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Monoclonal Antibody Immunofluorescence Frozen Regulation of Neuron Apoptosis

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: α-Synuclein is a protein of 140-amino acids expressed abundantly in the brain. α-Synuclein is also the main component of pathogenic Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites. Research studies have shown that mutations of the α-synuclein gene are linked to Parkinson's disease (1).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are serine/threonine kinases that are activated by cyclins and govern eukaryotic cell cycle progression. While CDK5 shares high sequence homology with its family members, it is thought mainly to function in postmitotic neurons, regulating the cytoarchitecture of these cells. Analogous to cyclins, p35 and p39 associate with and activate CDK5 despite the lack of sequence homology. CDK5 is ubiquitously expressed, but high levels of kinase activity are detected primarily in the nervous system due to the narrow expression pattern of p35 and p39 in post-mitotic neurons. A large number of CDK5 substrates have been identified although no discrete substrates have been attributed as a function of p35 vs. p39. Amongst many, substrates of CDK5 include p35 and p39. p35 is rapidly degraded (T1/2 <20 min) by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (1). However, p35 stability increases as CDK5 kinase activity decreases, and this is likely a result of decreased phosphorylation of p35 at Thr138 by CDK5 (2). NGF activates Erk and EGR1, and induces p35 expression in PC12 cells (3). Proteolytic cleavage of p35 by calpain produces p25 upon neurotoxic insult, resulting in prolonged activation of CDK5 by p25. Accumulation of p25 is found in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) (4-5).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin)

Background: Nestin is an intermediate filament family member protein that is structurally related to the neurofilament proteins (1). It is highly expressed in the developing brain, where it may help to regulate cell structure and intracellular processes required for neural cell division and migration (1,2). Upon maturation of the brain, nestin expression is quickly down-regulated and replaced by expression of the neurofilament proteins (2). Because nestin is expressed in both mature and precursor neuronal and glial cells, as well as in the developing brain and in the brain and spinal cord following damage, nestin is widely accepted as a marker of neural stem/progenitor cells (3). Research studies have shown that expression of nestin is also found in cells from various nervous system tumors, including gliomas, neuroblastomas, astrocytomas, and it is generally accepted as a marker for neural cancer stem cells (3). However, nestin expression has also been observed in astrocytes, retina, cardiac muscle, pancreas, and other tissues (3). Therefore, the acceptance of nestin as an exclusive marker of neural stem/progenitor cells is not unanimous.

$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Huntington's Disease (HD) is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder characterized by psychiatric, cognitive, and motor dysfunction. Neuropathology of HD involves specific neuronal subpopulations: GABA-ergic neurons of the striatum and neurons within the cerebral cortex selectively degenerate (1,2). The genetic analysis of HD has been the flagship study of inherited neurological diseases from initial chromosomal localization to identification of the gene.Huntingtin is a large (340-350 kD) cytosolic protein that may be involved in a number of cellular functions such as transcription, gastrulation, neurogenesis, neurotransmission, axonal transport, neural positioning, and apoptosis (2,3). The HD gene from unaffected individuals contains between 6 and 34 CAG trinucleotide repeats, with expansion beyond this range causing the onset of disease symptoms. A strong inverse correlation exists between the age of onset in patients and the number of huntingtin gene CAG repeats encoding a stretch of polyglutamine peptides (1,2). The huntingtin protein undergoes numerous post-translational modifications including phosphorylation, ubiquitination, sumoylation, palmitoylation, and cleavage (2). Phosphorylation of Ser421 by Akt can partially counteract the toxicity that results from the expanded polyglutamine tract. Varying Akt expression in the brain correlates with regional differences in huntingtin protein phosphorylation; this pattern inversely correlates with the regions that are most affected by degeneration in diseased brain (2). A key step in the disease is the proteolytic cleavage of huntingtin protein into amino-terminal fragments that contain expanded glutamine repeats and translocate into the nucleus. Caspase mediated cleavage of huntingtin at Asp513 is associated with increased polyglutamine aggregate formation and toxicity. Phosphorylation of Ser434 by CDK5 protects against cleavage (2,3).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: actin microfilaments, intermediate filaments, and microtubules. Neurofilaments are the major intermediate filaments found in neurons and consist of light (NFL), medium (NFM), and heavy (NFH) subunits (1). Similar in structure to other intermediate filament proteins, neurofilaments have a globular amino-terminal head, a central α-helical rod domain, and a carboxy-terminal tail. A heterotetrameric unit (NFL-NFM and NFL-NFH) forms a protofilament, with eight protofilaments comprising the typical 10 nm intermediate filament (2). While neurofilaments are critical for radial axon growth and determine axon caliber, microtubules are involved in axon elongation. PKA phosphorylates the head domain of NFL and NFM to inhibit neurofilament assembly (3,4). Research studies have shown neurofilament accumulations in many human neurological disorders including Parkinson's disease (in Lewy bodies along with α-synuclein), Alzheimer's disease, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) (1).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: α-Synuclein is a protein of 140-amino acids expressed abundantly in the brain. α-Synuclein is also the main component of pathogenic Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites. Research studies have shown that mutations of the α-synuclein gene are linked to Parkinson's disease (1).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: actin microfilaments, intermediate filaments, and microtubules. Neurofilaments are the major intermediate filaments found in neurons and consist of light (NFL), medium (NFM), and heavy (NFH) subunits (1). Similar in structure to other intermediate filament proteins, neurofilaments have a globular amino-terminal head, a central α-helical rod domain, and a carboxy-terminal tail. A heterotetrameric unit (NFL-NFM and NFL-NFH) forms a protofilament, with eight protofilaments comprising the typical 10 nm intermediate filament (2). While neurofilaments are critical for radial axon growth and determine axon caliber, microtubules are involved in axon elongation. PKA phosphorylates the head domain of NFL and NFM to inhibit neurofilament assembly (3,4). Research studies have shown neurofilament accumulations in many human neurological disorders including Parkinson's disease (in Lewy bodies along with α-synuclein), Alzheimer's disease, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) (1).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 488 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for immunofluorescent analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Neurofilament-L (C28E10) Rabbit mAb #2837.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen)

