early developmental stages, while GFAP filaments are characteristic of differentiated and mature brain astrocytes. Thus, GFAP is commonly used as a marker for intracranial and intraspinal tumors arising from astrocytes (2). Research studies have shown that vimentin is present in sarcomas, but not carcinomas, and its expression is examined in conjunction with that of other markers to distinguish between the two (3). Vimentin's dynamic structural changes and spatial re-organization in response to extracellular stimuli help to coordinate various signaling pathways (4). Phosphorylation of vimentin at Ser56 in smooth muscle cells regulates the structural arrangement of vimentin filaments in response to serotonin (5,6). Remodeling of vimentin and other intermediate filaments is important during lymphocyte adhesion and migration through the endothelium (7).During mitosis, CDK1 phosphorylates vimentin at Ser56. This phosphorylation provides a PLK binding site for vimentin-PLK interaction. PLK further phosphorylates vimentin at Ser82, which might serve as memory phosphorylation site and play a regulatory role in vimentin filament disassembly (8,9). Additionally, studies using various soft-tissue sarcoma cells have shown that phosphorylation of vimentin at Ser39 by Akt1 enhances cell migration and survival, suggesting that vimentin could be a potential target for soft-tissue sarcoma targeted therapy (10,11).