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: actin microfilaments, intermediate filaments, and microtubules. Neurofilaments are the major intermediate filaments found in neurons and consist of light (NFL), medium (NFM), and heavy (NFH) subunits (1). Similar in structure to other intermediate filament proteins, neurofilaments have a globular amino-terminal head, a central α-helical rod domain, and a carboxy-terminal tail. A heterotetrameric unit (NFL-NFM and NFL-NFH) forms a protofilament, with eight protofilaments comprising the typical 10 nm intermediate filament (2). While neurofilaments are critical for radial axon growth and determine axon caliber, microtubules are involved in axon elongation. PKA phosphorylates the head domain of NFL and NFM to inhibit neurofilament assembly (3,4). Research studies have shown neurofilament accumulations in many human neurological disorders including Parkinson's disease (in Lewy bodies along with α-synuclein), Alzheimer's disease, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) (1).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 594 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct immunofluorescent analysis in rat brain. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Neurofilament-L (C28E10) Rabbit mAb #2837.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen)

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: actin microfilaments, intermediate filaments, and microtubules. Neurofilaments are the major intermediate filaments found in neurons and consist of light (NFL), medium (NFM), and heavy (NFH) subunits (1). Similar in structure to other intermediate filament proteins, neurofilaments have a globular amino-terminal head, a central α-helical rod domain, and a carboxy-terminal tail. A heterotetrameric unit (NFL-NFM and NFL-NFH) forms a protofilament, with eight protofilaments comprising the typical 10 nm intermediate filament (2). While neurofilaments are critical for radial axon growth and determine axon caliber, microtubules are involved in axon elongation. PKA phosphorylates the head domain of NFL and NFM to inhibit neurofilament assembly (3,4). Research studies have shown neurofilament accumulations in many human neurological disorders including Parkinson's disease (in Lewy bodies along with α-synuclein), Alzheimer's disease, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) (1).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: α-Synuclein is a protein of 140-amino acids expressed abundantly in the brain. α-Synuclein is also the main component of pathogenic Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites. Research studies have shown that mutations of the α-synuclein gene are linked to Parkinson's disease (1).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) is one of the earliest events in a cascade that controls a variety of cellular responses, including secretion, gene expression, proliferation, and muscle contraction (1,2). PKC isoforms belong to three groups based on calcium dependency and activators. Classical PKCs are calcium-dependent via their C2 domains and are activated by phosphatidylserine (PS), diacylglycerol (DAG), and phorbol esters (TPA, PMA) through their cysteine-rich C1 domains. Both novel and atypical PKCs are calcium-independent, but only novel PKCs are activated by PS, DAG, and phorbol esters (3-5). Members of these three PKC groups contain a pseudo-substrate or autoinhibitory domain that binds to substrate-binding sites in the catalytic domain to prevent activation in the absence of cofactors or activators. Control of PKC activity is regulated through three distinct phosphorylation events. Phosphorylation occurs in vivo at Thr500 in the activation loop, at Thr641 through autophosphorylation, and at the carboxy-terminal hydrophobic site Ser660 (2). Atypical PKC isoforms lack hydrophobic region phosphorylation, which correlates with the presence of glutamic acid rather than the serine or threonine residues found in more typical PKC isoforms. The enzyme PDK1 or a close relative is responsible for PKC activation. A recent addition to the PKC superfamily is PKCμ (PKD), which is regulated by DAG and TPA through its C1 domain. PKD is distinguished by the presence of a PH domain and by its unique substrate recognition and Golgi localization (6). PKC-related kinases (PRK) lack the C1 domain and do not respond to DAG or phorbol esters. Phosphatidylinositol lipids activate PRKs, and small Rho-family GTPases bind to the homology region 1 (HR1) to regulate PRK kinase activity (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Heme oxygenase (HO) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the catabolism of heme that results in the release of carbon monoxide, iron, and biliverdin (1). The products of this enzymatic reaction play important biological roles in antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and cytoprotective functions (2). Heme oxygenase comprises two isozymes, including the constitutively expressed HO-2 isozyme and the inducible HO-1 isozyme (3). Inducible HO-1 is expressed as an adaptive response to several stimuli, including heme, metals, and hormones (4). The induction of HO-1 has been implicated in numerous disease states, such as transplant rejection, hypertension, atherosclerosis, Alzheimer disease, endotoxic shock, diabetes, inflammation, and neurological disorders (1,5).

$129
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin)

Background: Adenosine Receptor A2a (A2AR) is a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). As a member of the purinergic adenosine receptors (A1, A2, and A3), A2AR activates classic G-protein signaling pathways upon binding of adenosine (1). Adenosine is present in all cells and extracellular fluids. Adenosine signaling, via A2AR, is mobilized during both physiological and pathological conditions. For example, adenosine, via A2AR, modulates neuronal function, acting to fine-tune neuronal function (2). A2AR function is modulated, in part, by its ability to form functional heteromers with other GPCRs, including dopamine receptors (D1 and D3), metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR5), and others (3). In the brain, A2AR is enriched in the basal ganglia, suggesting that A2AR may be a potential drug target for neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson’s disease, drug addiction, and psychiatric disorders (4). Outside of the brain, A2AR may act as an immune checkpoint molecule to maintain an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment, an environment that exhibits relatively elevated adenosine levels (5, 6).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF, PDCD8) is a ubiquitously expressed flavoprotein that plays a critical role in caspase-independent apoptosis (reviewed in 1,2). AIF is normally localized to the mitochondrial intermembrane space and released in response to apoptotic stimuli (3). Treatment of isolated nuclei with recombinant AIF leads to early apoptotic events, such as chromatin condensation and large-scale DNA fragmentation (3). Studies of AIF knockout mice have shown that the apoptotic activity of AIF is cell type and stimuli-dependent. Also noted was that AIF was required for embryoid body cavitation, representing the first wave of programmed cell death during embryonic morphogenesis (4). Structural analysis of AIF revealed two important regions, the first having oxidoreductase activity and the second being a potential DNA binding domain (3,5). While AIF is redox-active and can behave as an NADH oxidase, this activity is not required for inducing apoptosis (6). Instead, recent studies suggest that AIF has dual functions, a pro-apoptotic activity in the nucleus via its DNA binding and an anti-apoptotic activity via the scavenging of free radicals through its oxidoreductase activity (2,7).

$115
20 µl
$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Amyloid β (Aβ) precursor protein (APP) is a 100-140 kDa transmembrane glycoprotein that exists as several isoforms (1). The amino acid sequence of APP contains the amyloid domain, which can be released by a two-step proteolytic cleavage (1). The extracellular deposition and accumulation of the released Aβ fragments form the main components of amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease (1). APP can be phosphorylated at several sites, which may affect the proteolytic processing and secretion of this protein (2-5). Phosphorylation at Thr668 (a position corresponding to the APP695 isoform) by cyclin-dependent kinase is cell-cycle dependent and peaks during G2/M phase (4). APP phosphorylated at Thr668 exists in adult rat brain and correlates with cultured neuronal differentiation (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Western Blotting

Background: Amyloid β (Aβ) precursor protein (APP) is a 100-140 kDa transmembrane glycoprotein that exists as several isoforms (1). The amino acid sequence of APP contains the amyloid domain, which can be released by a two-step proteolytic cleavage (1). The extracellular deposition and accumulation of the released Aβ fragments form the main components of amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease (1). APP can be phosphorylated at several sites, which may affect the proteolytic processing and secretion of this protein (2-5). Phosphorylation at Thr668 (a position corresponding to the APP695 isoform) by cyclin-dependent kinase is cell-cycle dependent and peaks during G2/M phase (4). APP phosphorylated at Thr668 exists in adult rat brain and correlates with cultured neuronal differentiation (5,6).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Western Blotting

Background: Amyloid β (Aβ) precursor protein (APP) is a 100-140 kDa transmembrane glycoprotein that exists as several isoforms (1). The amino acid sequence of APP contains the amyloid domain, which can be released by a two-step proteolytic cleavage (1). The extracellular deposition and accumulation of the released Aβ fragments form the main components of amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease (1). APP can be phosphorylated at several sites, which may affect the proteolytic processing and secretion of this protein (2-5). Phosphorylation at Thr668 (a position corresponding to the APP695 isoform) by cyclin-dependent kinase is cell-cycle dependent and peaks during G2/M phase (4). APP phosphorylated at Thr668 exists in adult rat brain and correlates with cultured neuronal differentiation (5,6).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 488 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct immunofluorescent analysis in mouse cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated β-Amyloid (D54D2) XP® Rabbit mAb #8243.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen)

Background: Amyloid β (Aβ) precursor protein (APP) is a 100-140 kDa transmembrane glycoprotein that exists as several isoforms (1). The amino acid sequence of APP contains the amyloid domain, which can be released by a two-step proteolytic cleavage (1). The extracellular deposition and accumulation of the released Aβ fragments form the main components of amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease (1). APP can be phosphorylated at several sites, which may affect the proteolytic processing and secretion of this protein (2-5). Phosphorylation at Thr668 (a position corresponding to the APP695 isoform) by cyclin-dependent kinase is cell-cycle dependent and peaks during G2/M phase (4). APP phosphorylated at Thr668 exists in adult rat brain and correlates with cultured neuronal differentiation (5,6).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 594 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct immunofluorescent analysis. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated β-Amyloid (D54D2) XP® Rabbit mAb #8243.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen)

Background: Amyloid β (Aβ) precursor protein (APP) is a 100-140 kDa transmembrane glycoprotein that exists as several isoforms (1). The amino acid sequence of APP contains the amyloid domain, which can be released by a two-step proteolytic cleavage (1). The extracellular deposition and accumulation of the released Aβ fragments form the main components of amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease (1). APP can be phosphorylated at several sites, which may affect the proteolytic processing and secretion of this protein (2-5). Phosphorylation at Thr668 (a position corresponding to the APP695 isoform) by cyclin-dependent kinase is cell-cycle dependent and peaks during G2/M phase (4). APP phosphorylated at Thr668 exists in adult rat brain and correlates with cultured neuronal differentiation (5,6).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 647 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct immunofluorescent analysis. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated β-Amyloid (D54D2) XP® Rabbit mAb #8243.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen)

Background: Amyloid β (Aβ) precursor protein (APP) is a 100-140 kDa transmembrane glycoprotein that exists as several isoforms (1). The amino acid sequence of APP contains the amyloid domain, which can be released by a two-step proteolytic cleavage (1). The extracellular deposition and accumulation of the released Aβ fragments form the main components of amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease (1). APP can be phosphorylated at several sites, which may affect the proteolytic processing and secretion of this protein (2-5). Phosphorylation at Thr668 (a position corresponding to the APP695 isoform) by cyclin-dependent kinase is cell-cycle dependent and peaks during G2/M phase (4). APP phosphorylated at Thr668 exists in adult rat brain and correlates with cultured neuronal differentiation (5,6).